SYRIA & Growing

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Lady Fatemah TrustBACK TO NEWSLETTER SEARCH

7th
Feb
2014

January 2014 Newsletter


Dear Patrons,Assalamu Alaykum Save the Date – Gala Dinner 2014 We are pleased to inform you that this year’s Annual Gala Dinner will take place on Saturday 26th April at the Thistle Hotel, Heathrow. The Guest speaker will be Ms Kate Brooks, Photojournalist. Kate’s photographs have been published across the globe and she has been the recipient of numerous international awards, including PDN 30, POYI, Lucie Awards, Communication Arts, American Photography. She has exhibited in group and solo shows in Europe, the U.S. and the U.A.E. The event attracts over 400 patrons and well-wishers of the trust and presents an excellent opportunity to advertise a business or service. Please contact us on info@ladyfatemahtrust.org for sponsorship opportunities or to book a table at the event. As we enter a New Year, we would like to thank you wholeheartedly for all your generosity in transforming the lives of so many human beings in so many countries with differing needs but one common humanitarian response. The start of the New Year, 1st of January 2014, coincided with the death anniversary of the most famous orphaned child that ever lived, Prophet Muhammad. We have consequently reviewed our programs in caring for the orphaned child and the widowed mother and will regularly update you on the opportunities to make a difference to their lives. In his own words the Holy Prophet said: A story of persistence to overcome adversity Our November newsletter told of the assistance given to Sister Samah Abu Amsha in Gaza and we are pleased to note from our local partners the stories of a strong willed lady that resulted in taking the first steps towards overcoming the dilemmas of her life. Samah and her children suffer from life threatening conditions, her eldest daughter of 12 years suffers from an aggressive tumor. Our partner support the beneficiaries of your assistance by carrying out periodic home visits. They have noticed Samah in high spirits with her self-confidence having been notably improved, and the determination of her of speaking about future plans to expand her micro-finance project into a convenience store, which she actually started, as she bought a new set of racks, where she can keep more items for selling, and upon the demands of her customers she started selling eggs, spices, and other food items. Samah earns about $200 per month, and she makes a saving out of her monthly income for her daughter’s future needs. She takes her children to the public gardens where they can enjoy the fresh air and eat their favourite food and therefore letting them relish good childhood moments that they deserve. Samah is pleased that now she can provide her children with their needs of food and clothes, besides being able to continue the medical follow up that her children and herself need. In addition, Samah reconciled with her brother, who became helpful and supportive to her, which resulted in improving her psychological status and putting her troubled past behind her. Samah said to: It is like being in a dream, it is a true bliss to be able to earn my living in dignity. Now, I pray for Allah to keep my children and me healthy. I extend my deepest gratitude and prayers to the Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust for their support that made positive changes in my life.” The British Muslim Awards 2014 The LFT is pleased to announce that it was one of five charities shortlisted for the Charity of the Year award at the British Muslim Awards held on 30 January 2014. Although, the LFT did not ultimately win, it was shortlisted alongside leading UK charities such as Islamic Relief, Muslim Aid and Muslim Hands. The nomination is testament to the generous and effective support of all its donors. Cheryl Gillian MP recognises LFT’s work in Parliament; colleague encourages DFID to support further “Mrs Cheryl Gillan (MP for Chesham and Amersham) (Conservative): There is no doubt that all colleagues mean well, but the enormity of this humanitarian crisis means it is imperative for the Government to continue to help as many people as possible—and help the many rather than the few in this case rather than using helping the few as an excuse. Other agencies are helping, like the Lady Fatemah Trust in my constituency—a small charitable organisation that takes no administrative fees whatever—so what can the Government do to help support those charities? This one has already distributed 103 tonnes of food to Syrian refugees in Lebanon. Mr Mark Harper (MP for Forest of Dean and Minister for Immigration) (Conservative) : I am very grateful to my Right Honourable friend for drawing attention to the work of that excellent organisation in her constituency. We are working with various organisations, including partner organisations, but the Secretary of State for International Development is present, and will have heard the details about this charity. I am sure that she will discuss with my Right Honourable friend whether we can do more to support its work in helping people in the region. Restore an orphan’s smile: In addition to Iraq, the Trust has established fostering programs to care for children in India, Pakistan, Iran and Lebanon and Gaza. One such orphaned child from Gaza is Sajid al Nirab, a nine year old boy, living in the Jabalia refugee camp with his mother and younger deaf sister. In October 2013, he lost his father, an event that left both him and his sister traumatized. With the help of the LFT, both children have been receiving counseling sessions and guidance on a regular basis to help them overcome their loss. At its heart, the LFT’s orphan sponsorship program intends to reach the most destitute of families. Frequently, such families do not have access to charitable organizations or public welfare departments. Disease, lack of information, or simply abject poverty prevents them from seeking assistance. In some cases, mothers cannot even afford the cost of transportation, and find it difficult to travel if they have no one to look after their young children whilst away. For £30 a month, you can sponsor an orphan, and give a child the chance for a better future. Did you know that over 1,000 orphans in the city of Karbala and in the rest of Iraq receive monthly support though your generosity and thousands more can be assisted? Salima Memorial Medical Education Project In order to honour the service and dedication of the late Salima Padhani to the LFT, the Trustees established a project in her name in November 2011. The Salima Memorial Medical Education Project provides bursaries for impoverished students in developing countries who wish to undertake medical education, including nursing, dentistry, general practice and other medical professions. Since its inception, the project has had 29 beneficiaries, and is a definitive way in which Salima’s short but inspiring life can live on through many others. For further information on the latest appeals, please visit the LFT’s dedicated page. LiFT Tanzania – Water infrastructure to the islands of Pemba The LFT is delighted to inform you that it has been able to successfully complete the construction of two 5,000 litre water storage tanks for three villages in the Pemba district of Tanzania, which has benefited approximately 1,500 people. The storage facilities were constructed with the assistance of village members and as a result of their hard work and your generosity, these villages now have a reliable supply of clean, safe water that can be used for drinking, cleaning, and cooking. With the completion of this project, 50% of the Pemba Island now has a constant supply of clean water. To ensure that this is extended to the whole island, the LFT is embarking on a project to provide similar facilities to a further ten villages. The total cost of this will be approximately $11,000 (USD). With this support from well-wishers such as you, sever thousand villagers have been relived from a trek of between 1 and 5 kilometers fetching water and spending hours on the trek. According to Imam al Baqir, “The first act to be rewarded on the Day of Judgment is the charity of water.” LiFT Kenya – clean water for subsistence farming. In remembrance of Bibi Sakina, the LFT is launching an appeal to provide clean water to the residents of the Burani village, located in the Kwale district of Kenya. Nearly a third of all adults in this district live below the food poverty line and in destitute conditions. The residents of the Burani village are mainly subsistence farmers and access to clean water is essential for the growth of their crops. In 2007, a borehole, connected to a hand pump, was dug to extract water from the land, but since then, the pipes have rusted and adversely affected the quality of the water obtained. As such, the LFT is launching an appeal to help fund the replacement of these pipes. The total cost of doing so is just under £1,000 and will significantly improve the lives of a whole village. Children will be able to access clean drinking water; families will be able to cook, wash, and clean safely, and farmers will be able to nourish their crops without contamination. The LFT humbly requests you to help fund such a fundamental necessity, to which every single person should have access. LiFT Syria The conflict in Syria has developed into a severe and worsening crisis, with more and more families fleeing their homes and seeking sanctuary in neighbouring countries every day. The UN has estimated that 2.5 million refugees have fled to nearby countries, including Lebanon, Turkey, and Jordan. Uprooted and in unfamiliar countries, these refugees are in desperate need of shelter, food and water. To make matters worse, millions of displaced Syrian refugees are facing a bitter winter, with heavy snow and freezing temperatures adding to their already grim living conditions. With each passing day, more lives are lost, more families are torn apart and more people are forced to flee their homes. For those who have fled, the battle for survival is far from over. International organizations and NGOs continue to provide emergency relief despite insecure operating conditions, but the crisis has become so overwhelming, and funds so overstretched that these agencies have to make the impossible choice of who to help and who leave to fend for themselves. It’s a problem no refugee should have to face, and a choice no aid worker should have to make. Lebanon is one country that has opened its doors to hundreds of thousands of refugees and repeatedly called on donor countries to fulfill their financial pledges and help it support the Syrian refugee crisis that has left its administrative capacity beleaguered. As a result, the LFT has strived tirelessly, to pioneer economically inspiring initiatives to give the refugees a means of earning, whilst simultaneously engaging in urgent aid distribution. In its latest endeavour, the LFT has facilitated the setup of a clothes manufacturing workshop to provide refugee tailors and seamstresses with employment. The workshop looks specifically to employ Syrian widows who are particularly vulnerable, as they often have to provide for a large number of dependents single-handedly. The expense of fitting out the workshop, purchasing materials and other items amounted to $46,500. However, business is flourishing and the day-to-day operations have begun to generate a profit. The workshop has employed eight Syrian refugees and begun to train four apprentices. As a result, 85 people have benefited from this initiative and many more will continue to do so the initiative expands in line with growth in demand. The LFT passionately believes in providing recipients with the tools needed to ensure economic independence. This is just one example of the LFT’s many constructive and microfinance projects that look to make this vision a reality. LiFT Palestine – educate to empower Since 2008, the LFT has sponsored a number of students studying at the Atfaluna School for the Deaf. More than a third of the children enrolled at the School live in distressing poverty; their families cannot afford uniforms, school bags, stationery supplies, or even their child’s daily lunch. There are two current initiatives that support these disadvantaged students’ ability to study ensuring safe transport to school and Atfaluna provides the students in its care with a daily hot meal for the duration of the academic year. The lunch program at Atfaluna is considered a vital part of the services offered as it results in improved health and academic performance. It also eases the financial burden placed on parents as they have one fewer meal to worry about providing. The School has appealed to the LFT to fund one term’s worth of meals for its 300 students, the cost of which comes to $8,800. The School has also requested the LFT to contribute towards the transport costs of 36 students who are struggling to meet the cost of daily school buses. The total cost per month is approximately $1,800, and the LFT is looking to fund an academic year’s worth of transport costs. In a country plagued by war, conflict, and poverty, having a disability only adds to the difficulty of breaking free from the hopeless cycle of violence and destitution. By supporting the LFT, you could help make a difference in a deaf child’s life and light up what might otherwise be a desolate existence. LFT eye-care – the power of vision restored With your generous support, in 2013, over 1,000 people were given the gift of sight through a simple and inexpensive cataract operation. Although almost no one goes blind from a cataract in the developed world, this condition is still the major cause of blindness in developing countries, where health insurance schemes are patchy or non-existent, and people are too poor to afford the cost of surgery. For a mere £15 or £30 a month, you can provide a cataract operation for someone in Pakistan or East Africa respectively, and give someone the gift of sight. The testimonials of those who have been assisted have shown how transformational this simple operation can be. It means that those who were previously affected no longer bump into simple obstacles or accidentally swallow insects in the water they drink. The gift of sight also means that they are able to participate in activities with their children and grandchildren, and enjoy the simple pleasures of everyday life. LiFT Lebanon – rehabilitation war traumatized injured children After the July 2006 war in South Lebanon, the LFT launched a project to assist mentally and physically disabled children in Nabatiyeh. This region has 400 known cases of handicapped children out of a population of 120,000 inhabitants. This is a greater than average proportion and can be linked to the psychological trauma of war and the land mines that continue to litter the countryside. Most of the affected children come from the most vulnerable strata of Lebanese society. Their families live in poor and disadvantaged areas and a large number lost their original homes or their source of income during the wars. As a result, they are unable to pay for the cost of the rehabilitative services their children need. These 400 children are an understatement of the true number of disabled children. In a society where disability is still severely stigmatised, many families are reluctant to come forward or to admit their child may be suffering from a disability. Still others assume that they will be unable to pay for treatment and so consider it futile to apply for financial assistance. Ironically, with proper care, many of these children can be helped without the development of a permanent disability. As a result, the LFT has teamed up with local grass roots organizations to offer rehabilitative services to handicapped children. Currently, the LFT covers part of the cost of rehabilitative care for 129 handicapped children from vulnerable families in three main categories: physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy. The annual cost of providing this is more than $100,000. Please help the LFT continue to offer this vital service by donating generously.
9th
Mar
2014

Newsletter March 2014 Newsletter


The Lady Fâtemah (a.s.) Charitable Trust

September Lodge, Village Way, Little Chalfont, Buckinghamshire, HP7 9PU

Newsletter March 2014 Rabi’ul Thani / Jumada Al Awwal1435 A.H.

Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem

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Dear Patrons, Assalamu Alaykum Secure your seat at the LFT’s annual Gala Dinner for 2014    We are just under 2 weeks away from the Trusts’ 8th annual Gala Dinner. A few seats remain if you have not secured your place for this year’s exciting event. A limited number of tables of 10 or 12 seats remain which you may want for your family or friends to enjoy the evening together. We are pleased to announce that we will be joined by Vartan Melkonian who is the UN Ambassador for Street Children and the Co-Patron for the Consortium for Street Children, a body he co-founded with the former UK Prime Minister. Vartan will deliver a short address at this year’s Gala Dinner with an amazing life story and a passion for helping street children around the world. Hear it first hand from the man as only he can tell the story that is a true reflection of his own like. At the start of the year we made a commitment to improve the Trust’s work in recognition of the birth of the most famous orphan to walk the earth, none other than the father of Lady Fatemah, Propher Muhammad (saw). The plight of the orphans who are reduced to living on the streets must be one of the most tragic plights to hit humanity. Vartan is well placed to talk first-hand about these issues and how to empower then through education, healthcare and mentoring. One of the items specially created to benefit the work that the Trust carries out with orphans has been donated by the artist Sr Anam al-Katib. It is a canvas painting of 18” x 16” dimensions and aptly depicts the saying of the Holy Prophet in Arabic whose English translation reads: I and those who care for the orphan will be in Jannah. Those of you who are not able to attend the dinner may wish to pledge your donation for this piece. If successful we will ship it to you free of cost. Orphan care – #ICareIActWeBenefit Our partnership with the Development and Relief Organisation serving Orphans in Karbala is also going to strengthen the Trust’s work with nearly 500 orphans supported every month in Karbala and over 1,000 orphans in Iraq. In addition to Iraq, the Trust has established fostering programs to care for children in India, Pakistan, Iraqi and Syrian refugees and Palestinian refugees in Gaza.   One such orphaned child from Gaza is Sajid al Nirab, a nine year old boy, living in the Jabalia refugee camp with his mother and younger deaf sister. In October 2013, he lost his father, an event that left both him and his sister traumatised. With the help of the LFT, both children have been receiving counseling sessions and guidance on a regular basis to help them overcome their loss.   At its heart, the LFT’s orphan sponsorship program intends to reach the most destitute of families. Frequently, such families do not have access to charitable organisations or public welfare departments. Disease, lack of information, or simply abject poverty prevents them from seeking assistance. In some cases, mothers cannot even afford the cost of transportation, and find it difficult to travel if they have no one to look after their young children whilst away. For £30 a month, you can sponsor an orphan, and give a child the chance for a better future. Will you make today the day when you increase your assistance to these young lives who will have a bright future with your love and concern? Let us turn our concern into action and see the benefits in their smiles to hope for a better future for the benefit of all humanity. Solar Lighting – Iraq’s marshlands   In the marshlands of Southern Iraq the inhabitants live in a way that has been largely untouched for millennia. It is one of the most underdeveloped regions in the country. The residents of the marshes suffered extensively during the years of Saddam’s rule and large tracts of the region were drained and the waters poisoned. A decade on from the fall of his regime the areas are recovering and their activity normalizing. The residents mainly rely on agriculture and fishing for their sustenance.   Most of this vast region and has little or no electricity. They rely on kerosene lamps for lighting which are expensive polluting and do not illuminate their houses to be safe at night let alone for them or their children to be able to read. This has resulted in a high rate of illiteracy in the area thereby continuing to limit the economic prospects of these people. Many of the modern conveniences we take for granted need electricity. The residents need to travel several miles for the simple task of charging their mobile phones, if they own one.   The generosity of the N2K walkers over the Arbaeen in 1434 has so far enabled the Trust to distribute solar lighting to 233 households in the marshland regions, impacting on the lives of 1,912 people. The lamps not only light up their homes but enable their children to play and read after dark, in safety. It also allows them to charge their mobile phones at home. After installation these units have no operational cost other than the changing of a light bulb at the cost of US$1, when required. With your generosity, solar units are being distributed in Iraq and Tanzania. Solar cookers are also being distributed in Iraq, Pakistan and Tanzania. There remains a huge need for this clean form of energy that is transforming lives. Please do help is light up more homes so they too can be safe and able to learn. It costs a mere US$25 to provide a home with safe lighting or US$15 to provide them with a safe means of cooking. LFT eye-care – Cataract Appeal With your generous support, in the first three quarters of 2013, nearly 1,000 people were given the gift of sight through a simple and inexpensive cataract operation every year. Although almost no one goes blind from a cataract in the developed world, this condition is still the major cause of blindness in developing countries, where health insurance schemes are patchy or non-existent, and people are too poor to afford the cost of surgery. For a mere £15 or £30 a month, you can provide a cataract operation for someone in Pakistan or East Africa respectively, and give someone the gift of sight. Since the project began in Kashmir and Pakistan in January 2007, over 10,000 people have benefitted from this simple operation. With your help, this number could rise and pave the way for a situation in which no one in the developing world goes blind from such an easily curable affliction. LiFT Lebanon   After the July 2006 war in South Lebanon, the LFT launched a project to assist mentally and physically disabled children in Nabatiyeh. This region has 400 known cases of handicapped children out of a population of 120,000 inhabitants. This is a greater than average proportion and can be linked to the psychological trauma of war and the land mines that continue to litter the countryside. Most of the affected children come from the most vulnerable strata of Lebanese society. Their families live in poor and disadvantaged areas and a large number lost their original homes or their source of incomeduring the wars. As a result, they are unable to pay for the cost of the rehabilitative services their children need.  These 400 children are an understatement of the true number of disabled children. In a society where disability is still severely stigmatised, many fam  ilies are reluctant to come forward or to admit their child may be suffering from a disability. Still others assume that they will be unable to pay for treatment and so consider it futile to apply for financial assistance. Ironically, with proper care, many of these children can be helped without the development of a permanent disability.   As a result, the LFT is offering rehabilitative services to handicapped children. Currently, the LFT covers part of the cost of rehabilitative care for 129 handicapped children from vulnerable families in three main categories: physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy. The annual cost of providing this is more than $100,000 or US$250 per child per annum. Please help the LFT continue to offer this vital service by donating generously. LiFT Pakistan The LFT’s partner in Pakistan, the Madinatul Ilm Charitable Trust (MICT), has always sought to serve the needs of the poorest segments of Pakistan’s society. In a country where public healthcare services are inadequate, MICT has helped provide much needed medical support to impoverished patients, in addition to its many other humanitarian activities. To this end, it is seeking sponsorship to help fund the medical treatment of seven patients suffering from a variety of conditions. The total cost of these treatments amounts to just under £5,000 and further detail on the patients and their conditions, as well as the individual costs of treatment can be found here. LiFT Tanzania   As part of the Bibi Sakina Water Project, the LFT has already provided water storage facilities to seven villages in one half of the Island of Pemba in Tanzania. The LFT is now set to assist a further 10 villages in the second half of the Island to ensure that all residents have access to clean, safe water when required. The provision of water sto rage facilities to the villages of Pungua, Mtemani, and Maungani Majenzi will result in the benefits of the Project being extended to a furth   er 2,000 people at a mere cost of $10,500 (USD). For the residents of these villages, gaining access to clean water has always been a challenge.  Water comes from mainland Pemba, under the sea, to distant water spots, but the supply is irregular and far from where villagers live.    This means that a meager amount of water is available a few times a week and that residents have to walk between one and two kilometers daily to fetch water that may not be even be available on their arrival. Access to regular and uncontaminated water is a basic human right. Please suppo rt the LFT in ensuring that the members of these villages are able to secure their access to this fundamental human right. LiFT Palestine   Early diagnosis of hearing loss is essential for effective treatment and successful rehabilitation. It helps improve the development of language and communication skills by providing deaf children with practical intervention services. As a result, adults who as children had the advantage of early diagnosis and intervention, are better equipped to participate in economic life and are less likely to be resigned to lives of economic dependence and deprivation. The Atfaluna School for Deaf Children (ASDC) in Gaza runs a community outreach programme for the early detection of hearing loss, and provides free hearing screenings to more than 12,000 children and adults from impoverished and marginalised districts. Recently, ASDC audiologists have been inundated with requests for screenings from community organisations and in particular pre-schools and kindergartens in deprived areas. However, the large number of hearing tests carried out to meet the increased demand has resulted in equipment failures.As a result, the ASDC is seeking funds to repair its equipment and allow it to continue providing screening services to the mo st vulnerable members of Palestinian society. The total cost is just over $5,500 (USD).   In a country plagued by war, conflict, and poverty, having a disability only adds to the difficulty of breaking free from the hopeless cycle of violence and destitution. By supporting the LFT, you could help make a difference in a deaf child’s life and light up what might otherwise be a desolate existence. Gala Dinner 2013: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/video-gallery Video Gallery: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/video-gallery Image gallery: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/image-gallery Solar Cooker Training: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDG-ZV8xv4w https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/lady-fatemah-charitable-trust/id598326331?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D4   twitter.com/#!/LFTrust    http://www.facebook.com/LadyFatemahTrust   We recently registered BT’s ‘My Donate’ where you can donate to the Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust   To support the LFT’s Appeal we have now set up a system of donating to your favourite charity via your mobile phone. To donate £1 text LFCT141 to 70070 To donate £2 text LFCT142 to 70070 To donate £3 text LFCT143 to 70070 To donate £4 text LFCT144 to 70070 To donate £5 text LFCT145 to 70070 To donate £10 text LFCT1410 to 70070 The Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust is one of the first charities to use its own unique text code, LFCT14, to raise funds by using JustTextGiving. In the spirit of the LFT, this is a new service which has no set up or associated costs for the LFT and every penny donated via text goes directly to the LFT. Once your donation has gone through, you can also add Gift Aid to the donation, which we recommend as it gives us an extra 25% on your donation. From today, LFT supporter can make donations of up to £10 by texting LFCT14 and either 1,2,3,4,5 or 10 to 70070. The text message is free and all funds will go to worthy causes. Ijaza:
  • ·  
Development and Relief Foundation and Islamic Humanitarian Service:
  • · The Trust has recently entered into an agreement with Development & Relief Foundation in the US, similar to IHS in Kitchener, Ontario,
  Give As You Earn:
  • This is the UK’s largest payroll giving scheme and is administered by CAF (Charities Aid Foundation). Any employee or pensioner paid under PAYE can donate to a charitable organization in the UK. The Trust has now been set up to receive GAYE donations, and our reference number is GYE 458449.  
To make a regular donation by standing order, please download a mandate from the website or contact us and we will send one to you. http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate . You can make a donation by using our secure on-line payment facility at https://secure.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate.php Please remember that completing a Gift Aid form substantially boosts your donation by 25% if you are a UK taxpayer. Yours sincerely,  Ms Ahlam M El Hattab, Trustee info@ladyfatemahtrust.org  http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/ 

Tel +44 (0) 1494 762 063, Email info@ladyfatemahtrust.org, Fax +44 (0) 1494 762 286, Mobile +44 (0) 7798 76 10 20 Website: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org 

 

This Trust operates on ZERO admin cost since 1997 and helps thousands of impoverished people around the world through projects covering education, humanitarian relief, medical assistance, basic food, water provision, eye clinics and orphan care. This email and any files transmitted with it are intended solely for the use of the individual(s) or entity to whom they are addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, you should not copy it, use it or disclose its contents. Please notify info@ladyfatemahtrust.org immediately and destroy your copy. Internet communications including e-mails cannot be guaranteed to be secure or error free. While the LFT has taken steps to control the spread of viruses on its systems it cannot guarantee that this email (including any attachments) is free of any virus or other harmful matter and accepts no responsibility for any loss or damage resulting from the recipient receiving, opening or using it.
11th
Mar
2014

February 2014 Newsletter


Bismillahi rahmaani Rahim

Dear Patrons,Assalamu Alaykum As you are aware, this year, we have focused our attention on increasing the work that the LFT does with your generous support in supporting the needs of the orphaned child and widowed mothers. We are pleased to announce the entering into an Agreement for Mutual Co-operation with the Development and Relief Foundation to facilitate our donors in the USA to be able to donate to supporting orphans in Karbala and the LFT’s numerous other projects in Iraq in a transparent and tax efficient manner. Each month we try and feature the life of an individual who has been touched by your generosity. The individual we feature this month did not let his upbringing in the Ejipura slums in Bangalore from stopping him working hard to gain entry to Shirdi Sai Engineering College in Bangalore to study for a BEng in Mechanical engineering. Through working with a partner organization, the LFT has secured work experience for Mohammad in a manufacturing plant where he is gaining experience in designing automotive parts. Mohammad’s dedication and hard work have got him this far and he works tirelessly to support the children from the Ejipura slums with their homework in weekly tuition classes for boys and girls aged 8 – 18 years. He is currently supporting 81 children. He has expressed a desire to bring the standard of these slum children’s literacy up to the same as private international schools in Bangalore and we are keen to support him achieve this transformation in the lives of the children he works with. Secure your seat at the LFT’s annual Gala Dinner for 2014 This year, the LFT’s annual Gala Dinner will be held on 26 April 2014 at the Thistle Hotel, Heathrow. A limited number of seats remain for this informative and entertaining evening. The keynote speaker for this year’s event is the renowned international photojournalist, Kate Brooks, whose work has featured in the Wall Street Journal and Newsweek. Limited copies of her book, In the Light of Darkness, signed by her will be available for purchase on the night. We will also be entertained on the night by the award winning filmmaker and comedian Aatif Nawaz whose comedy show Talk Roti to Me is currently featuring at the Leicester Square Theatre. Let there be light – LiFT the darkness in the marshlands of Southern Iraq     The LFT has continued with the initiative to support villagers in rural Iraq with solar lighting. This month we have reached out to assist almost 250 households consisting of 1,900 members living in the marshlands of southern Iraq with solar lighting for their homes. The villages assisted include Karma Bani Said Neighbourhood in Suk Shuyukh, the Al-Jabayish and Chabayish villages of Al-Nasiriya and Al-Nasiriy village. These individuals will be able to carry on the activities in our daily lives after dark that we all take for granted like reading. They will also be able to charge a mobile phone form the installation. In these remote villages, it is not economically viable for an electricity distribution grid to be installed and they would have been reliant on kerosene lamps with the fume and burn hazards that poses. Please donate generously so we can continue to help the needy in Iraq and Tanzania with solar lighting and cooking devices. Year of the Orphaned Child                                           The UN has released figures to show that the death toll in Iraq in 2013 was the highest in five years, leaving over 7,800 people dead in its wake. With such deaths come the disintegration of family support structures and the creation of widows and orphans, struggling to survive. With your help, some of the children orphaned by these tragic events can be fostered under the care and protection of the LFT. In Iraq, the LFT has partnered with the Development and Relief Foundation, a local charity, whose work with orphans in Iraq is exemplary, thereby ensuring an effective achievement of the Trust’s objectives.  In addition to Iraq, the Trust has established fostering programs to care for children in India, Pakistan, Iran and Lebanon and Gaza. One such orphaned child from Gaza is Sajid al Nirab, a nine year old boy, living in the Jabalia refugee camp with his mother and younger deaf sister. In October 2013, he lost his father, an event that left both him and his sister traumatised. With the help of the LFT, both children have been receiving counseling sessions and guidance on a regular basis to help them overcome their loss. At its heart, the LFT’s orphan sponsorship program intends to reach the most destitute of families. Frequently, such families do not have access to charitable organisations or public welfare departments. Disease, lack of information, or simply abject poverty prevents them from seeking assistance. In some cases, mothers cannot even afford the cost of transportation, and find it difficult to travel if they have no one to look after their young children whilst away. For £30 a month, you can sponsor an orphan, and give a child the chance for a better future. Did you know that 499 orphans in the city of Karbala receive monthly support though your generosity and thousands more can be assisted? LiFT Microfinance for Syrian refugees in Lebanon   The conflict in Syria has developed into a severe and worsening crisis, with more and more families fleeing their homes and seeking sanctuary in neighbouring countries every day. The UN has estimated that 2.5 million refugees have fled to nearby countries, including Lebanon, Turkey, and Jordan. Uprooted and in unfamiliar countries, these refugees are in desperate need of shelter, food and water. To make matters worse, millions of displaced Syrian refugees are facing a bitter winter, with heavy snow and freezing temperatures adding to their already grim living conditions. With each passing day, more lives are lost, more families are torn apart and more people are forced to flee their homes. For those who have fled, the battle for survival is far from over. International organisations and NGOs continue to provide emergency relief despite insecure operating conditions, but the crisis has become so overwhelming, and funds so overstretched that these agencies have to make the impossible choice of who to help and who leave to fend for themselves. It’s a problem no refugee should have to face, and a choice no aid worker should have to make. Lebanon is one country that has opened its doors to hundreds of thousands of refugees and repeatedly called on donor countries to fulfill their financial pledges and help it support the Syrian refugee crisis that has left its administrative capacity beleaguered. As a result, the LFT has strived tirelessly with its partner organization to pioneer economically inspiring initiatives, whilst simultaneously engaging in urgent aid distribution. In its latest endeavour, the LFT has facilitated the set up of a clothes manufacturing workshop to provide refugee tailors and seamstresses with employment. The workshop looks specifically to employ Syrian widows who are particularly vulnerable, as they often have to provide for a large number of dependents single-handedly. The expense of fitting out the workshop, purchasing materials and other items amounted to $46,500. Business is flourishing and the day-to-day operations have begun to generate a profit. The workshop has employed eight Syrian refugees and begun to train four apprentices. As a result, 85 people have benefited from this initiative to become self-sufficient and many more will continue to do so as demand grows. The LFT passionately believes in providing recipients with the tools needed to ensure economic independence. This is just one example of the LFT’s many constructive and microfinance projects that look to make this vision a reality. LiFT Palestine – fresh water to one of the world’s neediest places       As part of the Bibi Sakina water projects initiative and in collaboration with the Humanitarian Relief Society, the LFT has distributed six water coolers to a girls’ school in the Arroub refugee camp in Gaza, thereby providing clean, sanitized water facilities to over 450 girls studying there. In 1948, over 66% of Palestinians were uprooted from four hundred villages, leaving over 700,000 homeless. As a result, refugee camps have sprouted across the West Bank, Gaza, Jordan, Syria, and Lebanon over the decades. One such camp is the Arroub Refugee camp, situated in the north of the Hebron District.  It was founded in 1947, under the supervision of UNRWA. LFT eye-care – Cataract Appeal     With your generous support, in the first three quarters of 2013, nearly 1,000 people were given the gift of sight through a simple and inexpensive cataract operation. Although almost no one goes blind from a cataract in the developed world, this condition is still the major cause of blindness in developing countries, where health insurance schemes are patchy or non-existent, and people are too poor to afford the cost of surgery. For a mere £15 or £30 a month, you can provide a cataract operation for someone in Pakistan or East Africa respectively, and give someone the gift of sight. Since the project began in Kashmir and Pakistan in January 2007, over 10,000 people have benefitted from this simple operation. With your help, this number could rise and pave the way for a situation in which no one in the developing world goes blind from such an easily curable affliction. LiFT poverty in Syrian refugees living in Lebanon               The number of Syrian refugees living in Lebanon recently exceeded the 1 million mark and represents nearly half of the 2 million refugees who have fled Syria’s civil war, which began in March 2011. This is in addition to an estimated 6.5 million Syrians have been displaced internally, thus resulting in just under half of the country’s 22 million population being either internally or externally displaced.   Bitter winter conditions, inadequate or non-existent heating, and a lack of warm clothing has exacerbated the already desperate plight of the refugees over the winter period. Refugees now represent a quarter of the current Lebanese population and given the expected growth in the refugee population, this proportion is expected to rise over the coming year. The Syrian crisis has therefore, placed an enormous burden on Lebanese communities and Lebanese infrastructure. The refugee presence has resulted in rising rents, a fierce competition for jobs, a surge in begging, and placed a significant strain on the healthcare, education and sewage systems. To help alleviate the situation, the LFT has worked tirelessly with its partner organisation in Lebanon, to provide nutritional food supplements to struggling refugee families. In total, the two organisations have managed to distribute 119 metric tonnes of food to 6,988 beneficiaries in 45 villages. We realize that our efforts have only scratched the surface of the problem; much more needs to be done and the LFT strongly urges you to donate to help a people who have lost everything in their fight for freedom. LiFT hunger in the Syrian refugees in Lebanon     After the July 2006 war in South Lebanon, the LFT launched a project to assist mentally and physically disabled children in Nabatiyeh. This region has 400 known cases of handicapped children out of a population of 120,000 inhabitants. This is a greater than average proportion and can be linked to the psychological trauma of war and the land mines that continue to litter the countryside. Most of the affected children come from the most vulnerable strata of Lebanese society. Their families live in poor and disadvantaged areas and a large number lost their original homes or their source of income during the wars. As a result, they are unable to pay for the cost of the rehabilitative services their children need. These 400 children are an understatement of the true number of disabled children. In a society where disability is still severely stigmatised, many families are reluctant to come forward or to admit their child may be suffering from a disability. Still others assume that they will be unable to pay for treatment and so consider it futile to apply for financial assistance. Ironically, with proper care, many of these children can be helped without the development of a permanent disability. As a result, the LFT has teamed up with local grass roots organisations to offer rehabilitative services to handicapped children. Currently, the LFT covers part of the cost of rehabilitative care for 129 handicapped children from vulnerable families in three main categories: physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy. The annual cost of providing this is more than $100,000 (USD). Please help the LFT continue to offer this vital service by donating generously. LiFT Pakistan                 The LFT, in conjunction with Pravalli, has successfully completed five water projects in Abbottabad, Pakistan. Here, over 80% of the population live in rural areas and literacy is limited to just over half the population. While in cities, 64% of households have access to piped water, the proportion in towns is negligible. Infrastructure is poor and access to electricity is low. Given these circumstances, Poverty is rampant; over 50% of the population live below poverty line and 30% merely subsist. To make matters worse, in October 2005 the district was hit by an earthquake, resulting in a significant decrease in the region’s already desperate living conditions. To top it off, environmental degradation in Pakistan is a constant threat to biological diversity and the natural resource base of the country. Unfortunately, the effects of this are disproportionately skewed against the poorest sections of society. The last few decades have witnessed increasingly exploitative and disenfranchising practices including illegal timber harvesting, deforestation on mountains and hillsides, over-cultivation, uncontrolled grazing, poor water resource management and a host of other socio-political factors which have further contributed to the country’s ecological degradation. It is in this context that the LFT completed its water projects and it humbly requests you to donate so that it can help other villages in a similar situation. LiFT the residents of Kwale out of poverty in Kenya     The LFT has distributed 25 goats to the Sakina Women Group in the Chengoni district of Kenya, in turn supporting 137 people afflicted by poverty. Given the climate and vegetation that grows in the district, cattle-breeding is a particularly suitable economic activity and can help make cattle-owners economically independent. The average goat produces one litre of milk a day and of this, 20% is consumed. The rest can be sold and used to facilitate the purchase of other necessary food items. After a few years, goats can be mated to increase stocks and ensure a steady stream of long-term income and asset security.
9th
May
2014

April 2014 Newsletter


The Lady Fâtemah (a.s.) Charitable Trust

September Lodge, Village Way, Little Chalfont, Buckinghamshire, HP7 9PU

Newsletter April 2014 Jumada Al Awwal / Rajab 1435 A.H.

Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ Dear Patrons,

Assalamu Alaykum I congratulate you all on the onset of the Month of Rajab when Muslims around the world will start their preparations for the Holy Month of Ramadhan. Across the globe over a billion Muslims will observe fasts for the whole month. However, many will have meagre resources with which to break their fast with and having had no food or water all day may not have enough sustenance with which to break their fast. It is these most vulnerable victim of war and natural disasters that the LiFTaar program reaches out to every year for the past 17 years. This year we aim to continue our food distribution program in Gaza, Iraq, Lebanon, Pakistan and Tanzania. Last years’ program reached out to over 40,000 individuals at a cost of £150,000.   We aim to maintain this level of support at the very least and with your generosity reach out even further. LFT’s 9th Annual Gala Dinner for 2014 The LFT would like to thank you for your support at our 9th Annual Gala dinner. With the grace of God, the evening was an immense success and allowed us to showcase some of the key projects that we have engaged with this year, and to share with you the Trust’s vision for the next 12 months.   Our inspirational keynote speaker, Vartan Melkonian, UN ambassador for Street Children and Co-Patron (with the former Prime Minister, John Major) of the Global Consortium of Charities working with Street Children, astounded the audience with his life story.     Orphaned at a very young age with no recollection of his mother, Vartan’s earliest memories stem back to arriving at an orphanage, where his clothes were immediately incinerated for fear of what they might be host to. Some years later, though still very young, he left the orphanage to scrape a meagre living off the streets of Beirut, selling chewing gum to US sailors.   Despite his disadvantage from childhood and the subsequent hardships that he endured, Vartan went on to reach the top of his profession as a world-renowned composer and conductor of classical music. He credits his transformation to a belief in the Almighty and says he is the voice of the unheard and speaks for the troubled lives of millions of children across the globe. His story is truly remarkable and inspires all of us working with orphaned and vulnerable children, particularly during the LFT’s Year of the Orphaned Child.     In line with the practice of previous years, attendees at the Dinner were invited to donate their £60 contribution to one of three causes that the LFT supports, and a large proportion voted to help the Trust continue its invaluable work with orphans.   If you were not able to participate in this initiative at the Dinner, you are still welcome to purchase LFT£s in multiples of £60 and vote where you wish for this to be spent. As has always been the case, the Trust deducts no administration charge or commission from your donation so every £1 that you donated is an LFT£1 used for the purpose you select. Why not give a loved one the gift of an LFT£60 voucher for a birthday, wedding or anniversary and put a smile on two faces for the price of one.   To help the Trust continue its focus on orphans in its ‘Year of the Orphaned Child’, please support Eisa Ali as he soars to great heights help orphans in Iraq. Eisa will jump out of a plane from 13,000 ft to raise funds for children who have to navigate the world alone, and give them a chance to maximise their potential by safeguarding their immediate food, shelter, education and healthcare needs.   You can find Eisa’s Justgiving page at http://www.justgiving.com/Eisa-Ali2.    Remember each £30 donation will look after an orphan in Iraq for a month. Please help him reach his £2,000 target, which will provide comprehensive care to three orphans for a whole year.   LiFT Gaza – Education The LFT recognizes from its programs in Gaza, Pakistan and Tanzania that the educational performance of students can be greatly impacted by malnourished students in school. The teachers find students who don’t respond in lessons because they have come to school without having had any food and often go without food for the whole day.   One such program to alleviate hunger from students and make them better nourished is at the Atfaluna School for the deaf in Gaza. Here is a video to show you the impact of the program:   LiFT Syria – food distribution to the most vulnerable       The Syrian civil war shows no sign of abating and the refugee crisis continues to deteriorate. I write this newsletter on a monthly basis and each month add an additional 10,000-20,000 to the estimated number of women, men and children who have lost their lives as a result of the Syrian people’s struggle for freedom. The estimated figure now stands at a staggering 150,000. In addition to the number dead, the UN estimates that 2.7m people have been externally displaced, with a further 4.25m internally displaced, meaning that nearly a third of Syria’s pre-crisis population has been uprooted.   Lebanon is one country that has opened its doors to over a million refugees and repeatedly called on donor countries to fulfill their financial pledges to help it support the Syrian refugee crisis that has left its administrative capacity beleaguered.     In conjunction with its partner organisation in Lebanon, the LFT has been able to help over 5,000 Syrian families in Lebanon since the start of the crisis. This has included distributing over 2,000 food parcels, stocked with essential food items, during the month of Ramadhan, 1,000 mattresses, 2,000 pillows, and 2,000 winter tracksuits to help ref ugees brave the bitter cold winter that afflicted the country this year. In addition to this, they have provided healthcare facilities to those in need and have initiated numerous microfinance projects to help refugees rebuild their lives and sustain themselves with dignity. With the coming of Ramadhan, the LFT would like to start raising funds to distribute Ramadhan food parcels to the most vulnerable elements of Lebanese society – the Syrian refugees.   For them, every day is a struggle and Ramadhan is a month of additional hardship. Uprooted and in unfamiliar countries, these refugees are in desperate need of shelter, food and water. For those who have fled, the battle for survival is far from over, and by donating to the LFT, you can help alleviate some oftheir hardships.   LiFT solar lighting in Africa     “Kerosene is costly, it smells bad, the light is dim, the smoke hurts the eyes. It was that or darkness.”   This was a testi monial from the recipient of a solar lantern on The Elder’s bold program to eradicate the kerosene lamp from Africa by 2020.    The LFT recognizing the fire and health hazard of this common device together with the environmental harm and economic burden on the families has begun a visionary program of distributing solar lighting, as   well as 500 solar cookers, to needy families near Arusha in Northern Tanzania.   A total of 720 families have been assisted by this scheme with solar lanterns and a supply of spare bulbs and we hope that with your generosity even more families can be assisted to LiFT them out of the causes of their economic impoverishment into healthier and safer living conditions for them and their families.   Each unit has the ability to charge a mobile phone as well as a separate reading light that is used independent of the lantern’s main beam.   The choice of fumes or darkness costing up to £15 per month to purchase the kerosene has now been transformed into free clean bright smokeless light for families to continue to socialize, work and read after sundown all for a cost of just £30 per family. LiFT Iraq – Marshlands of southern Iraq       The LFT has initiated a solar lighting project in the Mesopotamian Marshes of Iraq. Once home to several hundred thousand people, the Marshes are now home to as few as 20,000. Under Saddam, the 90% of the Marshes were drained (in what the UN described as “one of the world’s greatest environmental disasters”), destroying the economic life of those who depended on it for their subsistence.     As a result, the people living in the Marshes tend to be poor and lack basic facilities. Most houses don’t have electricity and in a bid to remedy this, the LFT has initiated a solar lighting project in the area. Under Phase 1, over 1,200 families have benefitted from the introduction of electricity, and nearly 2,000 people now have access to it.    The provision of electricity to these families will transform their lives in more ways than one. It will end the use of carbon fuels, which emit hazardous fumes, allow children to study after dark, and can stimulate enterprise by allowing women to work after their children have gone to bed.   The LFT hopes to extend this project to thousands more in its subsequent phases and asks you to donate generously to help make this possible.   LFT Healthcare – Cataract Appeal       With your generous support, in the first quarter of 2014, 360 people were given the gift of sight through a simple and inexpensive cataract operation.   Although almost no one goes blind from a cataract in the developed world, this condition is still the major cause of blindness in developing countries, where health insurance schemes are patchy or non-existent, and people are too poor to afford the cost of surgery.   For a mere £15 or £30 a month, you can provide a cataract operation for someone in Pakistan or East Africa respectively, and give someone the gift of sight.     Since the project began in Kashmir and Pakistan in January 2007, nearly 11,000 people have benefitted from this simple operation. With your help, this number could rise and pave the way for a situation in which no one in the developing world goes blind from such an easily curable affliction.   Gala Dinner 2013: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/video-gallery Video Gallery: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/video-gallery Image gallery: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/image-gallery Solar Cooker Training: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDG-ZV8xv4w   https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/lady-fatemah-charitable-trust/id598326331?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D4   twitter.com/#!/LFTrust    http://www.facebook.com/LadyFatemahTrust   We recently registered BT’s ‘My Donate’ where you can donate to the Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust   To support the LFT’s Appeal we have now set up a system of donating to your favourite charity via your mobile phone. To donate £1 text LFCT141 to 70070 To donate £2 text LFCT142 to 70070 To donate £3 text LFCT143 to 70070 To donate £4 text LFCT144 to 70070 To donate £5 text LFCT145 to 70070 To donate £10 text LFCT1410 to 70070 The Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust is one of the first charities to use its own unique text code, LFCT14, to raise funds by using JustTextGiving. In the spirit of the LFT, this is a new service which has no set up or associated costs for the LFT and every penny donated via text goes directly to the LFT. Once your donation has gone through, you can also add Gift Aid to the donation, which we recommend as it gives us an extra 25% on your donation. From today, LFT supporter can make donations of up to £10 by texting LFCT14 and either 1,2,3,4,5 or 10 to 70070. The text message is free and all funds will go to worthy causes. Ijaza:
  • ·  
Development and Relief Foundation and Islamic Humanitarian Service:
  • · The Trust has recently entered into an agreement with Development & Relief Foundation in the US, similar to IHS in Kitchener, Ontario,
  Give As You Earn:
  • This is the UK’s largest payroll giving scheme and is administered by CAF (Charities Aid Foundation). Any employee or pensioner paid under PAYE can donate to a charitable organization in the UK. The Trust has now been set up to receive GAYE donations, and our reference number is GYE 458449.  
To make a regular donation by standing order, please download a mandate from the website or contact us and we will send one to you. http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate . You can make a donation by using our secure on-line payment facility at https://secure.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate.php Please remember that completing a Gift Aid form substantially boosts your donation by 25% if you are a UK taxpayer. Yours sincerely,  Ms Ahlam M El Hattab, Trustee info@ladyfatemahtrust.org  http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/ 

Tel +44 (0) 1494 762 063, Email info@ladyfatemahtrust.org, Fax +44 (0) 1494 762 286, Mobile +44 (0) 7798 76 10 20 Website: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org 

 

This Trust operates on ZERO admin cost since 1997 and helps thousands of impoverished people around the world through projects covering education, humanitarian relief, medical assistance, basic food, water provision, eye clinics and orphan care. This email and any files transmitted with it are intended solely for the use of the individual(s) or entity to whom they are addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, you should not copy it, use it or disclose its contents. Please notify info@ladyfatemahtrust.org immediately and destroy your copy. Internet communications including e-mails cannot be guaranteed to be secure or error free. While the LFT has taken steps to control the spread of viruses on its systems it cannot guarantee that this email (including any attachments) is free of any virus or other harmful matter and accepts no responsibility for any loss or damage resulting from the recipient receiving, opening or using it.
29th
May
2014

May 2014 Newsletter


Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem

Dear Patrons,

Assalamu Alaykum and welcome to this month’s newsletter. As always, we would like to extend our heartfelt thanks to you for your support and generosity.

Without it, we would be unable to continue the work that we do.  We pray that all your efforts are accepted and that your kindness is rewarded. Ameen.

The Holy Prophet (pbuh) has said:

“…. Blessed is the wealth of a

Muslim from which he gives to the poor, the orphans and to needy travellers….” and the Trust is named after the daughter of the Holy Prophet, whose example in giving to the needy is quoted in the Holy Quran.

Empowering Street Children – Karbala In continuing to focus our attention to empowering the orphan child, the Trust is working with its local partner, the Development and Relief Foundation in Karbala to educate and where necessary provide adequate shelter to the vulnerable street children in the Holy City of Karbala. The Trust will effectively use its membership of the Global Consortium of Street Children to ensure that these children don’t lose their childhood to menial labour tasks out of necessity to feed themselves and their families. Whilst they serve the pilgrims to the Holy Shrines the young children are reduced to hard labour tasks and lose out on the opportunity to be educated and create a future for themselves. LiFTaar: Ramadhan Iftaar appeal This is one of the Trust’s most widely supported projects, where, in some countries, as little as £3.75 can feed one person for an entire month. Last Ramadhan, over £150,000 was raised reaching over 40,000 individuals across the world. For us living in the Western world, it may seem tremendously difficult to fast during tirelessly long summer days, but we do so with the knowledge that at the end of each day, we can quench our thirst with refreshingly cool water drawn from readily accessible taps, and hunger with an abundance, and often, overindulgence of food. Unfortunately, for hundreds of millions of people elsewhere in the world, the fear and anxiety of remaining hungry and perpetually malnourished is an endless and inescapable reality. In the wake of Ramadhan, the Trust will be distributing food parcels to the most vulnerable members of society in Pakistan, Lebanon, Iraq, Iran, Tanzania, and Gaza. By doing so, it will ensure that, for at least one month in the year, impoverished families can shed the anxiety of wondering where their next meal will come from. In Pakistan for example, the Trust will be working with the Madinatul Ilm Charitable Trust, as it has done in previous years, to distribute food parcels to families in Northern Pakistan, where untimely rainfall and hail storms have resulted in a poor wheat crop. MICT intends to distribute food parcels to over 1,000 families, thereby benefitting at least 7,000 impoverished individuals during the month of Ramadhan. In other places in the Middle East, the Trust hopes to reach over 2,500 Afghan and Iraqi refugee families who have struggled to meet ends meet in the region’s hyperinflationary economy. In a month where fasting allows us to understand the plight of those less fortunate than ourselves, the LFT humbly requests you to donate so that they are able to have at least one square meal at the end of their fast. LiFT: Solar projects Working with our local partner in Pakistan, the Trust will embark on an innovative scheme to assist 3,000 families in the Thar Desert region of NW Pakistan with solar cookers. The arid conditions in the area mean that the families have no reliable source of firewood with which to cook and kerosene is both polluting as well as expensive for them to obtain. This will free up around US$15 per family per month as well as no less than 2 hours a day for the women of walking around in the scorching sunlight scavenging for firewood in the desert. The training videos for use of the cookers will be shown to the families and enable them to turn the sunlight from a source of discomfort to a free source fuel. This complements the solar projects that the LFT has initiated in East Africa, Iraq, and Pakistan. These projects range from introducing solar lighting to homes and the provision of solar cookers. For example, in Northern Tanzania, 720 families benefitted from the provision of solar lamps by the LFT, and in the Mesopotamian Marshes of Iraq, over 5,000 people now have access to solar lighting.  In rural parts of Pakistan, the LFT has distributed around 3,000 solar cookers, allowing families to harness the natural power of sunlight, meaning that they are no longer exposed to the toxic fumes emitted by kerosene cookers. These devices have transformed homes into clean, bright, and smokeless spaces, allowing families to continue their lives in a non-toxic and healthy environment. A solar light costs just £30 per family and can allow families to continue socialising, working or reading after sundown, so please consider donating towards a very worthwhile product. LFT eye-care – Cataract Appeal With your generous support, in the first quarter of 2014, 360 people were given the gift of sight through a simple and inexpensive cataract operation. Although almost no one goes blind from a cataract in the developed world, this condition is still the major cause of blindness in developing countries, where health insurance schemes are patchy or non-existent, and people are too poor to afford the cost of surgery. For a mere £15 or £30 a month, you can provide a cataract operation for someone in Pakistan or East Africa respectively, and give someone the gift of sight. Since the project began in Kashmir and Pakistan in January 2007, nearly 11,000 people have benefitted from this simple operation. With your help, this number could rise and pave the way for a situation in which no one in the developing world goes blind from such an easily curable affliction. LiFT Syria The Syrian civil war shows no sign of abating and the refugee crisis continues to deteriorate. I write this newsletter on a monthly basis and each month add an additional 10,000-20,000 to the estimated number of women, men and children who have lost their lives as a result of the Syrian people’s struggle for freedom. The estimated figure now stands at a staggering 150,000. In addition to the number dead, the UN estimates that 2.7m people have been externally displaced, with a further 4.25m internally displaced, meaning that nearly a third of Syria’s pre-crisis population has been uprooted. Lebanon is one country that has opened its doors to over a million refugees and repeatedly called on donor countries to fulfill their financial pledges to help it support the Syrian refugee crisis that has left its administrative capacity beleaguered. In conjunction with its partner organisation in Lebanon, Manessa, the LFT has been able to help over 5,000 Syrian families in Lebanon since the start of the crisis. This has included distributing over 2,000 food parcels, stocked with essential food items, during the month of Ramadhan, 1,000 mattresses, 2,000 pillows, and 2,000 winter tracksuits to help refugees brave the bitter cold winter that afflicted the country this year. In addition to this, they have provided healthcare facilities to those in need and have initiated numerous microfinance projects to help refugees rebuild their lives and sustain themselves with dignity. With the coming of Ramadhan, the LFT would like to start raising funds to distribute Ramadhan food parcels to the most vulnerable elements of Lebanese society – the Syrian refugees. For them, every day is a struggle and Ramadhan is a month of additional hardship. Uprooted and in unfamiliar countries, these refugees are in desperate need of shelter, food and water. For those who have fled, the battle for survival is far from over, and by donating to the LFT, you can help alleviate some of their hardships. LiFT Tanzania As part of the Bibi Sakina Water Project and in conjunction with PADEO, a local NGO working in Tanzania, the LFT has provided water storage facilities to an additional three villages (Pungua, Mtemani, and Maungani) in Tanzania, thus benefitting nearly 2,000 people. For the residents of these villages, gaining access to clean water was always a challenge.  Water was only available at distant government supplied water spots, but even these were not always replenished and water was not available every day of the week. Because water spots were so far, some family members (generally women) were retained specifically to ferry water to the villages several times a day, thereby preventing them from supporting their families in earning a livelihood, and stunting their economic potential. With the new water storage facilities located within these villages, families now have ready access to clean water and the women whose role it was to fetch water are now actively able to take part in helping support their families economically. Access to regular and uncontaminated water is a basic human right. The LFT would like to continue its work in helping other villages gain easy access to clean water and needs your continued support in making this a reality. Gala Dinner 2013: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/video-gallery Video Gallery: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/video-gallery Image gallery: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/image-gallery Solar Cooker Training: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDG-ZV8xv4w   https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/lady-fatemah-charitable-trust/id598326331?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D4   twitter.com/#!/LFTrust    http://www.facebook.com/LadyFatemahTrust   We recently registered BT’s ‘My Donate’ where you can donate to the Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust   To support the LFT’s Appeal we have now set up a system of donating to your favourite charity via your mobile phone. To donate £1 text LFCT141 to 70070 To donate £2 text LFCT142 to 70070 To donate £3 text LFCT143 to 70070 To donate £4 text LFCT144 to 70070 To donate £5 text LFCT145 to 70070 To donate £10 text LFCT1410 to 70070 The Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust is one of the first charities to use its own unique text code, LFCT14, to raise funds by using JustTextGiving. In the spirit of the LFT, this is a new service which has no set up or associated costs for the LFT and every penny donated via text goes directly to the LFT. Once your donation has gone through, you can also add Gift Aid to the donation, which we recommend as it gives us an extra 25% on your donation. From today, LFT supporter can make donations of up to £10 by texting LFCT14 and either 1,2,3,4,5 or 10 to 70070. The text message is free and all funds will go to worthy causes. Ijaza:
  • ·  
Development and Relief Foundation and Islamic Humanitarian Service:
  • · The Trust has recently entered into an agreement with Development & Relief Foundation in the US, similar to IHS in Kitchener, Ontario,
  Give As You Earn:
  • This is the UK’s largest payroll giving scheme and is administered by CAF (Charities Aid Foundation). Any employee or pensioner paid under PAYE can donate to a charitable organization in the UK. The Trust has now been set up to receive GAYE donations, and our reference number is GYE 458449.  
To make a regular donation by standing order, please download a mandate from the website or contact us and we will send one to you. http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate . You can make a donation by using our secure on-line payment facility at https://secure.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate.php Please remember that completing a Gift Aid form substantially boosts your donation by 25% if you are a UK taxpayer. Yours sincerely,  Ms Ahlam M El Hattab, Trustee info@ladyfatemahtrust.org  http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/ 

Tel +44 (0) 1494 762 063, Email info@ladyfatemahtrust.org, Fax +44 (0) 1494 762 286, Mobile +44 (0) 7798 76 10 20 Website: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org 

 

This Trust operates on ZERO admin cost since 1997 and helps thousands of impoverished people around the world through projects covering education, humanitarian relief, medical assistance, basic food, water provision, eye clinics and orphan care. This email and any files transmitted with it are intended solely for the use of the individual(s) or entity to whom they are addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, you should not copy it, use it or disclose its contents. Please notify info@ladyfatemahtrust.org immediately and destroy your copy. Internet communications including e-mails cannot be guaranteed to be secure or error free. While the LFT has taken steps to control the spread of viruses on its systems it cannot guarantee that this email (including any attachments) is free of any virus or other harmful matter and accepts no responsibility for any loss or damage resulting from the recipient receiving, opening or using it.
14th
Oct
2014

Newsletter September 2014 Thul-Qedah – Thul-Hijjah 1435 A.H.


The Lady Fâtemah (a.s.) Charitable Trust

September Lodge, Village Way, Little Chalfont, Buckinghamshire, HP7 9PU

Newsletter September 2014 Thul-Qedah – Thul-Hijjah 1435 A.H.

Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  Dear Patrons This month, I would like to share with you the story of a member of the LFT family that you have assisted in Kashmir. Mohammad Siddiq is a 42-year-old construction worker who supports a family of five from his meagre wages. A few months ago he noticed blurred vision in his right eye. At work, he developed clumsiness, knocked over things and bumped into objects and people at his right side because he did not perceive them. His employer warned him to get treatment for his eye condition or be laid off. However, he was unable to afford the high cost of eye surgery. After being introduced to the free eye hospital in Akora Khattak by a neighbour, he was examined there and diagnosed with right eye cataract. Due to his difficult socio-economic situation, he was given an emergency appointment. His employer agreed to grant him sick leave until he recovered from surgery. Mohammad has now returned to his job and is happy that he can support his family as before. Besides restoring his vision, free cataract surgery performed by dedicated and caring hospital staff brought about another change in Mohammad’s life and outlook: He is now trying to help those members of his community who need support to the best of his ability  Your generosity ensured that not only will Mohammad Siddiq and his family remain free of need but that he will now be an ambassador for empowerment and support to members of his community who are needy of assistance. Orphan care In countries where war, famine or poverty is part of everyday life, millions of children are orphaned and left to struggle for survival. Over the last decade alone, armed conflict has resulted in six million children being wounded or disabled for life, and one million orphaned. The Trust has established fostering programs to care for children in India, Pakistan, Iraq, Iran and Lebanon. The orphan sponsorship program intends to reach the most destitute of families. Frequently, such families do not have access to charitable organisations or public welfare departments. Disease, ignorance or simply abject poverty prevents them from seeking assistance. In some cases, mothers simply cannot afford the cost of transportation, and find it difficult to travel if they have no one to look after their young children whilst away. The LFT focus on educating the orphan and providing skills and materials to the widows to earn their own income and become self-sufficient. This is the most effective means to empowering the orphaned child and his or her mother to escape from a lifetime of grinding poverty and need. For £30 a month, you can sponsor an orphan, and give a child the chance for a better future. Did you know that 499 orphans in the city of Karbala and a further 1,500 in other parts of Iraq who receive regular receive monthly support though your generosity and thousands more can be assisted? I strongly encourage you to pledge a donation of at least £30 per month for this project in remembrance of the orphans of the family of Imam Hussain (as) after the tragedy of Karbala.  LiFT Kashmir It’s been a month since torrential rains devastated Jammu and Kashmir; experts estimate that this is the worst flooding to affect the area in 60 years. The floodwaters have caused landslides, damaged roads, bridges, buildings, homes, and agricultural land. As a result, over one million people have been cut off from basic services. Hundreds of villages have become completely submerged and thousands of people have been rendered homeless. In addition to killing over 400 people and injuring 540 people, the floodwaters have damaged 1.68 million acres of cropland and damaged nearly 46,000 houses. While any relief effort must focus on rebuilding the area’s long-term infrastructure, there is a very real and desperate need for basic food items, clothing, and immediate shelter. The LFT has decided to focus on the former and is looking to provide basic food items to as many households as it can. With your help, it can reach out and help those suffering from unimaginable hardship, so please donate generously. LFT eye-care – Cataract Appeal Although almost no one goes blind from a cataract in the developed world, this condition is still the major cause of blindness in developing countries, where health insurance schemes are patchy or non-existent, and people are too poor to afford the cost of surgery. For a mere £15 or £30 a month, you can provide a cataract operation for someone in Pakistan or East Africa respectively, and give someone the gift of sight. Since the project began in Kashmir and Pakistan in January 2007, 11,387 people including Mohammad Siddiq whose story I told above, have benefitted from this simple operation. With your help, this number could rise and pave the way for a situation in which no one in the developing world goes blind from such an easily curable affliction. Many others have received assistance for improving eye care in Iraq and Tanzania. We continue to support the Imam Al-Hujjah Hospital in Karbala with equipment for their ophthalmology unit and would encourage you to show your support for this project by pledging the cost of purchasing one or more units of equipment. LiFT Pakistan MICT, in partnership with the LFT, has embarked on an emergency relief programme to provide immediate support to some of the worst affected victims of this year’s floods. As result of heavy monsoon rainfalls, large swathes of the country have been left devastated. According to estimates gathered by the Pakistani government and aid agencies, more than two million people have been directly affected by the floods and over 500 people have been killed as a result of them.  In addition to this, there has been unimaginable damage to private property and infrastructure. Across the Punjab province, including District Sargodha, Chiniot, Jehlum, Hafizabad, Gujranawala and the southern districts of Jhang, Khanewal, Muzaffar Garh, Multan, Layyah, and Dera Ghazi Khan, there has been large-scale damage to property and livelihoods. Graphic images on Pakistan’s TV channels serve as a daily reminder of the scale and continuing suffering of the people. Thousands of women, children and the elderly are living under the open sky, struggling to survive. Those who receive basic meals twice a day consider themselves lucky relative to those who have been left with nothing. The catastrophe has also unleashed a host of medical challenges; for example the lack of sanitation has resulted in the breakout of epidemics, and water borne diseases are rife. As a result, the LFT, in partnership with MICT has instigated a plan to help the most vulnerable members of society in specifically targeted areas. The initiative is looking to provide short-term assistance to individuals, until they can begin sowing crops and are once again able provide for themselves. The plan is being executed in a number of separate phases to ensure the maximum transparency and a targeting of the areas most in need. As in previous years, the LFT will provide food packs to families, containing supplies of basic commodities like rice, flour, cooking oil, sugar and other essential goods.  Additional items will be added depending on their availability and whether the LFT is able to raise sufficient funds. According to present estimates, each basic food pack will cost approximately 3,200 PKR and the LFT is looking to provide 2,000 families with such packs. These flood victims have lost everything – their homes, their belongings, and their livelihoods. Please donate generously, and help alleviate a small portion of their suffering. LiFT Iraq With ISIS in control of large swathes of Northern and Western Iraq, the number of refugees fleeing from their reign of terror has reached unprecedented levels. Thousands have fled to the South, where ISIS have struggled to gain a foothold. Although the number of internally displaced persons within the South is unknown, their need is clear. They have left their homes, belongings, and livelihoods behind, and live in uncertainty on how they will survive from one day to the next. Many are forced to congregate in far off locations, which makes it difficult for mainstream aid agencies to provide them with assistance. As a result, the LFT has decided to work with hundreds of families spread across tens of locations, by providing them with essential items. With the grace of God, and the receipt of thousands of dollars in donations, it has managed to provide essentials ranging from clothing to diapers and shampoo to just under 5,500 displaced people as part of Phase 1 and 2 of this project. With your continued financial support, it hopes to extend this provision in the upcoming phases, so please donate generously. Best Wishes Ms Khadija Gulamhussein, Public Relations volunteer   Gala Dinner 2014: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N-b4I-_7EzE&feature=youtu.be   Video Gallery: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/video-gallery Image gallery: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/image-gallery Solar Cooker Training: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDG-ZV8xv4w   https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/lady-fatemah-charitable-trust/id598326331?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D4   twitter.com/#!/LFTrust    http://www.facebook.com/LadyFatemahTrust   We recently registered BT’s ‘My Donate’ where you can donate to the Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust   To support the LFT’s Appeal we have now set up a system of donating to your favourite charity via your mobile phone. To donate £1 text LFCT141 to 70070; To donate £2 text LFCT142 to 70070 To donate £3 text LFCT143 to 70070; To donate £4 text LFCT144 to 70070 To donate £5 text LFCT145 to 70070; To donate £10 text LFCT1410 to 70070 The Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust is one of the first charities to use its own unique text code, LFCT14, to raise funds by using JustTextGiving. In the spirit of the LFT, this is a new service which has no set up or associated costs for the LFT and every penny donated via text goes directly to the LFT. Once your donation has gone through, you can also add Gift Aid to the donation, which we recommend as it gives us an extra 25% on your donation. From today, LFT supporter can make donations of up to £10 by texting LFCT14 and either 1,2,3,4,5 or 10 to 70070. The text message is free and all funds will go to worthy causes. Ijaza:
  • ·  
Development and Relief Foundation and Islamic Humanitarian Service:
  • · The Trust has recently entered into an agreement with Development & Relief Foundation in the US, similar to IHS in Kitchener, Ontario,
  Give As You Earn:
  • This is the UK’s largest payroll giving scheme and is administered by CAF (Charities Aid Foundation). Any employee or pensioner paid under PAYE can donate to a charitable organization in the UK. The Trust has now been set up to receive GAYE donations, and our reference number is GYE 458449.  
To make a regular donation by standing order, please download a mandate from the website or contact us and we will send one to you. http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate . You can make a donation by using our secure on-line payment facility at https://secure.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate.php Please remember that completing a Gift Aid form substantially boosts your donation by 25% if you are a UK taxpayer. Yours sincerely,  Ms Ahlam M El Hattab, Trustee info@ladyfatemahtrust.org  http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/ 

Tel +44 (0) 1494 762 063, Email info@ladyfatemahtrust.org, Fax +44 (0) 1494 762 286, Mobile +44 (0) 7798 76 10 20 Website: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org 

 

This Trust operates on ZERO admin cost since 1997 and helps thousands of impoverished people around the world through projects covering education, humanitarian relief, medical assistance, basic food, water provision, eye clinics and orphan care. This email and any files transmitted with it are intended solely for the use of the individual(s) or entity to whom they are addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, you should not copy it, use it or disclose its contents. Please notify info@ladyfatemahtrust.org immediately and destroy your copy. Internet communications including e-mails cannot be guaranteed to be secure or error free. While the LFT has taken steps to control the spread of viruses on its systems it cannot guarantee that this email (including any attachments) is free of any virus or other harmful matter and accepts no responsibility for any loss or damage resulting from the recipient receiving, opening or using it.
9th
Nov
2014

Newsletter September 2014 Thul-Qedah – Thul-Hijjah 1435 A.H.


Dear Patrons This month, I would like to share with you the story of a member of the LFT family that you have assisted in Kashmir. Mohammad Siddiq is a 42-year-old construction worker who supports a family of five from his meagre wages. A few months ago he noticed blurred vision in his right eye. At work, he developed clumsiness, knocked over things and bumped into objects and people at his right side because he did not perceive them. His employer warned him to get treatment for his eye condition or be laid off. However, he was unable to afford the high cost of eye surgery. After being introduced to the free eye hospital in Akora Khattak by a neighbour, he was examined there and diagnosed with right eye cataract. Due to his difficult socio-economic situation, he was given an emergency appointment. His employer agreed to grant him sick leave until he recovered from surgery. Mohammad has now returned to his job and is happy that he can support his family as before. Besides restoring his vision, free cataract surgery performed by dedicated and caring hospital staff brought about another change in Mohammad’s life and outlook: He is now trying to help those members of his community who need support to the best of his ability  Your generosity ensured that not only will Mohammad Siddiq and his family remain free of need but that he will now be an ambassador for empowerment and support to members of his community who are needy of assistance. Orphan care In countries where war, famine or poverty is part of everyday life, millions of children are orphaned and left to struggle for survival. Over the last decade alone, armed conflict has resulted in six million children being wounded or disabled for life, and one million orphaned. The Trust has established fostering programs to care for children in India, Pakistan, Iraq, Iran and Lebanon. The orphan sponsorship program intends to reach the most destitute of families. Frequently, such families do not have access to charitable organisations or public welfare departments. Disease, ignorance or simply abject poverty prevents them from seeking assistance. In some cases, mothers simply cannot afford the cost of transportation, and find it difficult to travel if they have no one to look after their young children whilst away. The LFT focus on educating the orphan and providing skills and materials to the widows to earn their own income and become self-sufficient. This is the most effective means to empowering the orphaned child and his or her mother to escape from a lifetime of grinding poverty and need. For £30 a month, you can sponsor an orphan, and give a child the chance for a better future. Did you know that 499 orphans in the city of Karbala and a further 1,500 in other parts of Iraq who receive regular receive monthly support though your generosity and thousands more can be assisted? I strongly encourage you to pledge a donation of at least £30 per month for this project in remembrance of the orphans of the family of Imam Hussain (as) after the tragedy of Karbala.  LiFT Kashmir It’s been a month since torrential rains devastated Jammu and Kashmir; experts estimate that this is the worst flooding to affect the area in 60 years. The floodwaters have caused landslides, damaged roads, bridges, buildings, homes, and agricultural land. As a result, over one million people have been cut off from basic services. Hundreds of villages have become completely submerged and thousands of people have been rendered homeless. In addition to killing over 400 people and injuring 540 people, the floodwaters have damaged 1.68 million acres of cropland and damaged nearly 46,000 houses. While any relief effort must focus on rebuilding the area’s long-term infrastructure, there is a very real and desperate need for basic food items, clothing, and immediate shelter. The LFT has decided to focus on the former and is looking to provide basic food items to as many households as it can. With your help, it can reach out and help those suffering from unimaginable hardship, so please donate generously. LFT eye-care – Cataract Appeal Although almost no one goes blind from a cataract in the developed world, this condition is still the major cause of blindness in developing countries, where health insurance schemes are patchy or non-existent, and people are too poor to afford the cost of surgery. For a mere £15 or £30 a month, you can provide a cataract operation for someone in Pakistan or East Africa respectively, and give someone the gift of sight. Since the project began in Kashmir and Pakistan in January 2007, 11,387 people including Mohammad Siddiq whose story I told above, have benefitted from this simple operation. With your help, this number could rise and pave the way for a situation in which no one in the developing world goes blind from such an easily curable affliction. Many others have received assistance for improving eye care in Iraq and Tanzania. We continue to support the Imam Al-Hujjah Hospital in Karbala with equipment for their ophthalmology unit and would encourage you to show your support for this project by pledging the cost of purchasing one or more units of equipment. LiFT Pakistan MICT, in partnership with the LFT, has embarked on an emergency relief programme to provide immediate support to some of the worst affected victims of this year’s floods. As result of heavy monsoon rainfalls, large swathes of the country have been left devastated. According to estimates gathered by the Pakistani government and aid agencies, more than two million people have been directly affected by the floods and over 500 people have been killed as a result of them.  In addition to this, there has been unimaginable damage to private property and infrastructure. Across the Punjab province, including District Sargodha, Chiniot, Jehlum, Hafizabad, Gujranawala and the southern districts of Jhang, Khanewal, Muzaffar Garh, Multan, Layyah, and Dera Ghazi Khan, there has been large-scale damage to property and livelihoods. Graphic images on Pakistan’s TV channels serve as a daily reminder of the scale and continuing suffering of the people. Thousands of women, children and the elderly are living under the open sky, struggling to survive. Those who receive basic meals twice a day consider themselves lucky relative to those who have been left with nothing. The catastrophe has also unleashed a host of medical challenges; for example the lack of sanitation has resulted in the breakout of epidemics, and water borne diseases are rife. As a result, the LFT, in partnership with MICT has instigated a plan to help the most vulnerable members of society in specifically targeted areas. The initiative is looking to provide short-term assistance to individuals, until they can begin sowing crops and are once again able provide for themselves. The plan is being executed in a number of separate phases to ensure the maximum transparency and a targeting of the areas most in need. As in previous years, the LFT will provide food packs to families, containing supplies of basic commodities like rice, flour, cooking oil, sugar and other essential goods.  Additional items will be added depending on their availability and whether the LFT is able to raise sufficient funds. According to present estimates, each basic food pack will cost approximately 3,200 PKR and the LFT is looking to provide 2,000 families with such packs. These flood victims have lost everything – their homes, their belongings, and their livelihoods. Please donate generously, and help alleviate a small portion of their suffering. LiFT Iraq With ISIS in control of large swathes of Northern and Western Iraq, the number of refugees fleeing from their reign of terror has reached unprecedented levels. Thousands have fled to the South, where ISIS have struggled to gain a foothold. Although the number of internally displaced persons within the South is unknown, their need is clear. They have left their homes, belongings, and livelihoods behind, and live in uncertainty on how they will survive from one day to the next. Many are forced to congregate in far off locations, which makes it difficult for mainstream aid agencies to provide them with assistance. As a result, the LFT has decided to work with hundreds of families spread across tens of locations, by providing them with essential items. With the grace of God, and the receipt of thousands of dollars in donations, it has managed to provide essentials ranging from clothing to diapers and shampoo to just under 5,500 displaced people as part of Phase 1 and 2 of this project. With your continued financial support, it hopes to extend this provision in the upcoming phases, so please donate generously.
13th
Nov
2014

Newsletter September 2014 Thul-Qedah – Thul-Hijjah 1435 A.H.


The Lady Fâtemah (a.s.) Charitable Trust

September Lodge, Village Way, Little Chalfont, Buckinghamshire, HP7 9PU

Newsletter September 2014 Thul-Qedah – Thul-Hijjah 1435 A.H.

Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  Dear Patrons This month, I would like to share with you the story of a member of the LFT family that you have assisted in Kashmir. Mohammad Siddiq is a 42-year-old construction worker who supports a family of five from his meagre wages. A few months ago he noticed blurred vision in his right eye. At work, he developed clumsiness, knocked over things and bumped into objects and people at his right side because he did not perceive them. His employer warned him to get treatment for his eye condition or be laid off. However, he was unable to afford the high cost of eye surgery. After being introduced to the free eye hospital in Akora Khattak by a neighbour, he was examined there and diagnosed with right eye cataract. Due to his difficult socio-economic situation, he was given an emergency appointment. His employer agreed to grant him sick leave until he recovered from surgery. Mohammad has now returned to his job and is happy that he can support his family as before. Besides restoring his vision, free cataract surgery performed by dedicated and caring hospital staff brought about another change in Mohammad’s life and outlook: He is now trying to help those members of his community who need support to the best of his ability  Your generosity ensured that not only will Mohammad Siddiq and his family remain free of need but that he will now be an ambassador for empowerment and support to members of his community who are needy of assistance. Orphan care In countries where war, famine or poverty is part of everyday life, millions of children are orphaned and left to struggle for survival. Over the last decade alone, armed conflict has resulted in six million children being wounded or disabled for life, and one million orphaned. The Trust has established fostering programs to care for children in India, Pakistan, Iraq, Iran and Lebanon. The orphan sponsorship program intends to reach the most destitute of families. Frequently, such families do not have access to charitable organisations or public welfare departments. Disease, ignorance or simply abject poverty prevents them from seeking assistance. In some cases, mothers simply cannot afford the cost of transportation, and find it difficult to travel if they have no one to look after their young children whilst away. The LFT focus on educating the orphan and providing skills and materials to the widows to earn their own income and become self-sufficient. This is the most effective means to empowering the orphaned child and his or her mother to escape from a lifetime of grinding poverty and need. For £30 a month, you can sponsor an orphan, and give a child the chance for a better future. Did you know that 499 orphans in the city of Karbala and a further 1,500 in other parts of Iraq who receive regular receive monthly support though your generosity and thousands more can be assisted? I strongly encourage you to pledge a donation of at least £30 per month for this project in remembrance of the orphans of the family of Imam Hussain (as) after the tragedy of Karbala.  LiFT Kashmir It’s been a month since torrential rains devastated Jammu and Kashmir; experts estimate that this is the worst flooding to affect the area in 60 years. The floodwaters have caused landslides, damaged roads, bridges, buildings, homes, and agricultural land. As a result, over one million people have been cut off from basic services. Hundreds of villages have become completely submerged and thousands of people have been rendered homeless. In addition to killing over 400 people and injuring 540 people, the floodwaters have damaged 1.68 million acres of cropland and damaged nearly 46,000 houses. While any relief effort must focus on rebuilding the area’s long-term infrastructure, there is a very real and desperate need for basic food items, clothing, and immediate shelter. The LFT has decided to focus on the former and is looking to provide basic food items to as many households as it can. With your help, it can reach out and help those suffering from unimaginable hardship, so please donate generously. LFT eye-care – Cataract Appeal Although almost no one goes blind from a cataract in the developed world, this condition is still the major cause of blindness in developing countries, where health insurance schemes are patchy or non-existent, and people are too poor to afford the cost of surgery. For a mere £15 or £30 a month, you can provide a cataract operation for someone in Pakistan or East Africa respectively, and give someone the gift of sight. Since the project began in Kashmir and Pakistan in January 2007, 11,387 people including Mohammad Siddiq whose story I told above, have benefitted from this simple operation. With your help, this number could rise and pave the way for a situation in which no one in the developing world goes blind from such an easily curable affliction. Many others have received assistance for improving eye care in Iraq and Tanzania. We continue to support the Imam Al-Hujjah Hospital in Karbala with equipment for their ophthalmology unit and would encourage you to show your support for this project by pledging the cost of purchasing one or more units of equipment. LiFT Pakistan MICT, in partnership with the LFT, has embarked on an emergency relief programme to provide immediate support to some of the worst affected victims of this year’s floods. As result of heavy monsoon rainfalls, large swathes of the country have been left devastated. According to estimates gathered by the Pakistani government and aid agencies, more than two million people have been directly affected by the floods and over 500 people have been killed as a result of them.  In addition to this, there has been unimaginable damage to private property and infrastructure. Across the Punjab province, including District Sargodha, Chiniot, Jehlum, Hafizabad, Gujranawala and the southern districts of Jhang, Khanewal, Muzaffar Garh, Multan, Layyah, and Dera Ghazi Khan, there has been large-scale damage to property and livelihoods. Graphic images on Pakistan’s TV channels serve as a daily reminder of the scale and continuing suffering of the people. Thousands of women, children and the elderly are living under the open sky, struggling to survive. Those who receive basic meals twice a day consider themselves lucky relative to those who have been left with nothing. The catastrophe has also unleashed a host of medical challenges; for example the lack of sanitation has resulted in the breakout of epidemics, and water borne diseases are rife. As a result, the LFT, in partnership with MICT has instigated a plan to help the most vulnerable members of society in specifically targeted areas. The initiative is looking to provide short-term assistance to individuals, until they can begin sowing crops and are once again able provide for themselves. The plan is being executed in a number of separate phases to ensure the maximum transparency and a targeting of the areas most in need. As in previous years, the LFT will provide food packs to families, containing supplies of basic commodities like rice, flour, cooking oil, sugar and other essential goods.  Additional items will be added depending on their availability and whether the LFT is able to raise sufficient funds. According to present estimates, each basic food pack will cost approximately 3,200 PKR and the LFT is looking to provide 2,000 families with such packs. These flood victims have lost everything – their homes, their belongings, and their livelihoods. Please donate generously, and help alleviate a small portion of their suffering. LiFT Iraq With ISIS in control of large swathes of Northern and Western Iraq, the number of refugees fleeing from their reign of terror has reached unprecedented levels. Thousands have fled to the South, where ISIS have struggled to gain a foothold. Although the number of internally displaced persons within the South is unknown, their need is clear. They have left their homes, belongings, and livelihoods behind, and live in uncertainty on how they will survive from one day to the next. Many are forced to congregate in far off locations, which makes it difficult for mainstream aid agencies to provide them with assistance. As a result, the LFT has decided to work with hundreds of families spread across tens of locations, by providing them with essential items. With the grace of God, and the receipt of thousands of dollars in donations, it has managed to provide essentials ranging from clothing to diapers and shampoo to just under 5,500 displaced people as part of Phase 1 and 2 of this project. With your continued financial support, it hopes to extend this provision in the upcoming phases, so please donate generously. Best Wishes Ms Khadija Gulamhussein, Public Relations volunteer   Gala Dinner 2014: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N-b4I-_7EzE&feature=youtu.be   Video Gallery: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/video-gallery Image gallery: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/image-gallery Solar Cooker Training: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDG-ZV8xv4w   https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/lady-fatemah-charitable-trust/id598326331?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D4   twitter.com/#!/LFTrust    http://www.facebook.com/LadyFatemahTrust   We recently registered BT’s ‘My Donate’ where you can donate to the Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust   To support the LFT’s Appeal we have now set up a system of donating to your favourite charity via your mobile phone. To donate £1 text LFCT141 to 70070; To donate £2 text LFCT142 to 70070 To donate £3 text LFCT143 to 70070; To donate £4 text LFCT144 to 70070 To donate £5 text LFCT145 to 70070; To donate £10 text LFCT1410 to 70070 The Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust is one of the first charities to use its own unique text code, LFCT14, to raise funds by using JustTextGiving. In the spirit of the LFT, this is a new service which has no set up or associated costs for the LFT and every penny donated via text goes directly to the LFT. Once your donation has gone through, you can also add Gift Aid to the donation, which we recommend as it gives us an extra 25% on your donation. From today, LFT supporter can make donations of up to £10 by texting LFCT14 and either 1,2,3,4,5 or 10 to 70070. The text message is free and all funds will go to worthy causes. Ijaza:
  • ·  
Development and Relief Foundation and Islamic Humanitarian Service:
  • · The Trust has recently entered into an agreement with Development & Relief Foundation in the US, similar to IHS in Kitchener, Ontario,
  Give As You Earn:
  • This is the UK’s largest payroll giving scheme and is administered by CAF (Charities Aid Foundation). Any employee or pensioner paid under PAYE can donate to a charitable organization in the UK. The Trust has now been set up to receive GAYE donations, and our reference number is GYE 458449.  
To make a regular donation by standing order, please download a mandate from the website or contact us and we will send one to you. http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate . You can make a donation by using our secure on-line payment facility at https://secure.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate.php Please remember that completing a Gift Aid form substantially boosts your donation by 25% if you are a UK taxpayer. Yours sincerely,  Ms Ahlam M El Hattab, Trustee info@ladyfatemahtrust.org  http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/ 

Tel +44 (0) 1494 762 063, Email info@ladyfatemahtrust.org, Fax +44 (0) 1494 762 286, Mobile +44 (0) 7798 76 10 20 Website: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org 

 

This Trust operates on ZERO admin cost since 1997 and helps thousands of impoverished people around the world through projects covering education, humanitarian relief, medical assistance, basic food, water provision, eye clinics and orphan care. This email and any files transmitted with it are intended solely for the use of the individual(s) or entity to whom they are addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, you should not copy it, use it or disclose its contents. Please notify info@ladyfatemahtrust.org immediately and destroy your copy. Internet communications including e-mails cannot be guaranteed to be secure or error free. While the LFT has taken steps to control the spread of viruses on its systems it cannot guarantee that this email (including any attachments) is free of any virus or other harmful matter and accepts no responsibility for any loss or damage resulting from the recipient receiving, opening or using it.
14th
Nov
2014

Newsletter September 2014 Thul-Qedah – Thul-Hijjah 1435 A.H.


The Lady Fâtemah (a.s.) Charitable Trust

September Lodge, Village Way, Little Chalfont, Buckinghamshire, HP7 9PU

Newsletter September 2014 Thul-Qedah – Thul-Hijjah 1435 A.H.

Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  Dear Patrons This month, I would like to share with you the story of a member of the LFT family that you have assisted in Kashmir. Mohammad Siddiq is a 42-year-old construction worker who supports a family of five from his meagre wages. A few months ago he noticed blurred vision in his right eye. At work, he developed clumsiness, knocked over things and bumped into objects and people at his right side because he did not perceive them. His employer warned him to get treatment for his eye condition or be laid off. However, he was unable to afford the high cost of eye surgery. After being introduced to the free eye hospital in Akora Khattak by a neighbour, he was examined there and diagnosed with right eye cataract. Due to his difficult socio-economic situation, he was given an emergency appointment. His employer agreed to grant him sick leave until he recovered from surgery. Mohammad has now returned to his job and is happy that he can support his family as before. Besides restoring his vision, free cataract surgery performed by dedicated and caring hospital staff brought about another change in Mohammad’s life and outlook: He is now trying to help those members of his community who need support to the best of his ability  Your generosity ensured that not only will Mohammad Siddiq and his family remain free of need but that he will now be an ambassador for empowerment and support to members of his community who are needy of assistance. Orphan care In countries where war, famine or poverty is part of everyday life, millions of children are orphaned and left to struggle for survival. Over the last decade alone, armed conflict has resulted in six million children being wounded or disabled for life, and one million orphaned. The Trust has established fostering programs to care for children in India, Pakistan, Iraq, Iran and Lebanon. The orphan sponsorship program intends to reach the most destitute of families. Frequently, such families do not have access to charitable organisations or public welfare departments. Disease, ignorance or simply abject poverty prevents them from seeking assistance. In some cases, mothers simply cannot afford the cost of transportation, and find it difficult to travel if they have no one to look after their young children whilst away. The LFT focus on educating the orphan and providing skills and materials to the widows to earn their own income and become self-sufficient. This is the most effective means to empowering the orphaned child and his or her mother to escape from a lifetime of grinding poverty and need. For £30 a month, you can sponsor an orphan, and give a child the chance for a better future. Did you know that 499 orphans in the city of Karbala and a further 1,500 in other parts of Iraq who receive regular receive monthly support though your generosity and thousands more can be assisted? I strongly encourage you to pledge a donation of at least £30 per month for this project in remembrance of the orphans of the family of Imam Hussain (as) after the tragedy of Karbala.  LiFT Kashmir It’s been a month since torrential rains devastated Jammu and Kashmir; experts estimate that this is the worst flooding to affect the area in 60 years. The floodwaters have caused landslides, damaged roads, bridges, buildings, homes, and agricultural land. As a result, over one million people have been cut off from basic services. Hundreds of villages have become completely submerged and thousands of people have been rendered homeless. In addition to killing over 400 people and injuring 540 people, the floodwaters have damaged 1.68 million acres of cropland and damaged nearly 46,000 houses. While any relief effort must focus on rebuilding the area’s long-term infrastructure, there is a very real and desperate need for basic food items, clothing, and immediate shelter. The LFT has decided to focus on the former and is looking to provide basic food items to as many households as it can. With your help, it can reach out and help those suffering from unimaginable hardship, so please donate generously. LFT eye-care – Cataract Appeal Although almost no one goes blind from a cataract in the developed world, this condition is still the major cause of blindness in developing countries, where health insurance schemes are patchy or non-existent, and people are too poor to afford the cost of surgery. For a mere £15 or £30 a month, you can provide a cataract operation for someone in Pakistan or East Africa respectively, and give someone the gift of sight. Since the project began in Kashmir and Pakistan in January 2007, 11,387 people including Mohammad Siddiq whose story I told above, have benefitted from this simple operation. With your help, this number could rise and pave the way for a situation in which no one in the developing world goes blind from such an easily curable affliction. Many others have received assistance for improving eye care in Iraq and Tanzania. We continue to support the Imam Al-Hujjah Hospital in Karbala with equipment for their ophthalmology unit and would encourage you to show your support for this project by pledging the cost of purchasing one or more units of equipment. LiFT Pakistan MICT, in partnership with the LFT, has embarked on an emergency relief programme to provide immediate support to some of the worst affected victims of this year’s floods. As result of heavy monsoon rainfalls, large swathes of the country have been left devastated. According to estimates gathered by the Pakistani government and aid agencies, more than two million people have been directly affected by the floods and over 500 people have been killed as a result of them.  In addition to this, there has been unimaginable damage to private property and infrastructure. Across the Punjab province, including District Sargodha, Chiniot, Jehlum, Hafizabad, Gujranawala and the southern districts of Jhang, Khanewal, Muzaffar Garh, Multan, Layyah, and Dera Ghazi Khan, there has been large-scale damage to property and livelihoods. Graphic images on Pakistan’s TV channels serve as a daily reminder of the scale and continuing suffering of the people. Thousands of women, children and the elderly are living under the open sky, struggling to survive. Those who receive basic meals twice a day consider themselves lucky relative to those who have been left with nothing. The catastrophe has also unleashed a host of medical challenges; for example the lack of sanitation has resulted in the breakout of epidemics, and water borne diseases are rife. As a result, the LFT, in partnership with MICT has instigated a plan to help the most vulnerable members of society in specifically targeted areas. The initiative is looking to provide short-term assistance to individuals, until they can begin sowing crops and are once again able provide for themselves. The plan is being executed in a number of separate phases to ensure the maximum transparency and a targeting of the areas most in need. As in previous years, the LFT will provide food packs to families, containing supplies of basic commodities like rice, flour, cooking oil, sugar and other essential goods.  Additional items will be added depending on their availability and whether the LFT is able to raise sufficient funds. According to present estimates, each basic food pack will cost approximately 3,200 PKR and the LFT is looking to provide 2,000 families with such packs. These flood victims have lost everything – their homes, their belongings, and their livelihoods. Please donate generously, and help alleviate a small portion of their suffering. LiFT Iraq With ISIS in control of large swathes of Northern and Western Iraq, the number of refugees fleeing from their reign of terror has reached unprecedented levels. Thousands have fled to the South, where ISIS have struggled to gain a foothold. Although the number of internally displaced persons within the South is unknown, their need is clear. They have left their homes, belongings, and livelihoods behind, and live in uncertainty on how they will survive from one day to the next. Many are forced to congregate in far off locations, which makes it difficult for mainstream aid agencies to provide them with assistance. As a result, the LFT has decided to work with hundreds of families spread across tens of locations, by providing them with essential items. With the grace of God, and the receipt of thousands of dollars in donations, it has managed to provide essentials ranging from clothing to diapers and shampoo to just under 5,500 displaced people as part of Phase 1 and 2 of this project. With your continued financial support, it hopes to extend this provision in the upcoming phases, so please donate generously. Best Wishes Ms Khadija Gulamhussein, Public Relations volunteer   Gala Dinner 2014: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N-b4I-_7EzE&feature=youtu.be   Video Gallery: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/video-gallery Image gallery: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/image-gallery Solar Cooker Training: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDG-ZV8xv4w   https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/lady-fatemah-charitable-trust/id598326331?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D4   twitter.com/#!/LFTrust    http://www.facebook.com/LadyFatemahTrust   We recently registered BT’s ‘My Donate’ where you can donate to the Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust   To support the LFT’s Appeal we have now set up a system of donating to your favourite charity via your mobile phone. To donate £1 text LFCT141 to 70070; To donate £2 text LFCT142 to 70070 To donate £3 text LFCT143 to 70070; To donate £4 text LFCT144 to 70070 To donate £5 text LFCT145 to 70070; To donate £10 text LFCT1410 to 70070 The Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust is one of the first charities to use its own unique text code, LFCT14, to raise funds by using JustTextGiving. In the spirit of the LFT, this is a new service which has no set up or associated costs for the LFT and every penny donated via text goes directly to the LFT. Once your donation has gone through, you can also add Gift Aid to the donation, which we recommend as it gives us an extra 25% on your donation. From today, LFT supporter can make donations of up to £10 by texting LFCT14 and either 1,2,3,4,5 or 10 to 70070. The text message is free and all funds will go to worthy causes. Ijaza:
  • ·  
Development and Relief Foundation and Islamic Humanitarian Service:
  • · The Trust has recently entered into an agreement with Development & Relief Foundation in the US, similar to IHS in Kitchener, Ontario,
  Give As You Earn:
  • This is the UK’s largest payroll giving scheme and is administered by CAF (Charities Aid Foundation). Any employee or pensioner paid under PAYE can donate to a charitable organization in the UK. The Trust has now been set up to receive GAYE donations, and our reference number is GYE 458449.  
To make a regular donation by standing order, please download a mandate from the website or contact us and we will send one to you. http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate . You can make a donation by using our secure on-line payment facility at https://secure.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate.php Please remember that completing a Gift Aid form substantially boosts your donation by 25% if you are a UK taxpayer. Yours sincerely,  Ms Ahlam M El Hattab, Trustee info@ladyfatemahtrust.org  http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/ 

Tel +44 (0) 1494 762 063, Email info@ladyfatemahtrust.org, Fax +44 (0) 1494 762 286, Mobile +44 (0) 7798 76 10 20 Website: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org 

 

This Trust operates on ZERO admin cost since 1997 and helps thousands of impoverished people around the world through projects covering education, humanitarian relief, medical assistance, basic food, water provision, eye clinics and orphan care. This email and any files transmitted with it are intended solely for the use of the individual(s) or entity to whom they are addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, you should not copy it, use it or disclose its contents. Please notify info@ladyfatemahtrust.org immediately and destroy your copy. Internet communications including e-mails cannot be guaranteed to be secure or error free. While the LFT has taken steps to control the spread of viruses on its systems it cannot guarantee that this email (including any attachments) is free of any virus or other harmful matter and accepts no responsibility for any loss or damage resulting from the recipient receiving, opening or using it.
1st
Jan
1970

Newsletter July 2014 Ramadhan / Shawwal 1435 A.H


The Lady Fâtemah (a.s.) Charitable Trust

September Lodge, Village Way, Little Chalfont, Buckinghamshire, HP7 9PU

Newsletter July 2014 Ramadhan / Shawwal 1435 A.H.

Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ Dear Patrons Eid Mubarak to you all. I pray that the blessing of the Holy Month lives with you all year round. I thank you for your generosity during the Holy Month that enabled the LFT to reach out to 10,000 of individuals during this special time of the month. This month, I would like to share with you the story of Dr Till Mostowlansky, Institute for the Science of Religion and Central Asian Studies from University of Bern, Switzerland who visited one of the LFT’s water projects in Lucknow, India. From New Dehli, India, he said: “In the course of my talks with the LFT’s individual beneficiaries who have benefitted from medical support provided by the trust, I could see that small-scale interventions and direct, unbureaucratic help can make a big difference. All of the individuals I met were pleased with LFCT’s fast help in situations of emergency when other organisations simply failed to react promptly. At the same time, they also emphasised that it was LFT’s humble appearance that positively surprised them; neither did the trust use their cases for publicity nor did any of the LFT’s collaborators try to push themselves to the fore. While LFT’s direct medical support focuses on individual cases, I also had the chance to      become familiar with one of the LFT’s more extensive projects in Lucknow. The project site is the waqf “Karbala Khuda Meer Baksh” which includes an estimated 23 acres of land. Problems on the waqf are twofold: on the one hand, the waqf’s trustee lets homeless families reside on the plot. Even though this is essential for the families’ survival many of them did not have proper housing, sanitation or access to clean water until recently. LFT has, along with other donors, provided houses and water tanks, and thus improved people’s day-to-day lives. On the other hand, the waqf is, as many others in the region, endangered by land grabbers. The construction of houses along the boundaries of the plot prevents land grabbing and therefore also protects a cultural institution and its centuries old history. During my visit to the waqf and my talk to its trustee and his co-workers, it became evident that this site provides various opportunities for further collaboration. A school for the waqf’s growing number of children will be needed in the future and the construction of a small road    through the plot will grant access to the residential areas.” LiFTaar With the grace of God, and your generous support, the LFT has been able to provide food assistance to over 14,500 families during the holy month of Ramadhan. For these impoverished families, normally the source of every meal is uncertain. But for one month, with your generous support, they felt reassured that they would have something to feed their children for Iftaar. No person should have to go without food, but it’s a sad reality of the world in which we live. We thank God that, with your help, we were able to diminish a small proportion of the global hunger and malnutrition that inflicts large parts of the world this Ramadhan. Gaza Strip From 29 June, the LFT began providing daily Iftaar for needy families of students at the Atfaluna School for the Deaf in Gaza. Freshly prepared meals consisted of nutritional items like chicken, rice, and vegetables. Since the devastating bombardment that started on 8 July and has to date, claimed the lives of 1,600 people, the restaurant at the school began serving Iftaar to up to 1,000 displaced refugees who had fled, once again, from their home by the actions of the Israeli military.  The people of Gaza desperately need your help. Their infrastructure and healthcare system is on the verge of collapse. UNWRA, the UN Works and Reliefs Agency, which was set up to help Palestinian refugees, has said that the current situation is beyond their ability and resources to manage. Please find it in your hearts to donate generously to this cause. Iraqi & Afghan refugees The LFT was fortunate enough to distribute 1,584 food baskets to Iraqi and Afghan refugees in ten locations during the month of Ramadhan. This exercise resulted in food aid being distributed to over 8,465 people over the course of the month. Food baskets included rice, cooking oil, sugar, tomato pulses, and tea and the total cost of the distribution came to just over £35,000. Pakistan With the grace of the Almighty, for the sixth year running, the Trust was able to reach out to over 8,000 of the most deserving families in the Rawalpindi district of Punjab. This year’s untimely rainfall in northern Pakistan brought about an unexpected emergency as many poor families in remote rural areas lost parts of the wheat crop, which was about to be harvested. Consequently, already malnourished families were further pushed in to deprivation. Keeping this reality in mind, half the LiFTaar distributions were made in villages around the northern town of Murree where the effects of the rain related destruction were felt the hardest, while the other half of the distributions went to impoverished individuals living in a shanty location in the city of Rawalpindi. Kenya This year, in conjunction with our local partners in Kenya, we reached over 400 impoverished families in Samburu, 62 kilometers from Mombasa in Kenya. The beneficiaries were members of the Mijikenda tribe who are traditionally subsistence farmers. Their traditional cash crops include the coconut palm for its oil and the palm fronds for roofing, baskets and other woven materials. When the weather is favourable they also grow cashew nuts, oranges and mangoes. Unfortunately, they suffered crop shortages this year due to inconsistent rainfall leading to a drought. The food parcels provided to the beneficiaries included maize flour, wheat flour and cooking oil to enable them to prepare their traditional meals during the holy month Lebanon . By the grace of God, LFT was able to distribute over 10,000 food rations in Lebanon during the Holy Month of Ramadhan. Further details of the actual food included in the distribution and the towns to the distribution have yet to be received and this information will be shared once we have the detailed reports. LiFT: Lebanon   The LFT has been given a generous donation of $350,000 (CAD) worth of mobility equipment to provide to the disabled in South Lebanon. The LFT has begun distributing the equipment to a range of deserving recipients, including children and the elderly. Some of those who have been assisted were handicapped as a result of war. LiFT: Water aid   The LFT is seeking funds to provide water tanks and hand pumps to the residents of Karbala Talkatora Meer Khuda Buxh in Lucknow City. The water facilities would benefit approximately 100 houses and the plans include proposals to 2 borings with hand pumps. The total cost of the project, which would phenomenally change the lives of the residents of this village is just under £2,000. In a country where 92 million people do not have access to clean water, and a child dies every 20 seconds from a water related disease, the LFT humbly and passionately asks you to donate. LIFT: Solar Power The LFT has distributed 1,000 solar stoves to impoverished families in the Tharparkar District of Pakistan. A further 2,000 stoves are expected to be distributed now that Ramadhan is over. Over 90% of the residents in this District live in rural villages and a very large part of the District consists of the Thar Desert which has the lowest Human Development Index score of all the Districts in Sindh. Please continue with your generous contribution to enable these and many more projects to continue. Ms Khadija Gulamhussein, Public Relations volunteer   Gala Dinner 2014: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N-b4I-_7EzE&feature=youtu.be   Video Gallery: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/video-gallery Image gallery: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/image-gallery Solar Cooker Training: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDG-ZV8xv4w   https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/lady-fatemah-charitable-trust/id598326331?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D4   twitter.com/#!/LFTrust    http://www.facebook.com/LadyFatemahTrust   We recently registered BT’s ‘My Donate’ where you can donate to the Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust   To support the LFT’s Appeal we have now set up a system of donating to your favourite charity via your mobile phone. To donate £1 text LFCT141 to 70070 To donate £2 text LFCT142 to 70070 To donate £3 text LFCT143 to 70070 To donate £4 text LFCT144 to 70070 To donate £5 text LFCT145 to 70070 To donate £10 text LFCT1410 to 70070 The Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust is one of the first charities to use its own unique text code, LFCT14, to raise funds by using JustTextGiving. In the spirit of the LFT, this is a new service which has no set up or associated costs for the LFT and every penny donated via text goes directly to the LFT. Once your donation has gone through, you can also add Gift Aid to the donation, which we recommend as it gives us an extra 25% on your donation. From today, LFT supporter can make donations of up to £10 by texting LFCT14 and either 1,2,3,4,5 or 10 to 70070. The text message is free and all funds will go to worthy causes. Ijaza:
  • ·  
Development and Relief Foundation and Islamic Humanitarian Service:
  • · The Trust has recently entered into an agreement with Development & Relief Foundation in the US, similar to IHS in Kitchener, Ontario,
  Give As You Earn:
  • This is the UK’s largest payroll giving scheme and is administered by CAF (Charities Aid Foundation). Any employee or pensioner paid under PAYE can donate to a charitable organization in the UK. The Trust has now been set up to receive GAYE donations, and our reference number is GYE 458449.  
To make a regular donation by standing order, please download a mandate from the website or contact us and we will send one to you. http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate . You can make a donation by using our secure on-line payment facility at https://secure.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate.php Please remember that completing a Gift Aid form substantially boosts your donation by 25% if you are a UK taxpayer. Yours sincerely,  Ms Ahlam M El Hattab, Trustee info@ladyfatemahtrust.org  http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/ 

Tel +44 (0) 1494 762 063, Email info@ladyfatemahtrust.org, Fax +44 (0) 1494 762 286, Mobile +44 (0) 7798 76 10 20 Website: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org 

 

This Trust operates on ZERO admin cost since 1997 and helps thousands of impoverished people around the world through projects covering education, humanitarian relief, medical assistance, basic food, water provision, eye clinics and orphan care. This email and any files transmitted with it are intended solely for the use of the individual(s) or entity to whom they are addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, you should not copy it, use it or disclose its contents. Please notify info@ladyfatemahtrust.org immediately and destroy your copy. Internet communications including e-mails cannot be guaranteed to be secure or error free. While the LFT has taken steps to control the spread of viruses on its systems it cannot guarantee that this email (including any attachments) is free of any virus or other harmful matter and accepts no responsibility for any loss or damage resulting from the recipient receiving, opening or using it.
1st
Jan
1970

Newsletter June 2014 Shaban / Ramadhan 1435 A.H.


The Lady Fâtemah (a.s.) Charitable Trust

September Lodge, Village Way, Little Chalfont, Buckinghamshire, HP7 9PU

Newsletter June 2014 Shaban / Ramadhan 1435 A.H.

Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ Dear Patrons ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ Ramadhan Mubarak to you all. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ As we enjoy the blessings of being the Guests of the Merciful one at the banquet of Ramadhan, and gather together to break our fasts as families and communities, let us spare a moment for those for whom hunger and thirst are an all year round reality. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ In the past few weeks we have seen thousands more refugees flee their homes adding to the millions who have lived in temporary shelters for years. Often the education of their children is disrupted the vulnerability of these families is exploited by uncouth businessmen and women who employ them to work long days in factories. Sometimes this is even presented as an act of charity saying it is necessary to do in order to put food on their tables. These vulnerable families have much worse access to healthcare facilities meaning they are made to needlessly suffer for ailments that are easily curable. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ However, as Guests of the Merciful one during this month, I invite you to ask – would you desire this for your own family? ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ Despite their meagre shelters in the sweltering heat and basic medical facilities, having suffered long days of menial labour, these brothers and sisters in faith will be fasting like us during the Holy month – will you lighten their burden by ensuring they get one square meal a day for iftaar? With the #LiFTaar scheme from the LFT, we have embarked on an even wider program of distribution of Iftaar to needy families around the world including orphans and widowed families. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  Having felt some of their hunger and thirst let us reach out to help them in this special month, and see how we can empower them to lead better lives all year round. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  Iftaar Charity dinner to raise funds for fresh water – the gift of pure water during the Holy Month   ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  This Ramadan the volunteers of the Lady Fatemah Trust are getting together to give the gift of a lifetime: clean water. Join us for a a wonderful evening of delicious Turkish food, inspiring words and an opportunity to truly change the lives of hundreds. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  Date:    12th July 2014 starting at 8pm. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  At: Antalya Restaurant (London), 103-105 Southampton Row, London WC1B 4HH ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  Tickets: £35.00 ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  To be part of this incredible opportunity you can BUY A TICKET and/or DONATE towards a well at: http://www.tickettailor.com/checkout/view-event/id/15686/chk/7d22  ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  Water is essential for life, and yet, more than 30% of people around the globe cannot access safe drinking water. More than 3.4 million people die each year from water, sanitation, and hygiene-related causes. Nearly all deaths, 99% occur in the developing world. The water and sanitation crisis claims more lives through disease than any war claims through guns. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  Without the assurance of regular water supply, communities rely either on small to mid-sized pumps which draw water from beneath the surface or on the generosity of nature when it rains. Women and children must regularly travel several miles on foot every day to collect water from the few scattered water holes in the area. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  Get involved and help us bring water and transform the health of thousands of people. These wells will provide consistent access and supply of drinking water. This means the sanitation conditions in these villages will be improved. So let’s reap the rewards of the best form of ‘on-going’ charity. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  LiFTaar – Pakistan   With the grace of the Almighty, for the sixth year running, the Trust has been able to reach out to over 8,000 of the most deserving families in the Rawalpindi district of Punjab. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  This years’ untimely rainfall in northern Pakistan brought about an unexpected emergency as many poor families in remote rural areas lost parts of the wheat crop which was about to be harvested. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  Consequently, already malnourished families were further pushed in to deprivation beyond their already impoverished status. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  Keeping this reality in mind, half the LiFTaar distributions were made in villages around the northern town of Murree where the effects of the rain related destruction were felt the hardest, while the other half of the distributions went to impoverished individuals living in a shanty location in the city of Rawalpindi. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  The food parcels include lentils, rice, tea, ghee, flour, sugar and cost £20 per family. The cost of the whole program in Pakistan can be sponsored in part or as a whole by donating £20,000. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  The beneficiaries included the elderly, widows, orphans and single mothers. Given that the effects of the ongoing calamity are far from over, the LFT will continue to work with our local partners to support as many of these families as we can to reestablish themselves in an empowering, independent and sustainable manner. Food distribution – Syrian refugees and Iraqi orphans and widows   The plight of the Syrian refugees in neighbouring countries continues to present huge challenges for the refugees as well as their hosts in the neighbouring countries. Everyday items such as water, food, housing and education are heavily strained by the huge influx. From our previous updates you will be familiar with some of the longer term redevelopment work we are engaged in through creating economic activities such as a grocery store and a garments factory. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  However, the need for immediate assistance remains and this Ramadhan, we have worked with our local partners to distribute staple food items for iftaar to Syrian refugee families as well as those affected by the economic hardships of accommodating them. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  Whilst we await the final reports of the distribution from our local partners, we expect this to cover several villages and the food parcels will be distributed according to the family size of the recipients. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  In total the following quantities are expected to be distributed: 25,000 kilos of pasta, 161,000 kilos of rice, 25,000 kilos of chick peas, 75,000 kilos lentil (green and red) together with appropriate quantities of sunflower oil and tomato paste. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  The increased wave of violence in Iraq has created millions of internally displaced persons moving to the south of the country. During the month we will distribute 92,000 kilos of rice to the needy including orphans and widows. As we are working to improve the lives of the orphans (including street children) we are working with this year we have designated the Year of the Orphan we will ensure as far as possible that their nutritional needs are met. The rice will be packed in 10 kilo bags and will be distributed in Karbala and the surrounding areas [including the Southern Marshlands]. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  Having felt some of their hunger and thirst let us reach out to assist them. The cost per family LiFTaar – Kenya and water projects in Tanzania   ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  This year in conjunction with our local partners in Kenya, your generosity will reach over 400 families in Samburu, 62 kilometers from Mombasa in Kenya. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  The beneficiaries who are members of the Mijikenda tribe are traditionally subsistence farmers. Their traditional cash crops include the coconut palm for its oil and the palm fronds for roofing, baskets and other woven materials. When the weather is favourable they also grow cashew nuts, oranges and mangoes. Unfortunately, they have suffered crop shortages this year due to inconsistent rainfall leading to a drought. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­  The food parcels provided to the beneficiaries will include maize flour, wheat flour and cooking oil to enable them to prepare their traditional meals during the holy month. This would cost £20 per family for the month or £8,000 to feed the whole village for the month. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ Our long standing patrons are aware that the Lady Fatemah Trust has embarked on over 170 water projects since inception. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ During this month, whilst we feel the thirst of those fasting, we would invite you to participate in supporting the sixth phase of supplying needy communities on the island of Pemba with fresh drinking water. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ The trust has embarked on the construction of the infrastructure for water supply to a number of communities in Pemba in conjunction with the local governorate. This month we would like you to consider sponsoring a part of the provision of water to Pungua, Mtemani, & Maungani districts at a total cost of £7,000. Why not partner with family and friends to make the supply of fresh water a reality for the residents of this remote community and enable them to carry on with normal life, irrigating their crops, washing and drinking. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ The absence of water to a community means they are more likely to dehydrate, be less able to take care of their personal hygiene as well as wash their clothes and unable to grow subsistence crops to feed their own families. This makes them more prone to disease, hunger and higher dependency on handouts. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ LiFTaar – Gaza City, Gaza The Lady Fatemah Trust has co-operated with the Atfaluna Deaf School Community in Gaza for a number of years now. Due to their disability, these young children and their teachers have felt the effect of the inhumane economic blockade more than the other residents of Gaza and are often more traumatised due to their inability to express themselves. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ Over the years, your generosity has meant that they have received batteries for their hearing equipment, regular sponsorship for the orphans amongst them, gifts for Eid consisting of stationery supplies for their school. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ This year, due to an acute shortage of cooking gas in the region, families have not been able to cook iftaar for the families of the deaf children. As a result, the LFT have supported their local partners to ensure that 90 families, consisting of approximately 10 members of the extended family are fed daily iftaar for the duration of the month. The meals will also be cooked by the families of the deaf society and will be a good income generation for them. Consequently further benefit will be received by the needy who will be empowered to look after their own families. I remind you once again, having felt some of their hunger, will you reach out to assist them? The cost of feeding a family of 10 for the whole month is approximately £6 per person per day. This equates to £180 per person for the whole month or £1,800 per extended family for the month. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ LiFTaar – London, United Kingdom We recognise the command of the Holy Prophet as practiced by his Noble Family, including Lady Fatemah (as) in feeding the needy in their neighbourhood regardless of their faith, purely based on their need. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ This Ramadhan we are pleased to support the noble work of the Al-Mizan Charitable Trust in providing groceries of staples of rice, lentils and pasta, tinned fruit and vegetables and savoury and sweet snacks to last a typical family one week. We have committed to supporting 50 families and with your generosity can reach out to even more. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ The families are selected purely based on their need and include refugees, abused women and children, those struggling to get employment. They are assisted by our partner organisation for longer term rehabilitation. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ The Holy Quran immortalises the devotion of the Prophet’s family in the verses that attest to their feeding the orphan, the refugee and the poor. Their actions were attributed solely to seeking pleasure from Allah, not desiring any gratitude or acknowledgement from the beneficiaries. Our partners have been selected for their sincerity in carrying out these acts of devotion. You can further support this work by contributing £40 to support a weekly food parcel. A total of £20,000 would support the whole program and benefit 500 families during this Noble Month. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ We believe that recognising the difficulties of the needy families in our locality is an integral part of our Ramadhan commemoration and we would encourage you to be generous in this Holy Month to provide food to the needy both in the UK as well as the other countries in which we operate. Gala Dinner 2014: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N-b4I-_7EzE&feature=youtu.be Video Gallery: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/video-gallery Image gallery: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/image-gallery Solar Cooker Training: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDG-ZV8xv4w https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/lady-fatemah-charitable-trust/id598326331?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D4 twitter.com/#!/LFTrust http://www.facebook.com/LadyFatemahTrust We recently registered BT’s ‘My Donate’ where you can donate to the Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust To support the LFT’s Appeal we have now set up a system of donating to your favourite charity via your mobile phone. To donate £1 text LFCT141 to 70070 To donate £2 text LFCT142 to 70070 To donate £3 text LFCT143 to 70070 To donate £4 text LFCT144 to 70070 To donate £5 text LFCT145 to 70070 To donate £10 text LFCT1410 to 70070 The Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust is one of the first charities to use its own unique text code, LFCT14, to raise funds by using JustTextGiving. In the spirit of the LFT, this is a new service which has no set up or associated costs for the LFT and every penny donated via text goes directly to the LFT. Once your donation has gone through, you can also add Gift Aid to the donation, which we recommend as it gives us an extra 25% on your donation. From today, LFT supporter can make donations of up to £10 by texting LFCT14 and either 1,2,3,4,5 or 10 to 70070. The text message is free and all funds will go to worthy causes. Ijaza:
  • ·
Development and Relief Foundation and Islamic Humanitarian Service:
  • · The Trust has recently entered into an agreement with Development & Relief Foundation in the US, similar to IHS in Kitchener, Ontario,
Give As You Earn:
  • This is the UK’s largest payroll giving scheme and is administered by CAF (Charities Aid Foundation). Any employee or pensioner paid under PAYE can donate to a charitable organization in the UK. The Trust has now been set up to receive GAYE donations, and our reference number is GYE 458449.
To make a regular donation by standing order, please download a mandate from the website or contact us and we will send one to you. http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate . You can make a donation by using our secure on-line payment facility at https://secure.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate.php Please remember that completing a Gift Aid form substantially boosts your donation by 25% if you are a UK taxpayer. Yours sincerely, Ms Ahlam M El Hattab, Trustee info@ladyfatemahtrust.org http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/

Tel +44 (0) 1494 762 063, Email info@ladyfatemahtrust.org, Fax +44 (0) 1494 762 286, Mobile +44 (0) 7798 76 10 20 Website: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org

This Trust operates on ZERO admin cost since 1997 and helps thousands of impoverished people around the world through projects covering education, humanitarian relief, medical assistance, basic food, water provision, eye clinics and orphan care. This email and any files transmitted with it are intended solely for the use of the individual(s) or entity to whom they are addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, you should not copy it, use it or disclose its contents. Please notify info@ladyfatemahtrust.org immediately and destroy your copy. Internet communications including e-mails cannot be guaranteed to be secure or error free. While the LFT has taken steps to control the spread of viruses on its systems it cannot guarantee that this email (including any attachments) is free of any virus or other harmful matter and accepts no responsibility for any loss or damage resulting from the recipient receiving, opening or using it.
3rd
Dec
2014

Newsletter November 2014 Muharram – Safar 1435 A.H.


The Lady Fâtemah (a.s.) Charitable Trust

September Lodge, Village Way, Little Chalfont, Buckinghamshire, HP7 9PU

Newsletter November 2014 Muharram – Safar 1435 A.H.

Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ Dear Patrons In memory of Imam Hussain’s (as) valiant stand for human rights, we have dedicated this month’s update to your efforts in preserving human dignity through the work of the Trust. LFT Water! – Students at Harrow Primary School donate Hand pump in Dheri Maira near Havelian, Abbottabad, Pakistan The Trust would like to recognise the efforts of the students at Harrow School in raising funds and selecting this locality and school for the supply of clean water in memory of Imam Hussain (as). Access to clean water as a basic human right is recognised universally. The threat of dehydration and use of contaminated water for drinking or cleaning is intolerable in the 21st century, when we have the technologies to identify unpolluted sources of water and the mechanisms for extracting it. The efforts of the students at Harrow School provided for the cost of digging the borehole and installing a hand pump, as well as other amenities required. Prior to this, residents in Dheri Mairi faced acute difficulties in accessing clean, sanitised water from the local environment. This project means that the total number of water projects undertaken by the Trust now exceeds 200, with thousands of beneficiaries in India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Tanzania, and Palestine. In addition to building water wells and boreholes, projects to provide water coolers in Palestine and water treatment tablets in Lebanon mean that the Trust has been able to provide pure, easily accessible water to thousands of people, regardless of their religion or race. As a follow-up, the Trust would like to invite you to donate to the following upcoming water projects:-
  1. A water project to provide farmers on Pemba Island, Tanzania, with water to rear their cattle and generate their own income sources; and
  2. A water project to supply residents in the marshlands of Southern Iraq with the means to purify the saline water that surrounds them, simply and effectively.
LiFT Educate! The Trust, in conjunction with MICT in Pakistan, has continued with a project to improve the skills of teachers from Pakistan’s largely impoverished northern Gilgit-Baltistan region. An intervention that costs approximately £200.00/US$300.00 per teacher goes a long way in lifting the prospects and skills of these teachers and consequently helping students gain valuable life skills. In the Gilgit-Baltistan region, school places are very hard to come, and where school facilities are available, large classroom sizes and a lack of teacher training means that the student experience is less than optimal. This project delivers one of the best returns on investment in individuals, and testimonials from both students and teachers on its utility has been extremely positive. Going forward, it is the Trust’s intention to continue expanding this activity as a matter of high priority. The USWA school system has been of benefit to thousands of students across one of Pakistan’s most impoverished areas, and by improving the skills of teachers working with communities in remote areas, we hope to enhance the quality of education in one of Pakistan’s most deprived regions. LFT Humanitarian – IDPs of Iraq   The ongoing acts of terror in Syria and Iraq have not only created the greatest number of external refugees from these countries (thereby putting a huge burden on local communities in Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey and other neighboring countries), but has also left millions of Iraqis and Syrians displaced within their own countries. Both internally and externally displaced people from these two countries are struggling to access adequate housing, effective education and a means to earn their living. According to the “Internal Displacement Monitoring Center”, the number of internally displaced persons (“IDPs”) in Iraq has now reached almost three million. This means that approximately one in ten Iraqis have been forced to flee from violence and armed conflict and seek refuge elsewhere in their country. In September 2014, following an appeal from the Iraqi charity organization Khoddame Eitame Aale Mohammad, clothing, slippers, infant formula, disposable diapers and some hygiene and household goods were purchased by the LFCT with funds from a single generous donation of $30,000, as well as a large number of other private donations amounting to $13,000. These items were distributed to 529 IDP families (2,824 persons). An additional $27,512 donated by charitable individuals, was distributed as cash assistance to 301 IDP families (1,590 persons) living in 17 locations in the Baghdad and Waset provinces. With winter coming, IDPs who fled with only the clothes they were wearing, are still in need of assistance. While Iraq has a hot and dry climate during most of the year, temperatures drop to near freezing point during the winter months, between December to March. Khoddame Eitame Aale Mohammad Charity is now urgently appealing for kerosene heaters and blankets for 500 displaced families living in Baghdad and Hilleh, to enable them to keep warm during the cold winter days and nights. Each family will receive a heater and a blanket for every two persons, and warm sweaters and trousers will also be purchased for children. The intended beneficiary families are some of the most vulnerable members of society, and include widows and orphaned children; the LFT humbly requests that you donate to ensure they stay warm and safe during these challenging times. LiFT Empower – Refugees in Indonesia assisted with microfinance to encourage self-sustainability   Khadijah is an intelligent young woman and a diligent worker; her father Sayed Ibrahim Syahab was one of Madura’s Shiite clerics who passed away seven years ago, placing the weight of responsiblility for Khadija’s mother and two younger siblings on her shoulders. Prior to the tragedy of the Shia community in Madura, Khadijah ran her own business and was an experienced tailor. However, her business, equipment, raw materials and capital were burned and looted during attacks by terrorist organisations on Shia businesses in the area. Khadijah now runs a small scale business from home, struggling to make ends meet and keep the business running. With net income of $70- $80 per month, Khadijah not only supports her family, but also employs four female refugees from Sampang Madura, on a salary of $30-$50 for each worker. With the present income she generates, Khadijah needs to support the day-to-day living expenses of her family as well as the the education of her two younger siblings; as a result, with education costs of approximately $90-$120 per month, Khadijah is reliant on the assistance of generous donors to cover the shortfall. In response to her situation, Khadijah applied to the LFCT for microfinance assistance. Upon review of her situation and proposals for the use of the loan, the LFCT felt that the business model was sound and would provide an effective solution to Khadijah’s situation as well as an opportunity to generate further jobs for other women. With the LFCT microfinance loan, Khadija will be able to sell directly to wholesalers, increase revenue, and in turn not only benefit her own family, but also create new jobs to help other women also struggling to survive. With this project, we aim to empower Khadijah, an orphaned refugee, who was named after the entrepreneurial wife of Prophet Muhammad. With your support inshaAllah, Khadijah will be able to become both self-sufficient and empower more women in her community.  These women will in turn support their families, putting food on their tables through their own effort, and providing a better future for their children, and the other women that they work with. This is a far more empowering and dignified form of assistance than intervening with short term measures that don’t address the root of the problem and allow it to persist. We thank you for your continued prayers and support. We frequently receive prayers for our patrons and their families from those they have selflessly reached out to assist. Ms Khadija Gulamhussein, Public Relations volunteer   Gala Dinner 2014: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N-b4I-_7EzE&feature=youtu.be   Video Gallery: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/video-gallery Image gallery: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/image-gallery Solar Cooker Training: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDG-ZV8xv4w   https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/lady-fatemah-charitable-trust/id598326331?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D4   twitter.com/#!/LFTrust    http://www.facebook.com/LadyFatemahTrust   We recently registered BT’s ‘My Donate’ where you can donate to the Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust   To support the LFT’s Appeal we have now set up a system of donating to your favourite charity via your mobile phone. To donate £1 text LFCT141 to 70070; To donate £2 text LFCT142 to 70070 To donate £3 text LFCT143 to 70070; To donate £4 text LFCT144 to 70070 To donate £5 text LFCT145 to 70070; To donate £10 text LFCT1410 to 70070 The Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust is one of the first charities to use its own unique text code, LFCT14, to raise funds by using JustTextGiving. In the spirit of the LFT, this is a new service which has no set up or associated costs for the LFT and every penny donated via text goes directly to the LFT. Once your donation has gone through, you can also add Gift Aid to the donation, which we recommend as it gives us an extra 25% on your donation. From today, LFT supporter can make donations of up to £10 by texting LFCT14 and either 1,2,3,4,5 or 10 to 70070. The text message is free and all funds will go to worthy causes. Ijaza:
  • ·  
Development and Relief Foundation and Islamic Humanitarian Service:
  • · The Trust has recently entered into an agreement with Development & Relief Foundation in the US, similar to IHS in Kitchener, Ontario,
  Give As You Earn:
  • This is the UK’s largest payroll giving scheme and is administered by CAF (Charities Aid Foundation). Any employee or pensioner paid under PAYE can donate to a charitable organization in the UK. The Trust has now been set up to receive GAYE donations, and our reference number is GYE 458449.  
To make a regular donation by standing order, please download a mandate from the website or contact us and we will send one to you. http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate . You can make a donation by using our secure on-line payment facility at https://secure.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate.php Please remember that completing a Gift Aid form substantially boosts your donation by 25% if you are a UK taxpayer. Yours sincerely,  Ms Ahlam M El Hattab, Trustee info@ladyfatemahtrust.org  http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/ 

Tel +44 (0) 1494 762 063, Email info@ladyfatemahtrust.org, Fax +44 (0) 1494 762 286, Mobile +44 (0) 7798 76 10 20 Website: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org 

 

This Trust operates on ZERO admin cost since 1997 and helps thousands of impoverished people around the world through projects covering education, humanitarian relief, medical assistance, basic food, water provision, eye clinics and orphan care. This email and any files transmitted with it are intended solely for the use of the individual(s) or entity to whom they are addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, you should not copy it, use it or disclose its contents. Please notify info@ladyfatemahtrust.org immediately and destroy your copy. Internet communications including e-mails cannot be guaranteed to be secure or error free. While the LFT has taken steps to control the spread of viruses on its systems it cannot guarantee that this email (including any attachments) is free of any virus or other harmful matter and accepts no responsibility for any loss or damage resulting from the recipient receiving, opening or using it.
31st
Dec
2014

Newsletter December 2014 Safar – Rabi Al Awwal 1436 A.H.


The Lady Fâtemah (a.s.) Charitable Trust

September Lodge, Village Way, Little Chalfont, Buckinghamshire, HP7 9PU

Newsletter December 2014 Safar – Rabi Al Awwal 1436 A.H.

Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem

­­­­­­­­­­­  Dear Patrons – Salaamun Alaikum As the year 2014 draws to a close and people all around the world will be celebrating the start of a New Year, let us spare a thought for the less privileged around the world. For millions of family, the New Year will be a continuum of the challenges faced in past years with no hope of a change in their circumstances in 2015. With your support in previous years we can continue to transform lives and for some families your reaching out to them in 2015 will be the difference between a life of self-sufficient independence and a struggle for basic survival. So why not start the New Year on a benevolent note and Donate a Day’s Salary for a blessed 2015. Go on, make 2015 the Year of Change for as many lives as you can. LiFT Orphan Care in the Year of the Orphaned Child As the year draws to an end, we take stock of how the Trust was able to increase its efforts in caring for the orphaned child. You will recall that the 1st January 2014 coincided with the death anniversary of the most famous orphan to have walked the planet. That was none other than the father of Lady Fatemah (as), Prophet Muhammad (pbuh). The Trust continued to sponsor orphans in Iraq with 499 orphans sponsored in the City of Karbala and another 500+ sponsored other parts of the country. Iraq not had a great number of orphaned children from the wars fought in 1980-8 and the failed invasion of Kuwait and the uprisings in 1991, but since the fall of the former regime in 2003, suicide bombings across the country have orphaned 100,000s more innocent lives. The Trust ensures that the orphans it supports get adequate education and are supported through their schooling. Millions more children have been orphaned through the violence in Syria and Iraq. The Trust has worked to ensure that the refugees in Lebanon as well as Internally Displaced refugees in Iraq are fed and clothed. A high proportion of the children in these supported groups are orphans. The Trust’s collaboration with the Development and Relief Foundation (“DRF”) Karbala has ensured collaboration between the two humanitarian organisations and assistance in the collection of funds for DRF’s visionary work in the schooling of orphans and the opening in 2015 of a state of the art hospital in Karbala which we report on further below. Additionally, the Trust has pledged to support a further 10 orphaned girls in Lebanon through to the University education. The educational progress of these girls is being supported through the capable aegis of the Imam Sadr Foundation with whom the Trust has partnered on a number of welfare projects in healthcare and orphan support. The Trust was very fortunate to have the UN Ambassador for Street Children and the patron for Charities supporting Street Children, Vartan Melkonian address the LFT Gala Dinner 2014. Vartan’s inspirational personal journey from the slums of Beirut and to his rise as an acclaimed professional who has always supported the underprivileged orphans who end up living on the streets was truly inspirational. The Trust continues to work with partners to support as many orphaned children who are reduced to eking out a living on the streets to be sheltered, clothed and educated and we will continue to work to find solutions for these vulnerable orphans particularly in the City of Karbala where young boys end up working as porters to pilgrims to earn less than US$1 a day instead of going to school. This year’s focus on the life of an orphaned child has helped us identify areas for greater support and empowerment to these young lives to ensure they achieve their optimal potential in life, socially, morally, spiritually and economically. Your generous support ensures that the work of the tireless workers on the ground is made possible. LiFT micro-finance and education The Trust was founded on the empowering ethos of enabling financial self-sufficiency through micro-finance, education and healthcare. This year, the Trust ensured that its partner organisation in Lebanon stopped exploiting the labour of Syrian refugee children in its sewing machine factory in Lebanon. The huge influx of over 1 million refugees in each of Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey have placed a tremendous strain on their hosts countries and valuable resources such as access to clean water, food, clothing, shelter and education remain stretched. The LFT has supplied vital necessity food items to refugees from Syria who have sought shelter in Lebanon. Much more can be done and we appeal to the generosity of our donors to enable us to increase our activities in this field. We will continue to form capable partnerships to devise and deliver innovative solutions for these vulnerable refugees so a generation of Syrian children are not lost to the violence in their native country. Our partners are looking at establishing numeracy and literacy classes to ensure the children’s competence in these vital skills are not lost. As a focus area for economic empowerment in 2015, as a lesson learnt from Lebanon, we have requested all our partners to ensure that none of the projects of the Trust should either be exploiting children as labourers or importing slave labour from other countries paying them less than the natives of that country. Equal pay for equal work should remain the ethos of a charity that was set up to empower the needy and any form of exploitation of the vulnerable cannot be associated with this Trust. Our partner organisations in all the countries we work with have requested all partner organisations to sign up to the interfaith pledge made in the Vatican City by leaders of all main faith groups to work towards the abolition of slavery in all its forms. In launching the initiative, Pope Francis said: “Therefore, we declare on each and every one of our creeds that modern slavery, in terms of human trafficking, forced labour and prostitution, and organ trafficking, is a crime against humanity. Its victims are from all walks of life, but are most frequently among the poorest and most vulnerable of our brothers and sisters. On behalf of all of them, our communities of faith are called to reject, without exception, any systematic deprivation of individual freedom for the purposes of personal or commercial exploitation; in their name, we make this declaration.” The Trust wholeheartedly backs this declaration and will continue to ensure that the ethos of the Trust is upheld in the work it does to support this historic initiative. Your support to ensure viable microfinance initiatives such as animal husbandry in Pakistan, Kenya and Tanzania as well as teacher empowerment in Pakistan continue to increase the empowerment of the communities. LiFT educate! – Gaza City, Gaza Trust implemented a supplemental lunch program for children attending the Atfaluna School for the Deaf.  The objective of the program is to provide a nutritious hot meal daily for 300 deaf students to supplement the meagre nutrition the students received at home. Due to the severe economic situation caused by the ongoing tightened siege imposed on the Gaza Strip, our partners requested funding from the Trust when it became clear that the children were simply not getting enough food to eat at home and were coming to school hungry, unable to concentrate, and with all the physical signs of under-nutrition. The lack of proper nutrition was affecting the children’s school performance and energy levels. The LFCT grant allowed ASDC to purchase fresh vegetables and fruits, pulses, pasta, fresh meat, chicken, etc. The Atfaluna kitchen staff prepared tasty meals which were very much liked by the children. A typical meal was a vegetable and meat stew, rice, salad, bread, pasta, and piece of fruit.  Some of the children asked for second and third helpings which seemed to be a clear indication of how vitally important the school lunch program is.  The speed at which the meals were consumed also spoke for itself. The Atfaluna School Councillor, Mariam Al Qatshan, was able to give a comprehensive picture of the student’s progress in class throughout the academic year. Upon discussing the student’s development, Mariam said: “Most of the children in the school are from very poor families, many of them come to school having had nothing to eat from the last meal they ate at Atfaluna. Families would hope to be able to provide their children with nutritious meals to keep them healthy, however, daily financial struggles leaves them unable to provide for their children’s basic needs.  Most of deaf students enrolled at Atfaluna School have visible signs of malnutrition. Most of them have low concentration levels in class and continuous fatigue. Prior the program, the students had little food to eat all day and barely had energy to concentrate. Teachers noted that the children would often day dream in class and complain of dizziness due to prolonged hunger.”  Amany the English teacher in the Atfaluna School met with me to discuss her student’s development and said: “I have noticed a difference in the students’ performance in my class They are happier, healthier, calmer and doing well in class. There is a big difference from what they were like prior to the school lunch program. I am pleased to see this change in the children, they deserve it”.   Maha Al Mudalal Arabic Language teacher also told me how the students were prior to the lunch program and how things changed, “Students in my class are no longer complaining of hunger, I used to see them signing to each other saying they had nothing to eat last night. It was so upsetting to know hunger was all the children could think of in class. They are now able to put hunger aside and concentrate on their studies”   Your continued generosity will ensure vital support for these most vulnerable besieged children, some of when are orphaned, with vital school stationary, hearing equipment, transportation to school and vital nutrition. LiFT refugee care – internally displaced Iraqi families In Iraq, the cold season, when temperatures are close to zero during the night, lasts from January to March. Most of the IDP families fled from their home towns and villages during the summer, bringing only the most necessary items often fleeing with the clothes on their backs. They are in desperate need of heaters, blankets and warm clothing. Only an tiny minority of the IDRs heads of families work on a regular basis. Most families live in food insecurity, not knowing where their next meal will come from. They do not feel able to purchase heaters or warm clothing and many will fall ill and even die from the effects of hypothermia if not assisted. The Trust has distributed 500 kerosene heaters, 2,000 double blankets and over 1,800 pairs of warm clothing to families in five locations. In all we estimate that the generosity of our patrons will benefit more than 6,000 individuals in these challenging conditions. We thank you for your generous support throughout the year with your prayers, financial donations and contribution of time, energy and expertise to ensure the Trust is able to continue to support the needy families. We request your continued support through 2015 so we are together able to empower, educate, treat, feed, cloathe and shelter our fellow human beings. Several more projects can be found on the web-site. We value your feedback and look forward to working together to facilitate change in 2015 as we have together achieved over the past 17 years. Ms Khadija Gulamhussein, Public Relations volunteer   Gala Dinner 2014: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N-b4I-_7EzE&feature=youtu.be   Video Gallery: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/video-gallery Image gallery: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/lft-in-action/image-gallery Solar Cooker Training: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDG-ZV8xv4w   https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/lady-fatemah-charitable-trust/id598326331?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D4   twitter.com/#!/LFTrust    http://www.facebook.com/LadyFatemahTrust   We recently registered BT’s ‘My Donate’ where you can donate to the Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust   To support the LFT’s Appeal we have now set up a system of donating to your favourite charity via your mobile phone. To donate £1 text LFCT141 to 70070; To donate £2 text LFCT142 to 70070 To donate £3 text LFCT143 to 70070; To donate £4 text LFCT144 to 70070 To donate £5 text LFCT145 to 70070; To donate £10 text LFCT1410 to 70070 The Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust is one of the first charities to use its own unique text code, LFCT14, to raise funds by using JustTextGiving. In the spirit of the LFT, this is a new service which has no set up or associated costs for the LFT and every penny donated via text goes directly to the LFT. Once your donation has gone through, you can also add Gift Aid to the donation, which we recommend as it gives us an extra 25% on your donation. From today, LFT supporter can make donations of up to £10 by texting LFCT14 and either 1,2,3,4,5 or 10 to 70070. The text message is free and all funds will go to worthy causes. Ijaza:
  • ·  
Development and Relief Foundation and Islamic Humanitarian Service:
  • · The Trust has recently entered into an agreement with Development & Relief Foundation in the US, similar to IHS in Kitchener, Ontario,
  Give As You Earn:
  • This is the UK’s largest payroll giving scheme and is administered by CAF (Charities Aid Foundation). Any employee or pensioner paid under PAYE can donate to a charitable organization in the UK. The Trust has now been set up to receive GAYE donations, and our reference number is GYE 458449.  
To make a regular donation by standing order, please download a mandate from the website or contact us and we will send one to you. http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate . You can make a donation by using our secure on-line payment facility at https://secure.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate.php Please remember that completing a Gift Aid form substantially boosts your donation by 25% if you are a UK taxpayer. Yours sincerely,  Ms Ahlam M El Hattab, Trustee info@ladyfatemahtrust.org  http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/ 

Tel +44 (0) 1494 762 063, Email info@ladyfatemahtrust.org, Fax +44 (0) 1494 762 286, Mobile +44 (0) 7798 76 10 20 Website: http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org 

 

This Trust operates on ZERO admin cost since 1997 and helps thousands of impoverished people around the world through projects covering education, humanitarian relief, medical assistance, basic food, water provision, eye clinics and orphan care. This email and any files transmitted with it are intended solely for the use of the individual(s) or entity to whom they are addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, you should not copy it, use it or disclose its contents. Please notify info@ladyfatemahtrust.org immediately and destroy your copy. Internet communications including e-mails cannot be guaranteed to be secure or error free. While the LFT has taken steps to control the spread of viruses on its systems it cannot guarantee that this email (including any attachments) is free of any virus or other harmful matter and accepts no responsibility for any loss or damage resulting from the recipient receiving, opening or using it.
13th
Jan
2015

Newsletter January 2015 Rabi’ ul Awwal / Rabi’ ul Thani 1436 A.H.


Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem

­­­­­­­­­­Dear Patrons – Salaamun Alaikum

Education is a highly empowering tool and your support at the LFCT has meant that over the past 17 years the Trust has been able to reach out to empower students at various levels from supporting orphanages with poultry microfinance in Kibowa, Tanzania to the teacher development sessions in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. You have assisted orphans and refugees get educated from Iraq to Gaza where students with hearing disabilities put on a wide smile to say thank you. In total 62 students have graduated with your generous support in India, Pakistan, Lebanon and Palestine. In many instances these graduates return to their communities whilst studying to run tuition centres for other students from destitute backgrounds succeed in school. A total of 3 graduates from Bangalore’s slums have been mentored in work experience to be able to get good graduate placements. This sits at the core of the LFCT’s ethos of empowerment to self-sustaining families who have a future to look forward to that is brighter and more independent. Their prayers for you and gratitude for your selfless lifeline to them will never be forgotten.

jan1One such individual is Syed Afshar Husain Kazmi from Gigit Baltistan in Pakistan who the Trust has supported after he was turned down by several NGOs. His family sold land to support him and he ran into financial hardships soon after starting his course at Politecnico di Torino, Italy in Mechanical and Production engineering and a Masters degree in Engineering and Management. During his Bachelors degree, Afshar spent a year in China on a research project and he has returned there for further research to complete his PhD project. The completion of his doctoral thesis will be a rewarding moment for Afshar and his family, made possible by you, the family of LFCT patrons. He remains eternally grateful for support in his darkest moments and constant encouragement to complete his studies and achieve the highest grades.

LiFT Projects Ramadhan 1436 jan4jan2 jan3

Whilst the Holy Month of Ramadhan is over four months away, we would invite you to start pledging your donations towards this flagship project of the Trust. Every year, your generosity ensures the distribution of food parcels to needy families across Iraq, Syrian refugees in Lebanon, Pakistan, Palestine, Kenya and Tanzania so that they can at least enjoy one square meal a day after fasting. The logistics of getting food to their homes before the onset of the Holy Month means that food needs to be ordered this month and transported to distribution centres near their homes and given to them by the end of Shabaan. The process of vetting families for eligibility has begun and we would request you to continue donating generously as many times as you can in the lead up to the Holy Month so we can reach out to even more beneficiaries particularly orphans, widows and refugees. Food parcels comprise of the most nutritious compliment of the local diet and the distribution is monitored by local partners who are expected to submit detailed accounts of the distribution to maximise effectiveness.

LiFT Tanzania

jan5 jan6

The LFCT has initiated its first ten microfinance projects on Pemba Island, Tanzania. In the first case, for a cost of £80.00 it provided two goats to a family of ten, which is expected to transform their standard of living. At the moment, the family’s agricultural pursuits do not even cover a quarter of their food requirements, and the family is forced to live on one meal a day. The new microfinance project will allow the family to generate additional income, not only to feed themselves adequately, but to also allow their children to access education, thus improving their prospects for the future. The projects are on-going and your continued support will enable us to roll out further work.

LiFT Pakistan jan7 jan8

The LFT is continuing its appeal to provide goats to destitute widows in the Thar Desert in Pakistan. To date, the LFT has distributed 102 goats, and the appeal is to extend this figure to 122. Goats are easy to raise and maintain, and multiply rapidly. Every year, a goat will give birth to 2-3 offspring, which in turn will be ready to reproduce after three years. For this reason, they tend to be a profitable source of income. In addition to being able to sell the milk of goats for profit, widows can also sell a few of their stock, once the numbers reach a sustainable level. Whilst the conditions in the Thar Desert make it difficult to grow crops, the climate easily sustains grass and shrubs, which are an ideal food-source for goats. For this reason, the rearing of goats is one of the only feasible ways in which these women can generate income in order to live self-sustaining lives. The LFT strongly believes in empowering women to lead independent lives of dignity. Its microfinance projects are geared towards this end, and the LFCT humbly requests you to support it in its efforts.

LiFT Iraq

jan9 jan10

In 2006, the LFCT and its partner organization in Iraq joined hands to care for then eleven unaccompanied elderly and chronically ill Iraqi refugees living in the Sultaniyeh refugee camp. The Holy Prophet (pbuh) has said that “Those who do not show mercy to our young ones and do not realise the right of our elders are not from us” and it was in this spirit that the LFCT took on the care of these elderly refugees. At the end of 2013, only three of the eleven original beneficiaries were still alive. In January 2014, the LFCT’s partner received an appeal to take on the care of a further five beneficiaries. A visit to the camp by LFCT volunteers showed that the five potential new beneficiaries were living in abject poverty, as they were unable to work due to old age or chronic disease. From February 2014, the LFCT decided to take on the care of these five new beneficiaries, and also expanded the scope of their programme. The total cost of the project in 2014 came to just over £4,600, and LFCT would like to continue its work into 2015, with the seven remaining beneficiaries. Every human being has the right to live in old age with dignity and care, and the LFCT humbly requests you to support it in ensuring that this happens.

LiFT Medical Education Project, Lebanon

Furthering the Trust’s promotion of education in Lebanon, we provides bursaries for impoverished students in developing countries who wish to undertake medical education, including nursing, dentistry, general practice and other medical professions. Since its inception, the project has had multiple beneficiaries. Under its thirty-ninth appeal, the LFT would like to fund the education of eighteen year old Aya Ali Rida from South Lebanon. Her father’s modest income of US$ 800.00 per month is insufficient to support the basic needs of his four children, and Aya’s education. As a result, Aya has appealed to the LFCT to fund her nursing course for the next four years at a cost of just over $4,000. Her desire to study nursing will be intellectually empowering, will allow her to become financially independent, and will give her the means contribute positively to the society in which she lives. The LFT humbly requests that you help empower Aya, and give her hope for a better future.

 Ms Khadija Gulamhussein, Public Relations volunteer

7th
Mar
2015

Newsletter March 2015 Jumada Al Awwal / Jumada Al Thani 1436 A.H.


Dear Patrons – Salaamun Alaikum

10th Annual Gala Dinner

 

Gala Dinner will be held on 06th June 2015 at Thistle Hotel Heathrow. The Keynote speaker will be Dame Claire Bertschunger. Nurse and Humanitarian whose work during the famine in Ethiopia inspired Band Aid. Tickets are now on sale and can be purchased at https://www.tickettailor.com/checkout/view-event/id/24812/chk/f8e0/ref/website_widget

Ramadan 1436 A.H.

As Ramadan approaches, the LFCT would like to highlight the plight of the many Syrian refugees in Lebanon, displaced Iraqis within Iraq. Displaced by the ongoing, bloody conflict, over two million Syrians have taken refuge in Lebanon. They now make up nearly half of the population. They are living on the margins of society, in makeshift camps and abandoned buildings. Life continues in a state of limbo, where desperate adults cannot work and frustrated children await the promise of school. We must also remember that Lebanon itself is a country stretched for resources and now host to nearly two million Syrian refugees, the country enters into an uncertain future.

During the month of Ramadan, we will be appealing for funds to support the refugees, poor and aged with food to break their fasting. Your continued support is much appreciated.

LFCT in Tanzania

newsletter march 4newsletter march 3newsletter march 2

Clean, safe drinking water will be made available to over 1800 inhabitants of Jungani, Mtende and Jambang’one coastal villages on Pemba Island. After previous, unsuccessful attempts to provide safe water, the villagers are desperate for clean water within easy reach of their homes and livelihoods. Due to the proximity to the coast, during high tide, the sea water mixes with the fresh water in the wells, causing high levels of salinity in the well water which can have dangerous health impacts. Villagers are left with no alternative but to travel great distances, often by foot to collect water from alternative safe water sources, currently a long way from their homes. The use of this precious time for collecting water often falls upon women or children, reducing their ability to strengthen their livelihoods, care for the family and prepare for the future.

Piped water from the main island of Pemba has been made available for the three villages, however the connections remain far away, which means currently, water still has to be transported great distances by the villagers. The Lady Fatemah (as) Trust will assist them in bringing water from where the water work department has reached, to their villages.

Wello WaterWheels

newsletter march 6newsletter march 5

In addition, the LFCT are partnering up with Wello WaterWheels to provide 250 durable, readily transportable water containers to Pemba Island residents. The WaterWheels, are a convenient, highly mobile water transportation and storage unit that means water can easily be ‘wheeled’ from where it is collected in much higher quantities than can be carried by hand. The wheel holds up to 45 litres, the equivalent of what four women can carry on their person, traditionally, on their heads in jerry cans. Women spend 25% of their time on water collection each day walking for miles with burden of a water container which equals a standard airline checked bag. The WaterWheel is a low cost, culturally appropriate solution that the LFCT hopes the Trust’s supporters will rally behind.

LFCT in Pakistan

122 widows benefit from a highly successful microfinance project that has provided goats in Abbottabad, Haripur, Rawalpindi, Ghotki, Shikar Pur and Tharparkar Districts. Goats provide marginalised and destitute widows with improved financial, social and nutritional security. Goats quickly reproduce, giving birth to up to two young each year and readily survive in mountainous and desert areas. Women who previously had very little possessions including no land, an irregular income and access to only the most basic, subsistence food where it was not uncommon for their children to be malnourished, now live with much greater security and sustainability. The impact of this project runs even deeper, having a continued effect on children and the wider family as all become more self-sufficient. Many more widows continue to seek support under this highly successful and self-sustaining project. The LFCT plan to reach out to 10 additional widows at Rs.12.000.00 per goat for transportation and distribution. This is just GB£78.00 per goat.

Providing access to safe drinking water also remains a priority for the LFCT in Pakistan. This month the Trust is able to report supplying 10 more villages with safe drinking water since December 2014 through hand pumps. Rs. 95,635 (£634) is currently left over and will be utilised in forthcoming schemes in hard to reach and desert areas of Pakistan. The LFCT have committed to providing clean water to a further 10 villages between March and June 2015 through hand pumps and wells at a cost of £5,304 which includes the money saved from the previous 10 schemes.

Water services in Pakistan are at best intermittent, with poor drinking water quality and sanitation leading to major outbreaks of waterborne diseases across the country in 2006. Estimates suggest that each year more than 3 million Pakistanis become infected with waterborne diseases. The LFCT’s commitment to helping towards providing safe water in Pakistan will alleviate suffering and restore health and dignity to numerous villages across Pakistan. Please support generously.

LFCT support promising Veterinary Doctor

The LFCT, with the generous support of its donors aims to support promising student Yadullah Baqir with the final year of a five program of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) at The University of Agriculture, PeshawarThough from an impoverished background, Yadullah Baqir hopes to become a qualified practitioner of Veterinary Medicine and embark on a career where he will be able to take care of his financially challenged family. Yadullah Baqir’s family have struggled to support his studies as Yadullah has 4 siblings and survive on the wage of his retired father (pension approximately £50 per month).

Yadullah Baqir has scored a CGPA 3.23/4.00 in his first year of DVM, but because of his family’s financial situation, Yadullah Baqir faces the risk of discontinuing his education. The Trust appeals for donors continued support with this promising student which will cost £580.

LFCT support Iram Fatima

Sister Iram Fatima is attending the third semester of an Eight Semester program at Government College University, Faisalabad studying for a BS degree in Chemistry. From an impoverished background, Iram Fatima hopes to become a qualified graduate and embark on a career where she will be able to take care of her financially disadvantaged family. Iram Fatima’s family are supported by her father who is a shopkeeper, earing just £65 (approximately) each month. Iram Fatima has 3 siblings, making it difficult for her father, Muhammad Hussain to support her education. Fatima faces the risk of discontinuing her education unless she receives timely help. The LFCT is working with MICT to provide funding (£355) for Iram Fatima’s remaining five semesters. MICT under the direction of LFCT will closely monitor Iram Fatima’s progress.

The LFCT continues to support MICT to aid multiple students with their studies as education is vital for self- sufficiency.

Sister Syeda Bushra Parveen graduates

Many Thanks & Duas to the LFCT-UK to support my daughter for her educational dues” says the mother of Bushra Parveen

Sister Syeda Bushra Parveen graduates in BA Eastern medicine and Surgery (BEMS) after the support of the LFCT. Syeda Bushra Parveen’s father Syed Shafqat Hussain died of cardiac failure in 2005, leaving behind five children. Her late father was a low income shopkeeper and Bushra’s younger brother Syed Sajjad Haider had to discontinue his education after graduating from high school, in order to support his family. He is presently working as salesman in a cellular phone company on a monthly wage of approximately £98, with little hope of significantly improving his financial situation.

Bushra Parveen approached MICT for sponsorship for the remaining three years of her BEMS course. With the support of LFCT, MICT arranged an amount of £1634 to be transferred. Bushra Parveen was an intelligent and hardworking student. She has successfully completed her Bachelor of Eastern Medicine & Surgery BEMS with first division and is an example of the great success sponsorship of promising students can have. Bushra Parveen and her family conveyed their Duas and Thanks to all the Trustees of Lady Fatemah Trust-UK.

30th
Apr
2015

Newsletter April 2015 Jumada Al Thani / Rajab 1436 A.H.


Dear Patrons – Salaamun Alaikum

Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust Annual Gala

We would also like to take this opportunity to remind the Trusts valued supporters that the Annual Gala is fast approaching! The Gala takes place this year on Saturday 6th June at the Thistle Hotel London Heathrow. It is set to be the Trust’s main event of the year and a fantastic night of entertainment, inspiration, socialising and fundraising. The keynote speaker this year is Dame Claire Bertschinger; Nurse and humanitarian and Sadia Azmat, BBC Stand-up Comedian. Tickets cost £60 and all proceeds go to a LFCT project of your choice. Tickets can be purchased through the website, emailing tickets@ladyfatemahtrust.org or calling 07702794401. A night not to be missed!

Ramadan Eftar Appeal

This year the LFCT aim to provide basic food items for 2,614 Mo’min Refugee Families, approximately 13,070 persons. Ramadan is a very special time, however fasting in the holy month will be difficult this year as it is in summer and days will be long and hot. Proper nutrition is essential so that the fasting person has the necessary energy to fast through the day and still derive the spiritual benefit of additional prayers and reciting the Holy Quran. This fasting is made increasingly difficult to families living with food insecurity, as the beneficiaries of the joint Eftar Assistance Program of LFCT and its partner, who already work with these families, do. Assisting them with food relief during the holy month will enable them to derive the same spiritual benefit as economically secure families. With just GBP £31.80 you can provide basic, not perishable food items for a family of five and earn their heartfelt prayers. Please, paint a smile on the faces of the beneficiaries of the 2014 Eftar Assistance Program who hope for the same assistance in 2015. LFCT Will also provide Ramadhan Eftar Food Baskets to Widows and Poor families of Iraq and Pakistan

Yemen Emergency Appeal

This month we have several ongoing and emergency appeals, starting with the terrible plight that is being afflicted upon Yemen’s vulnerable and innocent civilians as they face civil war. Vital services and amenities have been severed and families begin to go hungry, without shelter and uncertain of what the next days might bring. Thousands have been injured, including many children and the death toll continues to rise. The psychological effects of the conflict are beginning to surface and it is vital that shelter, food, water and medical supplies reach the affected. The Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust is working directly with a local NGO on the ground to deliver aid. This means any donation you make to the Trust can have an immediate impact with no administrative cost. Please donate generously today to help alleviate the suffering.

Al Hujjah Hospital, Karbala Appeal

LFCT Donors Please donate generously towards Al Hujjah Hospital Karbala Karbala Hospital, a project of Development and Relief Foundation, which is a non-profit 501 (C) (3) organization whose mission is to bring healing and hope to broken hearts for a promising future by providing quality education to children, offering income-generating training for low income individuals, distributing nourishing food to underserved families, sponsoring orphans and less fortunate children, and building a hospital with comprehensive and compassionate care. Karbala Hospital is committed to improving the health and lives of the population the region.

In 2007, DRF started constructing an 8-story, 145-bed hospital in Karbala. The surgical theatre consists of seven operation rooms and pre and postoperative holding areas with a total area of 1600 square metres. There will be two specialized operation rooms in cardiology and orthopaedics, and three general ORs, in addition to one cardiac catheterization lab and one minor surgery room in the ER. Karbala Hospital will be able to medically serve a population of 3 million at an affordable cost and supply between 600 to 900 jobs.

Due to the lack of medical services related to the past international blockade under the former regime and the current perilous political and security conditions, the holy city of Karbala, in particular, has been deprived from an adequate number of health centres and hospitals. Currently, the healthcare state is suboptimal in the province of Karbala. The total number of hospital beds available in the province is 1,163 for a total population of 1.2 million, which puts the rate of bed/population in Karbala below 1%, smaller than 14 other provinces out of 18 total in Iraq.

Partnerships and Advisers Team Karbala’ is a medical advisory group of highly dedicated and renowned medical professionals who volunteer in assisting the project with their expertise. Their expert opinions provide valuable information on the functional capabilities, opportunities, threats and limitations of the future operation of the project. Karbala Hospital has several other partnerships with medical institutions and universities including Hardin Memorial Hospital, World Sight, and the Institute of International Health at Michigan State University, The Lady Fatemah (a.s.) Charitable Trust and Development and Relief Foundation.

A unique feature of Karbala Hospital is that it solely relies on contributions from generous philanthropists and good-hearted people and charitable believers worldwide to establish and expand the vital projects and programs that improve the quality of healthcare. Your gift is an investment in the future of quality healthcare in the province of Karbala and each gift is deeply appreciated regardless of its kind and amount, since it will certainly help the hospital’s physicians and medical staff to provide excellent services using advanced technology and treatment methods. Contributions from the US made through Development and Relief Foundation are tax deductible and can be made through DRF’s website. Donations can also be made through the LFCT website where the following levels of Sponsorship are available: Platinum-$10,000.00 Gold-$5,000.00 Silver-$1,000.00 Bronze-$500.00. For more information about Karbala Hospital, visit its website. http://karbalahospital.com

Provision of Clean and Sufficient Water for Deaf Children and Adults and their Families in the Gaza Strip Appeal

UN reports revealed that the Gaza strip faces a water crisis that will soon make it unliveable. Water for the 1.8 million people – half of them children and two-thirds refugees – who live in just 365 sq. km of land bordering the Mediterranean comes entirely from the shallow coastal aquifer shared between Gaza, Israel and Egypt, which is only partly replenished each year by rainfall. Decades of over pumping and heavy pollution from salts and waste water has left the aquifer highly degraded, contaminated and in danger of irreparable damage. The scale and severity of the water crisis facing the Gaza Strip are enormous, and with the absence of immediate action to resolve this urgent issue due on-going tightened siege imposed against the Gaza Strip and recent conflicts, the damage to the Gaza Strip natural resources will be irreversible.

Recently, ASDC, an NGO in Gaza, that serves more than 15,000 deaf and hearing impaired children, adults and their families annually, has encountered a challenge in securing healthy water for its beneficiaries, as the available water is heavily polluted and is not healthy for the human usage. ASDC is seeking urgent assistance from the Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust to support the installation of a deep water well pump in ASDC premises along with the installation of a medium scale water desalination plant that will guarantee the provision of sustainable, clean, and healthy water for the beneficiaries of ASDC and will protect them from any risks emerging from polluted water diseases that can be fatal. The trust will support the installation of clean water hardware totalling USD$10,500. This support will be of high value as it will save the lives of thousands of deaf children and adults, their families and outpatients.

Ongoing support for Iraq’s Orphans

The LFCT continues its long term support to Orphans in Iraq, where just GBP£30/USD$45 per month can pay for vital education, clothing, health and welfare. With all orphans of school eligible age, the funding is dependent upon them continuing to attend an educational institution. Their progress is followed closely and the impact this small monthly support makes is perfectly summed up by this Widow and her daughter when the daughter asked, “Why can’t I buy all the things I need for school? Is it because I don’t have a father, like the other children?” After receiving the sponsorship, her mother told her, “Allah has provided the means to purchase what you need through LFT.”

With 15 million children caught up in major conflicts, UNICEF declared 2014 a devastating year for children. It is with this sentiment that the LFCT will continue to support as many orphaned children as possible. Please donate generously to make this project an ongoing success. 154 Orphans and 63 extremely vulnerable families were sponsored in the fourth quarter of 2014. A Total of 2,613 Sponsorships Were Paid in 2014

Ophthalmic Care in Lebanon

This month the LFCT has begun supporting The Imam Sadr Foundation (ISF), a non-governmental organisation in Lebanon who will provide ophthalmic care management in Marjeyoun Region, Lebanon, to complement their existing health programme within the region.

With the aim of providing preventative and curative interventions for at risk populations, the project will provide care for 300 people over 600 visits. At risk populations include the chronically ill (i.e. Diabetics, on the increase in the region), people with eye difficulties or deficiencies, children in schools (as preventive detection) and Syrian refugees and other vulnerable populations. The Foundation began constructing and running health clinics in 1985 and each institution adopts a holistic approach (as defined by the WHO) in accordance with national strategies set by the Ministry of Health and in association with local and international partners, programme policies and health services. Dayr Syriane Primary Healthcare Centre, located in Dayr Syriane village (near Al-Taybeh village with estimated 16,000 inhabitants) in the district of Marjeyoun (South Lebanon), will now be able to offer ophthalmic care alongside its existing services. This centre offers various primary care services (an average of 12,000 per year delivered to 5,000 visitors) and programs such as; general and specialized consultations, essential drugs, children vaccination, pre- and antenatal care, reproductive health, elderly care, mental health, laboratory tests, and social animations amongst others. According to the assessment of needs of the population and client satisfaction survey’s claims and suggestions, the centre has set a strategic goal to expand its services to an “ophthalmic clinic” for the disadvantaged and vulnerable populations. The cost of providing this is just GBP£16,460/USD$25,000.

By the will of God, the dream of many people will begin inshallah to come true this year before the holy month of Ramadan, with the call for Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust Association to sustain the root seeds of this project so it can flourish from year to year and enable many people to keep the Amanah Allah gave to them: Sight.

LFCT building houses for Flood Victims

Recipients are Brother Ali Mohamed Matoo, father of two children and his aged parents and Victim Brother Mohammed Yousef Ganayee, father of two children whose aged parents are living with him.

Costing just over GBP£3,216/USD$4,770, each the houses will provide shelter and security once more to victims of a terrible natural disaster in which all their belongings were lost.

Cancer patient with three children supported by LFCT

Under the LFCT’s Patient Welfare Program for Poor and Needy (Helping People – Changing Lives)

Faitma aged 45 and mother of 3 children belongs to an impoverished family of District Hunza Nagar in Pakistan’s Northern Gilgit Baltistan Province. Recently, Fatima`s life turned for the worst when she came to Islamabad for a minor Gall bladder surgery. After surgery the biopsy report revealed that she is suffering from Gall Bladder cancer. Her elder son Ghulam Hussain rushed her to Shifa International Hospital in Islamabad for further examinations. The doctors recommended an immediate surgery to stop the cancer from spreading to other organs.  Her son, Ghulam Hussain who is a school teacher, is seeking help for immediate treatment of his mother. In view of his limited income, Ghulam Hussain has requested a sum of GBP£4,626/USD$6,869 as per the doctor’s prescription to afford the surgery.

LFCT is the first NGO to visit the people living in the Marsh Lands, Iraq

Mr. Karim recently visited Iraq to pursue relief activities undertaken by the LFCT and to visit the Marsh Lands area and their people in the Southern regions of Iraq. To date, the LFCT has successfully distributed devices that use solar energy to generate electricity for light and to charge mobile phones – a great need in this area.

Inhabitants of these areas depend on the marsh water to carry out their daily activities such as cooking, drinking and washing. This is of concern as the water obtained from marshes has high salinity and an abundance of dead fish and other aquatic animals. Dogs and buffalos swim and utilize these waters too for drinking and defecating. According to our knowledge, cancer is a common disease that spreads among the residents of these areas and neighbouring southern Iraqi cities. Mr. Karim commented that he will discuss with Trustees to embark an appeal to supply simple water purification equipment so that the people of Marshes may have access to safe, filtered water. However it is likely that the partnership to work with the people of the Marsh Lands will be longstanding as they are impoverished and face many other issues including food insecurity, a lack of electricity, high levels of illiteracy, out of school children and lack of access to basic healthcare services.

21 Villages supplied with clean water

9,378 inhabitants over 21 villages have benefited from the provision of safe water since 2013. The benefit this has bought is best summarised by the inhabitants themselves, ‘Having solved our water problem, we now have time to tend to our farms’, ‘We never thought we could one day all spend time at our farm, as one of us was always out getting water for home’ and ‘We can now think of what more we can grow, to increase our income, and therefore uplift out living standard. All because we now have running water at our door step’. The water project for the population of Pemba has been very well received by all, solving the water collection issues. Prior to the project villages had to travel, often by foot, up to 2km each time they needed to draw water. Now they can simply step out of their homes and turn a tap on. This has made an incremental difference to the lives of over 9,378 villagers.

1st
Jun
2015

Newsletter May 2015 Rajab / Shabaan 1436 A.H.


Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem

Dear Patrons – Salaamun Alaikum

Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust Annual Gala

  1. We would also like to take this opportunity to remind the Trusts valued supporters that the Annual Gala is fast approaching! The Gala takes place this year on Saturday 6th June at the Thistle Hotel London Heathrow. It is set to be the Trust’s main event of the year and a fantastic night of entertainment, inspiration, socialising and fundraising. The keynote speaker this year is Dame Claire Bertschinger; Nurse and humanitarian and Sadia Azmat, BBC Stand-up Comedian. Tickets cost £60 and all proceeds go to a LFCT project of your choice. Tickets can be purchased through the website, emailing tickets@ladyfatemahtrust.org or calling 07702794401. A night not to be missed!

APPEAL: Ramadan Eftar Appeal

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This year the LFCT aim to provide basic food items for 2,614 Mo’min Refugee Families, approximately 13,070 persons. Ramadan is a very special time, however fasting in the holy month will be difficult this year as it is in summer and days will be long and hot. Proper nutrition is essential so that the fasting person has the necessary energy to fast through the day and still derive the spiritual benefit of additional prayers and reciting the Holy Quran. This fasting is made increasingly difficult to families living with food insecurity, as the beneficiaries of the joint Eftar Assistance Program of LFCT and its partner, IRAC, who already work with these families, do. Assisting them with food relief during the holy month will enable them to derive the same spiritual benefit as economically secure families. With just GBP£31.80 you can provide basic, not perishable food items for a family of five and earn their heartfelt prayers. Please, paint a smile on the faces of the beneficiaries of the 2014 Eftar Assistance Program who hope for the same assistance in 2015.

APPEAL: Al Hujjah Hospital, Karbala Appeal

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LFCT Donors Please donate generously towards Al Hujjah Hospital Karbala Karbala Hospital, a project of Development and Relief Foundation, which is a non-profit 501 (C) (3) organization whose mission is to bring healing and hope to broken hearts for a promising future by providing quality education to children, offering income-generating training for low income individuals, distributing nourishing food to underserved families, sponsoring orphans and less fortunate children, and building a hospital with comprehensive and compassionate care. Karbala Hospital is committed to improving the health and lives of the population the region.

In 2007, DRF started constructing an 8-story, 145-bed hospital in Karbala. The surgical theatre consists of seven operation rooms and pre and postoperative holding areas with a total area of 1600 square metres. There will be two specialized operation rooms in cardiology and orthopaedics, and three general ORs, in addition to one cardiac catheterization lab and one minor surgery room in the ER. Karbala Hospital will be able to medically serve a population of 3 million at an affordable cost and supply between 600 to 900 jobs.

Due to the lack of medical services related to the past international blockade under the former regime and the current perilous political and security conditions, the holy city of Karbala, in particular, has been deprived from an adequate number of health centres and hospitals. Currently, the healthcare state is suboptimal in the province of Karbala. The total number of hospital beds available in the province is 1,163 for a total population of 1.2 million, which puts the rate of bed/population in Karbala below 1%, smaller than 14 other provinces out of 18 total in Iraq.

Partnerships and Advisers Team Karbala’ is a medical advisory group of highly dedicated and renowned medical professionals who volunteer in assisting the project with their expertise. Their expert opinions provide valuable information on the functional capabilities, opportunities, threats and limitations of the future operation of the project. Karbala Hospital has several other partnerships with medical institutions and universities including Hardin Memorial Hospital, World Sight, and the Institute of International Health at Michigan State University, The Lady Fatemah (a.s.) Charitable Trust and Development and Relief Foundation.

A unique feature of Karbala Hospital is that it solely relies on contributions from generous philanthropists and good-hearted people and charitable believers worldwide to establish and expand the vital projects and programs that improve the quality of healthcare. Your gift is an investment in the future of quality healthcare in the province of Karbala and each gift is deeply appreciated regardless of its kind and amount, since it will certainly help the hospital’s physicians and medical staff to provide excellent services using advanced technology and treatment methods. Contributions from the US made through Development and Relief Foundation are tax deductible and can be made through DRF’s website. Donations can also be made through the LFCT website where the following levels of Sponsorship are available: Platinum-$10,000.00 Gold-$5,000.00 Silver-$1,000.00 Bronze-$500.00. For more information about Karbala Hospital, visit its website. http://karbalahospital.com

APPEAL: Ongoing support for Iraq’s Orphans Appeal

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The LFCT continues its long term support to Orphans in Iraq, where just GBP£30/USD$45 per month can pay for vital education, clothing, health and welfare. With all orphans of school eligible age, the funding is dependent upon them continuing to attend an educational institution. Their progress is followed closely and the impact this small monthly support makes is perfectly summed up by this Widow and her daughter when the daughter asked, “Why can’t I buy all the things I need for school? Is it because I don’t have a father, like the other children?” After receiving the sponsorship, her mother told her, “Allah has provided the means to purchase what you need through LFT.”

With 15 million children caught up in major conflicts, UNICEF declared 2014 a devastating year for children. It is with this sentiment that the LFCT will continue to support as many orphaned children as possible. Please donate generously to make this project an ongoing success.

154 Orphans and 63 extremely vulnerable families were sponsored in the fourth quarter of 2014. A Total of 2,613 Sponsorships Were Paid in 2014.

Live Goats Project Pakistan

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During May, 10 more live goats are distributed to vulnerable widows in the Tharparkr region of Pakistan. The goats bring security and sustainability, rapidly reproducing and producing milk, hide and meat which can be used by the family or sold on for additional income. Goats are renowned for being easy to look after, able to survive with minimal food, on hardy shrubs in desert and hilly area. This project continues to be a success and the LFCT will assist more widows in the future.

Three more villages receive clean water in Pemba

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9,015 women, children and men can now benefit from clean, safe water directly to their villages on Pemba Island, through a piped water scheme and storage tank. This is a dream come true for the villagers who, prior to the LFCT’s assistance, had no choice but to travel great distances to fetch dirty, contaminated water. Although villagers had attempted to dig a well, the water table in Pemba has high levels of saline intrusion which can have a drastic effect on health and longevity with links to hypertension and putting pregnant women in great danger during their pregnancy. The Trust has assisted the three villages in brining clean water through a piped water supply and sanitary storage tank, restoring health, happiness and dignity and freeing time for villagers to work on sustaining the family, growing their income and focussing on supporting their children. The final touches and LFCT signboard has been completed, giving the each village 10,000 litres of clean water, a huge weight off their shoulders and freeing up invaluable time and resources.

We pray LFCT is given the strength to continue with this noble deed, and provide water to more villages, thus making life easier in these trying times.” Villager

11 More water wells are built in Pakistan

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Between March and May 2015, 11 more water wells have been built in Pakistan helping over 800 gain access to safe sources of clean water. 10 schemes were planned however LFCT’s partner in Pakistan, the Pravalli Welfare Trust was able to save Rs. 151,691.00 and install one additional water pump than planned. In Pakistan, only 92% of the population have access to clean water. A further 500,000 individuals need to gain access to water each year up to 2030 in order to reach 100% water access across Pakistan by 2030 – the sustainable development goals’ endpoint. By installing low cost, low technology solutions and working with a local partner, the LFCT is able to bring fresh, clean water to some of this vulnerable and marginalised community.

Food Baskets for 154 Orphaned and 104 very vulnerable refugee families

In the first quarter of 2015 the LFCT assisted the most vulnerable families with food baskets. The quarterly food distributions of LFCT’s partner are a lifeline for destitute refugee families. By receiving basic food items free of charge, they can use their limited cash to purchase vegetables and small amounts of meat or chicken, thus improving their nutrition. Many of these families are headed by women who eke out a living working in industrial sewing from their homes, so that they can gain an income and at the same time tend to their children. During each distribution they tell the Middle East partner how much they appreciate this assistance. “We cannot do anything for the kind donors but pray for them. They are in our prayers every night.” During this distribution, LFCT’s partner in the Middle East included hygienic items as well as sanitary napkins for ladies as it had become obvious that the refugees are unable to keep up proper hygiene due to the high cost of soap, shampoo and detergent. LFCT Donors Please donate generously. Let us bring smile on more Refugee Families. The average cost for a food basket per family is just £44.

A lifeline of support for Philippine families after Typhoon Haiyan

November 2013’s Cyclone Haiyan turned out to be the deadliest in Philippine history claiming 6,300 lives and making 11,000 homeless. It left utter devastation in its path, splitting apart families and communities, destroying schools and washing away livelihoods. The LFCT sent much needed aid to the victims of this powerful natural disaster. Here is one vivid account of their experiences and what the Trust’s assistance meant to them.

Eleanor: “We waited and waited for more news, a call from our love ones, a call from our family and friends. Come darkness and night, there was still no concrete news. We called around but nobody could give us news. We were in front of the television, hoping that the international and local news network would give us more information, or just a glimpse of what was really happening. As the mages of the devastation reached our screens, our hearts sunk as we saw shattered houses, dead bodies lying, no water, food or electricity. We still had no news from our family. My 5 year old daughter asked why I was crying and I told her, with the heaviest heart that her Grandfather, Aunt, Uncles, Cousins, other relatives and friends are missing. As the weekend came and went, we still had no news. News began to reach us telling us that all houses along the coast had perished; this was where my family were. As my brother and I prepared to drive to the Tacloban coast, the phone rang. I heard my sisters’ voice, trembling and crying ‘Daddy is alive and ok, we cannot find Mano Eddie (our eldest brother), we no longer have a house to go home to. Help us, there is no medicine, the food and water for Dad is about to run out’. On Monday we finally reached Tacloban. Although I had some idea of how the city was, I still wasn’t prepared – dead bodies next to a child, a mother and father staring into an empty space, still in a state of shock whilst others searched the debris. Houses were flattened and completely destroyed totally with people making temporary shelters out of whatever they could find. We continued to search for our brother but our father was ill and so we had to leave the city to get him correct medical care. Leaving the city, it was so hard to tell him the lovely house he had built with our mother, the home to his eight children, was gone. On top of this, his eldest son was missing. Our father moved temporarily to Manila, and survived the typhoon, but wasn’t free from intermittent pneumonia. He was in and out of hospital every month. Eventually he needed a gastrostomy as he wasn’t tolerating food orally.  He survived Haiyan, but the emotional and physical stress made him weak. Sadly, my father joined The Lord last May without seeing his family house rebuilt and knowing he lost his son. On behalf of my family, we are so grateful for the financial gift the LFCTs sent us. We may not have been able to rebuild the house, but it helped us during the toughest 6 months of our lives, in and out of hospital, relocation, and buying expensive medicines and doctors’ fees. For this, we thank you.

Microfinance support in Delhi

This month the Trust has provided micro-finance to a promising young orphan in Delhi in order to help him set up his own Tutorial Centre. Shanjah Imam resides in Bihar region, India. His father passed away 3 years ago and since then Shanjah has taken a leading role in supporting his mother, siblings and cousin. Shanjah has a promising life ahead of him but needs some immediate financial to support him in setting up his future. This positive start would not have been possible without the assistance of the Trust. 2-3 students have already joined classes at the Centre and the orphan is enjoying his independence and ability to make a sustainable and dignified livelihood. He is truly thankful to the Trust for this life changing opportunity.

Great benefits at Bagamoyo Hospital, Dar es Salam after much needed refurbishment

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The refurbishing of what was a very dilapidated evacuation (minor theatre) room in the gynaecological ward of Bagamoyo district hospital has supremely lifted the morale of the ward staff. After refurbishment, the room became operational in November 2014. Thanks to the LFCT for making all these possible.

The room was initially in a very poor state: worn out cement flooring, dark and dirty walls, poor lighting, wooden, termite eaten windows and doors, and damaged wash basin, on top of the absence of running water. The lack of water meant that most of the minor operations could not be performed and had to be rescheduled to the only other theatre in the hospital, lengthening the waiting list. In addition, the toilets and washrooms at the hospital were in a very bad state, including broken pipes, damaged and stained ceramic tiles, all compounded by the lack of regular running water supply.

The evacuation room now boasts a brand new tiled floor and walls, new ceiling with fan, an aluminium glass door and aluminium glazed window. The theatre is also equipped with a new wash basin with running tap water, serviced by two 2000 litre capacity water tanks just outside the room (larger than the capacity supplying the main operating theatre). The toilets are now cleaner and tolerable for the patients and the cleaning staff. In actual fact, the refurbished ward has now become the supplier of water to the other wards when water shortages develop across the hospital which is a common occurrence. Thanks to the LFCT for making all these possible.

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Jul
2015

Newsletter June 2015 Shabaan / Ramadhan1436 A.H.


Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem

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Dear Supporters – Salaamun Alaikum RAMADHAN KAREEM

APPEAL: Ramadan food for over 15,000 needy families in Kenya, Gaza, Lebanon, Tanzania, West Bank, Iraq, Pakistan and Ethiopia

LFCT donors, please donate generously, together we can make a difference.

As Ramadan 2015 begins, the Holiest month in the Islamic calendar, poor families across the world face breaking their fast with no nourishment. This Ramadan, fasting will reach up to 19 hours in the UK, but each day there will be a break to our fasting with a meal. For some, food to break the fast is scarce. Just one case in Kenya brings this plight to life, as 404 families in Chengoni, Kenya, are in great assistance of food baskets this Ramadan, to enable them break their fast each day with a nourishing meal. Please help to provide to them as you do your own family this Ramadan.

 

LFT’s local partner in Kenya work directly with poor families through centres embedded in local communities. It is through these centres that 404 families, who are predominantly subsistence farmers, have been identified as being in the greatest need of assistance this Ramadan to help them break their fast with dignity. They have increasingly precarious livelihoods, on a knife-edge from by the risk of drought due to inconsistent rainfall, disease and soil degradation which can cause famine and undernourishment in this already poor community. There are thousands of families just like this across the world that are in great need of your help this Ramadan.

Will you reach out? It costs just £5 to feed an individual for the month, £40 for a family and £10,000 to feed a whole village. Together we have the power to make a difference.

APPEAL: LFCT in Pakistan – Shining the Light for a better tomorrow

Workshop for preparation of College Entrance Examination for Higher School Graduates

 

Madinatul Ilm Charitable Trust in partnership with The Lady Fatemah (a.s) Charitable Trust is seeking to raise funds to support up to twenty-four bright young students who belong to the Baltistan region of Pakistan’s northern Gilgit-Baltistan province. Each of these students have completed their college education with most of them having attained grades between 70 to 85 percent. Coming from a largely underdeveloped region, these students offer the promise of entering professional colleges to attain higher education and eventually become top rate professionals in life.

 

With LFT’s support MICT feels that a strong effort to allow these students to prepare for their college entrance tests for next year will be a timely intervention in supporting the needs of these individuals who all come from low income households. Just £436.25 per student, a total of £10,470.00 will finance these students through a three month summer camp in Islamabad. In the past, thirty-two students who entered a similar summer camp have qualified to enter well reputed professional Institutions in Medical and Engineering institutions of Pakistan.This was made possible through the generous support of The Lady Fatemah (A.S) Charitable Trust channeled through MICT.

 

Please donate generously towards these students to make their future brighter.

 

APPEAL: Al Hujjah Hospital, Karbala Appeal

LFCT donors, please donate generously towards Al Hujjah Hospital Karbala Karbala Hospital, a project of Development and Relief Foundation, which is a non-profit 501 (C) (3) organization whose mission is to bring healing and hope to broken hearts for a promising future by providing quality education to children, offering income-generating training for low income individuals, distributing nourishing food to underserved families, sponsoring orphans and less fortunate children, and building a hospital with comprehensive and compassionate care. Karbala Hospital is committed to improving the health and lives of the population the region.

In 2007, DRF started constructing an 8-story, 145-bed hospital in Karbala. The surgical theatre consists of seven operation rooms and pre and postoperative holding areas with a total area of 1600 square metres. There will be two specialized operation rooms in cardiology and orthopaedics, and three general ORs, in addition to one cardiac catheterization lab and one minor surgery room in the ER. Karbala Hospital will be able to medically serve a population of 3 million at an affordable cost and supply between 600 to 900 jobs.

 

Due to the lack of medical services related to the past international blockade under the former regime and the current perilous political and security conditions, the holy city of Karbala, in particular, has been deprived from an adequate number of health centres and hospitals. Currently, the healthcare state is suboptimal in the province of Karbala. The total number of hospital beds available in the province is 1,163 for a total population of 1.2 million, which puts the rate of bed/population in Karbala below 1%, smaller than 14 other provinces out of 18 total in Iraq.

 

Partnerships and Advisers Team Karbala’ is a medical advisory group of highly dedicated and renowned medical professionals who volunteer in assisting the project with their expertise. Their expert opinions provide valuable information on the functional capabilities, opportunities, threats and limitations of the future operation of the project. Karbala Hospital has several other partnerships with medical institutions and universities including Hardin Memorial Hospital, World Sight, and the Institute of International Health at Michigan State University, The Lady Fatemah (a.s.) Charitable Trust and Development and Relief Foundation.

 

A unique feature of Karbala Hospital is that it solely relies on contributions from generous philanthropists and good-hearted people and charitable believers worldwide to establish and expand the vital projects and programs that improve the quality of healthcare. Your gift is an investment in the future of quality healthcare in the province of Karbala and each gift is deeply appreciated regardless of its kind and amount, since it will certainly help the hospital’s physicians and medical staff to provide excellent services using advanced technology and treatment methods. Contributions from the US made through Development and Relief Foundation are tax deductible and can be made through DRF’s website. Donations can also be made through the LFCT website where the following levels of Sponsorship are available: Platinum-$10,000.00 Gold-$5,000.00 Silver-$1,000.00 Bronze-$500.00. For more information about Karbala Hospital, visit its website. http://karbalahospital.com

 

APPEAL: Ongoing support for Iraq’s Orphans Appeal

His pillow is hard but his heart is soft.

“And they feed, for the love of Allah, the indigent, the orphan, and the captive” Chapter 76:8 Revealed in the honour of Sayyidah Fatemah a.s. and her family

To you the helpless can entrust their cause; you are the defender of orphans.” – Psalm 10:14

 

The LFCT continues its long term support to Orphans in Iraq, where just GBP£30/USD$45 per month can pay for vital education, clothing, health and welfare. With all orphans of school eligible age, the funding is dependent upon them continuing to attend an educational institution. Their progress is followed closely and the impact this small monthly support makes is perfectly summed up by this Widow and her daughter when the daughter asked, “Why can’t I buy all the things I need for school? Is it because I don’t have a father, like the other children?” After receiving the sponsorship, her mother told her, “Allah has provided the means to purchase what you need through LFT.”

 

Never in recent memory have so many children been subjected to such unspeakable brutality (Unicef, 2014). With 15 million children caught up in major conflicts, UNICEF declared 2014 a devastating year for children. It is with this sentiment that the LFCT will continue to support as many orphaned children as possible. Please donate generously to make this project an ongoing success. 154 Orphans and 63 extremely vulnerable families were sponsored in the fourth quarter of 2014. A Total of 2,613 Sponsorships Were Paid in 2014.

 

Your generous donations will help provide Iraqi orphans with nutrition, shelter, clothing, sanitation, medical care and education, all basic rights, within a home. Just £30.00 per month will provide an orphan child with shelter, food, water and cloth

 

Another fantastic Annual Gala – thanks to LFCT’s generous supporters and dedicated volunteers

The LFCT’s Annual Gala Night 2015 was a huge success – a night of inspiration and time to reflect back and look forward to yet another fantastic year for the LFCT, supporting more vulnerable and needy communities around the world.

 

The night saw Dame Claire Bertschinger and Sadia Azmat take to the stage providing fascinating stories and great entertainment. A huge thank you to all those that were involved with the Gala this year – the volunteers and organisers, presenters, guests and donors. It is not too late to make a donation in recognition of the Annual Gala. If you didn’t get chance to attend this year you can make a donation to a project of your choice at any time through the Trust’s website.

 

LIFESAVER Systems

Many of the LFCT supporters that attended the Gala this year would have been lucky enough to experience and see LIFESAVER Systems products in action, filtering dirty, contaminated water into clean, fresh water, right in front of our eyes! Shortly after the gala the LFCT visited LIFESAVERS offices and production facility, learning much more about the company and the product and learning about other NGO’s experiences in the field. LFCT and LIFESAVER are very excited to be working together and are looking forward to starting their first project together in the Marshlands area of Iraq in the next few months. More news to follow on this.

Ophthalmology Department, Karbala – Transforming darkness into light

This year, the LFCT has committed to transforming the lives of thousands in Karbala. A person forced to imagine the beauty of nature; a parent that can’t watch their child blossom into adulthood; a child that cannot see the comfort of a mothers embrace – these are all unfortunate realities of many people living in the Middle East. Unlike many other epidemics such as cancer or HIV/AIDS, where the cure is difficult to discover, over 80% of blindness is preventable. This equates to a staggering 800 million people that suffer unnecessarily. As we know that the eyesight of an individual naturally deteriorates with age; this proves to be the least of problems in the Middle East when acknowledging studies similar to one done in Lebanon where 231 children were studied in three blind schools in the age range of 6-20 years of age. Of these students, 70 % were blind before the age of two, meaning that the quality of life is not entirely enjoyed and many young children are forced to live a life of additional hardships. A more recent study revealed that out of 137 blind Jordanian children, 122 cases (77.7%) were found after 1970 some in which could have been treated with ease given the resources the developed countries have today. The time and date of these statistics mean that the problem is not getting better it is in fact taking a change for the worse.

 

The feasibility of curing blindness in middle eastern countries may appear to be a daunting task but at closer inspection one will realize that cataracts contributes up to 6.4% of health conditions in the middle east which contributes to nearly 7 million individuals that  must live with blindness  for the rest of their lives. Due to the recent surge in blindness in the Middle East from 1970 to present day, the gross domestic product has dwindled as blindness has an indirect relationship with the financial stability of that country. When a person is struck with a debilitating disease that results in blindness in the Middle East, that person then loses his/her opportunity to support their family. A domino effect then begins to play out as that person is forced into poverty and thus cannot contribute to the economy through buying and selling goods as he/she could’ve prior to the disease. The majority of people living with blindness are women, most blind people need someone to care for them, and this is usually a child, more often than not a little girl, and that child often misses out on the chance of an education because of their responsibilities. A further 190.6 million people were visually impaired to the point that their ability to function, to participate, to learn and to work is negatively impacted.

 

The burden that many Middle Eastern people bare is one that could be fixed in less than 20-30 minutes if supplied ample recourses to deliver the surgery which is still much cheaper in cost when compared to other major surgeries. The LFCT is supporting the Ophthalmology Department in Karbala by proving the full equipment to work with 20,000 patients per year. Karbala Hospital will be able to medically serve a population of 3 million at an affordable cost and supply between 600 to 900 jobs. It will serve people around Karbala and the South including Basra. We can help turn a new page for those suffering with preventable and curable blindness and turn these nightmares into things of the past. LFCT supporters, please donate generously. Dear donors donate generously and FLOOD light into the lives of the masses living in darkness unnecessarily….

 

LFCT in Palestine – Project completion with the Atfaluna Society for Deaf Children

Improving the livelihood condition of Sister Yosra Abu Quta and her Family, Gaza, Palestine. 

 

Yosra Abo Qota, is a thirty-eight-year-old mother with eight children, six boys and two daughters. The family lives in Deir Al Balah city, in the middle area of the Gaza Strip. Six of Yosra’s children suffer from Thalassemia and her husband has cartilage problems and mental disorders. She has great difficulty caring for all of her children and husband alongside managing a crumbling house with no window and a damaged ceiling.

 

In December 2013, ASDC’s team carried out several home visits to assess the needs of sister Yosra’s family. The main needs were identified and included: carrying out repairs for the house, financial assistance for the family for medications, and financial support for launching a micro-finance project.

Directly, upon receiving the fund, ASDC team started working with Sister Yosra on having the house repaired:

– Fitting of windows

– Plaster works to fix the ceiling and the gaps in the walls

– Electricity works and maintenance

 

After the completion of all repairs, the family was very excited to see their house in a new and healthy condition. The children expressed their happiness and comfort that they will no longer be afraid from winter as they have windows to protect them. Sister Yosra received financial assistance to pay for the medications and treatment fees needed for her children and husband. This support has eased her worries, as for her seeing her children in good health is the most important thing in life. All of this was possible through the generous support of the Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust.

 

The second step for the support was launching a small business for sister Yosra in order to have an income so she can provide for her children’s needs – a small business in her home, selling cosmetics and children’s clothing. Her business is successful, and she is now paying every effort to make a progress, in order to be able to support the needs of her family. The whole family is now in a stable condition, their sense of fear and discomfort has disappeared. She can now provide her family with needed medications, can secure healthy food for them, and can afford the fees for their education through having a sustainable source of income.

 

LCFT in Pakistan – 10 more villages receive water at their doorsteps in time for Ramadhan  

The total number of water projects now supported by the LFCT has reached 236 across the world.

The Tharparkar region in Pakistan has seen the successful installation of another 10 Water Wells in the form of hand pumps. These pumps will service the poor and needy communities whom before were forced to drink dirty and saline water which they often had to travel distances of up to 1.5kms to collect. All 10 were installed in June 2015 in the following villages Doonjh, Soojavery, Manjthi, Sirnghwaro, Lonai, Sonsan, Godhio, with several villages having multiple pumps if they are sizeable. The total cost for the scheme was £4,439.00.

 

Earlier in the month, two more hand pumps were installed, one in Mohalla School, Sataura Village and one in Maira Gujarat. In both cases, the bore was made by the villages. A prime example of the LFCT enabling people to help themselves. Together the total cost was £645.00. Many more villages are waiting for your generous donation.

LFCT Assists Blood Cancer Patient

LFCT assists Sister Farzana with a stem cell transplant as vital, lifesaving treatment in her battle against blood cancer. She is now recovering in hospital until the end of June. The LFCT have assisted Sister Farzana with the cost, approximately £4,498/UD$7,075. Asking the LFCT for financial assistance has been the family’s last option.

28th
Jul
2015

Newsletter July 2015 Ramadhan / Shawaal 1436 A.H.


Dear Supporters – Salaamun Alaikum EID MOUBARAK

APPEAL: LIFESAVER No person should be forced to drink dirty water – Help provide 5 million litres of safe water with a LIFESAVER C2 straight from the River Euphrates

1.1 billion people are living in water poverty as you read this today (WHO). You can help by donating to this vital appeal and provide the elixir of life – clean water.

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In Iraq, only 86.3% of the population have access to safe, clean water (WASHWatch, 2015). The LFCT want to increase this by working with a local partner to spread water, sanitation and hygiene education and install a LIFESAVER C2 system to provide needy communities with safe water at the turn of a tap. This will save lives and restore health, allow children to attend school free from sickness and families to maximize their productive time tending to their livelihoods. The LFCT has identified a site, on the River Euphrates, close to the Holy Shrines of Imam Hussein a.a. and his brother Hadhrat Abbas a.s. With your help, this significant river restore health and provide safe water to nearby communities and passers-by for up to 18 years.

Developed in 2012, the C2 is a 750 litre water container and filtration system that will take water straight from the River Euphrates and filter it at a rate of 12 litres per minute at the turn of a tap. Nearby communities can utilize this intuitive technology that takes just one hour to install in the knowledge that they have perfectly safe drinking water at their fingertips.

Please help the LFCT to provide a LIFESAVER C2 which will provide 5 million litres of water straight from the River Euphrates. Support this appeal today and each time you turn on the tap, boil the kettle or wash your clothes, think of those you have also helped to gain access to safe, clean water in Iraq at this significant site.

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APPEAL: Ongoing support for Iraq’s Orphans Appeal

His pillow is hard but his heart is soft.

To you the helpless can entrust their cause; you are the defender of orphans.” – Psalm 10:14

The LFCT continues its long term support to Orphans in Iraq, where just GBP£30/USD$45 per month can pay for vital education, clothing, health and welfare. With all orphans of school eligible age, the funding is dependent upon them continuing to attend an educational institution. Their progress is followed closely and the impact this small monthly support makes is perfectly summed up by this Widow and her daughter when the daughter asked, “Why can’t I buy all the things I need for school? Is it because I don’t have a father, like the other children?” After receiving the sponsorship, her mother told her, “Allah has provided the means to purchase what you need through LFT.”

Never in recent memory have so many children been subjected to such unspeakable brutality (Unicef, 2014). With 15 million children caught up in major conflicts, UNICEF declared 2014 a devastating year for children. It is with this sentiment that the LFCT will continue to support as many orphaned children as possible. Please donate generously to make this project an ongoing success. 154 Orphans and 63 extremely vulnerable families were sponsored in the fourth quarter of 2014. A Total of 2,613 Sponsorships Were Paid in 2014.

Your generous donations will help provide Iraqi orphans with nutrition, shelter, clothing, sanitation, medical care and education, all basic rights, within a home. Just £30.00 per month will provide an orphan child with shelter, food, water and cloth.

APPEAL: Ophthalmology Department, Karbala – Transforming darkness into light

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This year, the LFCT has committed to transforming the lives of thousands in Karbala. A person forced to imagine the beauty of nature; a parent that can’t watch their child blossom into adulthood; a child that cannot see the comfort of a mothers embrace – these are all unfortunate realities of many people living in the Middle East. Unlike many other epidemics such as cancer or HIV/AIDS, where the cure is difficult to discover, over 80% of blindness is preventable. This equates to a staggering 800 million people that suffer unnecessarily. As we know that the eyesight of an individual naturally deteriorates with age; this proves to be the least of problems in the Middle East when acknowledging studies similar to one done in Lebanon where 231 children were studied in three blind schools in the age range of 6-20 years of age. Of these students, 70 % were blind before the age of two, meaning that the quality of life is not entirely enjoyed and many young children are forced to live a life of additional hardships. A more recent study revealed that out of 137 blind Jordanian children, 122 cases (77.7%) were found after 1970 some in which could have been treated with ease given the resources the developed countries have today. The time and date of these statistics mean that the problem is not getting better it is in fact taking a change for the worse.

The feasibility of curing blindness in middle eastern countries may appear to be a daunting task but at closer inspection one will realize that cataracts contributes up to 6.4% of health conditions in the middle east which contributes to nearly 7 million individuals that  must live with blindness  for the rest of their lives. Due to the recent surge in blindness in the Middle East from 1970 to present day, the gross domestic product has dwindled as blindness has an indirect relationship with the financial stability of that country. When a person is struck with a debilitating disease that results in blindness in the Middle East, that person then loses his/her opportunity to support their family. A domino effect then begins to play out as that person is forced into poverty and thus cannot contribute to the economy through buying and selling goods as he/she could’ve prior to the disease. The majority of people living with blindness are women, most blind people need someone to care for them, and this is usually a child, more often than not a little girl, and that child often misses out on the chance of an education because of their responsibilities. A further 190.6 million people were visually impaired to the point that their ability to function, to participate, to learn and to work is negatively impacted.

The burden that many Middle Eastern people bare is one that could be fixed in less than 20-30 minutes if supplied ample recourses to deliver the surgery which is still much cheaper in cost when compared to other major surgeries. The LFCT is supporting the Ophthalmology Department in Karbala by proving the full equipment to work with 20,000 patients per year. Karbala Hospital will be able to medically serve a population of 3 million at an affordable cost and supply between 600 to 900 jobs. It will serve people around Karbala and the South including Basra. We can help turn a new page for those suffering with preventable and curable blindness and turn these nightmares into things of the past. LFCT supporters, please donate generously. Dear donors donate generously and FLOOD light into the lives of the masses living in darkness unnecessarily….

Early Intervention Programme for deaf children in the Gaza Strip

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An early intervention programme is a dire need to deaf and hearing impaired children to ensure that they acquire language and achieve age-appropriate communicative, cognitive, academic, social, and emotional development. The programme empowers the parents to take positive actions on behalf of and with their deaf children and reduces the heavy social and economic burden of hearing disability on individuals, families, and the community. The programme targeted a total of 77 (planned: 70) deaf and hearing impaired children. The program supported the deaf children and their families by providing them with the much needed early intervention services that includes: home-based educational sessions (220 total sessions carried out), mother-child sessions (total 915 carried out) and speech therapy sessions and social work services including home visits and family counselling.

The programme activities resulted in improving the speech, language and cognitive skills of the deaf children. They now know how to sign their needs to their mothers and can play and communicate with their siblings at home. The children are becoming more balanced, confident, brave, initiative and are clearly more involved in their family circle. Also, the activities are helping the deaf children and their families to overcome their psycho-social problems specially those raised after the last war on Gaza (July-August, 2014).

Before attending the early intervention sessions at Atfaluna, I faced many difficulties in dealing with Kamel. He was hyper-active and stubborn, but now Kamel’s behaviour changed a lot. He has learnt many things and he is becoming more balanced. Now I can easily communicate with my deaf son.” Kamel El Asha’l’s mother.

Provision of clean and sufficient water for deaf children and adults; their families and general public in the Gaza Strip

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The Gaza Strip continues to face dire situations due to the political turmoil and the ongoing siege that has been imposed for more than 8 years. According to the Palestinian Water Authority, 95% of the Gaza Strip water is contaminated which poses significant health risks to the 1.8 million residents living in the area. Families of deaf children enrolled in ASDC’s programs are always assured that their children are in a safe and healthy environment. Therefore, it is of importance to have clean and healthy water in ASDC’s premises available for ASDC’s beneficiaries and the public. Accordingly, ASDC sought urgent assistance from the Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust to support the installation of a deep water well pump in ASDC along with the installation of a medium scale water desalination plant that will guarantee the provision of sustainable, clean, and healthy water for the beneficiaries and the public. ASDC started the required procedures and started the installation works on the 8th July 2015. Works included drilling in the ground, installing pumps and finalizing all plumbing and extension works. The installation works were finalized on 22nd July 2015. The water well depth is 66 sq m. As the well installation works were finalized, the next step will be the installation of the water desalination plant that will be responsible for producing fresh water suitable for human consumption. The works for the desalination plant are expected to be finalized by 30th July 2015.

A father of a deaf child expressed: “The water in Gaza is not clean, and we always face problems in securing healthy water. However, having clean water through this well, for sure, will be of great benefit to our children and families benefitting from ASDC’s services. I am relieved and assured that my child is in a safe environment.”

Unemployment Microfinance for Goats Project in the Thar Desert region of Pakistan The LFCT and their local partner in Pakistan are working on an innovative pilot scheme project to bring individuals out of unemployment and help to sustain their families with the help of some goats.

In this pilot scheme, 4 goats have been given to two individuals, Imitaz and Devji, both of whom are unemployed but have families to look after who depend on them. Imitaz and Devji have been identified as particularly needy individuals by the staff and volunteers who know all of the communities they work with very well. One male goat will be bought to help all 8 female goats to breed. The Brothers will become shepherds, rear the goats and see the goats through rearing up their young. These 4 female goats will always remain with the shepherds. A goat will produce up to 2/3 kids per litter each year. In a goats lifetime it can produce up to between 8 – 10 times. These goat kids will be brought up and after two years, the male goats from the litters will be sold on and any female goats from the litter will remain with the shepherds for future breeding. Any proceeds from this sale will shared equally between the villagers, meaning they too can benefit. This is a very exciting project and the LFCT hope to learn from how it works in order to replicate it in the future.

LFCT APP ready on Google Play Store and Apple App store

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. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.ladyfatemah

The LFCT is delighted to announce that it has developed an App for iPhones and Android devices. The Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust App provides users with all the information they need to stay up to date with the latest appeals and information about the Trust and its projects. The App allows users to donate directly to the Trust’s very latest work and make a difference to the lives of the neediest across the world. Please follow the links below to download the App and stay up to date with the latest developments, appeals and projects.

Food Supply for Deprived Areas of District Rawalpindi – IFTAAR Program to Serve Needy People – Host The Allah’s Guests

The Lady Fatemah (a.s.) Charitable Trust (LFCT) UK and Madinatul Ilm Charitable Trust (MICT) Pakistan has successfully distributed Ramadan food support packs among 200 families from low income neighborhoods of Rawalpindi city.

This program has been an on-going project for many years. The food packs were delivered to 200 families comprising of just over 1500 individuals. The recipients of these packages include the elderly, widows, orphans, single mothers as well as other helpless and poverty stricken individuals. The packages included rice, flour, sugar, cooking oil and lentils among the basic ingredients. Each food package cost PKR 3,600.00/£22.79/$USD35.35.

Ramadan Iftar for 500 Needy Palestinian Refugee Families in the West Bank

4000 handicapped, unemployed, aged, widowed and orphaned individuals across 500 families received Ramadan Iftar between the 25th June and 5th July 2015.

One million refugees in Gaza – 70% of the population – is characterized by chronic unemployment, inadequate and unreliable access to electricity and water, health hazards from a highly inadequate sewage system, and sub-standard housing with thousands living in tents or the rubble of their former homes, dispossessed of all earthly belongings. Many refugees are facing the very real possibility of enduring the harsh summer, without the financial means to buy Ramadan basic needs – vegetables and fresh water. As a result of the blockade, refugees are increasingly reliant upon the assistance provided charity organizations.

The Humanitarian Relief Society has partnered with the LFCT to successfully deliver vital Ramadan Iftar parcels across the West Bank this Ramadan. Each basket contained Corn oil, rice, sugar, tea, semolina and dates. The food package for each family included; 3 kilos of corn oil, 5 kilos of rice, 4 kilos of sugar, 5 kilos of semolina, 1 kilo of dates, and 1 kilo of tea. The total cost for this project was £11,521.39.

Chronic Drugs Program at Imam Sadr Foundation, Funded by The LADY FATEMAH (a.s.) Charitable Trust 

Imam Sadr Foundation (ISF) is a Community Based Organization, with its headquarters based in Tyre (South-Lebanon), striving towards a modern society that embraces social justice and combats illiteracy, poverty, illness and violence. 

The ISF Health Department which monitors seven Primary Health Care Centres, two Mobile Clinics and one School Dispensary, is offering preventive and curative care to people in need from all ages, regardless of their belief or political affiliations. Respecting their human dignity and the principle of Equity in Health, ISF Health Department insures these people with quality primary health care services, such as specialized medical consultations, nursing care, Mental Health support, dental care, physiotherapy, laboratory tests, health education, psycho-social animations and medicines from the Essential Drugs Program. Regarding that a lot of efficient medicines cannot be afforded by the patients, especially those who are not covered by the National Security, Lady Fatemah Charity Trust (LFCT) association is playing a major role in saving lives of the Poor, through its sustainable support in medicines prescribed to ISF patients.

A bright future: Be a part of helping to LiFT a widow out of poverty today

The LFCT dreams of helping Sister Hiam to support her two young daughters with the construction of a modest room to conduct her stitching business from. Be a part of this amazing, self-sustaining project and donate today.

Sister Hiam Shamas Izzedine was widowed in 2006. Living in Nabatieh District South Lebanon, Sister was already impoverished, her husband’s informal source of income as a daily worker prior to his death meant he had no fixed income and his wife was left with no compensation after his death. After his passing away, Sister Hiam was left to look after their two daughters, then aged just 5 and 1. Sister does not work and they were left struggling to source their every meal.

This was no way for anyone to exist, especially a vulnerable widowed mother with two young children.

This family was involved in the orphanage program and the LFCT has closely studied Sister’s situation and recommended implementing a convenient micro-finance project that suits her and allows her to stay close to her daughters as she has no one else to look after them, she is their sole carer. For this reason the LFCT have encouraged Sister Hiam to learn stitching, an ideal vocation, as she can work from her house and look after her daughters.

Sister Hiam is very conscientious and receptive and has gladly listened to all of the advice. She has now been in training for six months, mastering stitching for blankets, bed covers, pillows and sheets. Sister Hiam is progressing well in her stitching classes. Unfortunately, her house is small and cramped and in order to progress her business further and work towards a secure future for her daughters, a separate room is needed for Hiam to designate for her stitching. LFCT’s partners have managed to get good price to build room measuring 4X5 meters; enough space for Hiam to work and run her business. The total cost will be £2,128.54/$USD3,350.

LFCT believes in uplifting this widow into being a successful entrepreneur. Now the opportunity has arisen to convert a widow, who previously begged for her next meal, into a successful entrepreneur and future donor, ”I want to work and not need to receive any monthly support,” explains Sister Hiam. However, the LFCT can ONLY achieve this together with YOUR valued support and donations. A little donation really can go a long way in helping Sister Hiam and her daughters realise a sustainable and happy future, away from the need for monthly support and future donor herself.

30th
Sep
2015

Newsletter September 2015 Dhu al-Qa‘dah / Dhu al-Hijjah 1436 A.H.


Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem

­­­­­­­­­­­­­

Dear Supporters – Salaamun Alaikum

APPEAL: Ophthalmology Department, Karbala – Transforming darkness into light

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This year, the LFCT has committed to transforming the lives of thousands in Karbala. A person forced to imagine the beauty of nature; a parent that can’t watch their child blossom into adulthood; a child that cannot see the comfort of a mothers embrace – these are all unfortunate realities of many people living in the Middle East. Unlike many other epidemics such as cancer or HIV/AIDS, where the cure is difficult to discover, over 80% of blindness is preventable. This equates to a staggering 800 million people that suffer unnecessarily. As we know that the eyesight of an individual naturally deteriorates with age; this proves to be the least of problems in the Middle East when acknowledging studies similar to one done in Lebanon where 231 children were studied in three blind schools in the age range of 6-20 years of age. Of these students, 70 % were blind before the age of two, meaning that the quality of life is not entirely enjoyed and many young children are forced to live a life of additional hardships. A more recent study revealed that out of 137 blind Jordanian children, 122 cases (77.7%) were found after 1970 some in which could have been treated with ease given the resources the developed countries have today. The time and date of these statistics mean that the problem is not getting better it is in fact taking a change for the worse.

The feasibility of curing blindness in middle eastern countries may appear to be a daunting task but at closer inspection one will realize that cataracts contributes up to 6.4% of health conditions in the middle east which contributes to nearly 7 million individuals that  must live with blindness  for the rest of their lives. Due to the recent surge in blindness in the Middle East from 1970 to present day, the gross domestic product has dwindled as blindness has an indirect relationship with the financial stability of that country. When a person is struck with a debilitating disease that results in blindness in the Middle East, that person then loses his/her opportunity to support their family. A domino effect then begins to play out as that person is forced into poverty and thus cannot contribute to the economy through buying and selling goods as he/she could’ve prior to the disease. The majority of people living with blindness are women, most blind people need someone to care for them, and this is usually a child, more often than not

APPEAL: Please remember Iraq’s Orphans today – Agylaa’s story:

Never in recent memory have so many children been subjected to such unspeakable brutality (Unicef, 2014).

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One story the LFCT would like to share, is the story of Agyla’a Kamal Kameil and her two young daughters, Rabbab, aged 10 and Safa’a aged 12. On the 2ndOctober 2005, when Rabbab and Safa’a were just toddlers, terrorists killed their father, Agyla’s husband. They killed him because of his Shia faith and because he followed the doctrine of Ahl al – Bayt. He was a carpenter, and led a simple life where he could support his family.

Two years after her husband’s killing, Agyla’s and her daughters were forced to migrate from their district and live in a remote, rural area, Khana Village with relatives. Whilst here, terrorists found out that Agyla’a and her family were Shia and a planted car bomb killed her father in law and resulted in Agyla’a losing her left arm serrated by shrapnel from the blast. Rabbab’s arm was also badly injured and required cosmetic surgery. It is badly scared, but she can move it now. Safa’as leg was injured and she too had surgery and cosmetic surgery to cover the bad scarring. Soon after, they fled to Karbala and live in relative safety. The children are supported by the LFCT which helps to enable them to go to school, of which, both are doing very well, but their housing remains temporary and they have a great deal of insecurity.

The story of Agyla’a and her young family is harrowing and although they may never have their father back and be forever scarred by the terrible bombing; with some assistance from the LFCT, the girls have a regular routine and their mother does not have to worry so much about their future.

Agyla’s story is typical, and the LFCT continues its long term support to Orphans in Iraq, where just GBP£30/USD$45 per month can pay for vital education, clothing, health and welfare. With all orphans of school eligible age, the funding is dependent upon them continuing to attend an educational institution. Their progress is followed closely and the impact this small monthly support makes is perfectly summed up by this Widow and her daughter when the daughter asked, “Why can’t I buy all the things I need for school? Is it because I don’t have a father, like the other children?” After receiving the sponsorship, her mother told her, “Allah has provided the means to purchase what you need through LFT.” Please help today.

APPEAL: Help a budding computer engineer complete her studies today at the Islamic University in the Gaza Strip, Palestine

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Mariam Murshed Mohammad Shaheed resides in Buriej camp, Gaza Strip, Palestine. She has 4 siblings and is hoping to start at University this September. Mariam has always performed well in exams, receiving nearly 92% in her final Secondary School examinations. A mixture of borrowing from relatives and a loan from the Ministry of Education has enabled her to complete her studies so far, but she dreams of studying Computer Engineering at University. At the moment this dream remains a hope for her and she is uncertain about what her future will hold. Generous LFCT supporters can change all of this by making a donation towards Mariam’s future today.

Mariam’s family have been greatly disadvantaged. The recent war on Gaza Strip has badly affected the family. They were forced to leave their house due to the explosions and rockets on the surrounding areas and there was great damage to their house (the walls, the windows, the roof, as well as the solar system). Much of their house still lies in a state of disrepair. This makes their economic situation extremely delicate and they dream of sending their daughter to University but their finances cannot be stretched any further. Due to the family’s bad economic situation, Mariam started studying at Al Aqsa University – in the chemistry department, where the tuition fees were less than in other Universities, but this wasn’t her true ambition and she was deeply unhappy.

Her entire course of Computer Engineering is due to last 10 semesters, over five years and tuition is expected to cos £6,236 in total, or £660 per semester with another £200 required for transportation, books and other educational materials needed for Mariam to successfully complete her studies. Just £880 will cover the first semester for Mariam. This will give her a great head start and huge advantage knowing that her studies are paid for. Please donate generously today if you would like to help Mariam.

APPEAL: The LFCT is partnering with the Ali Model School in Pakistan to provide nutritious lunches to 208 of its deprived students

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The Ali Model English School was established back in 2009, near Korangi Industrial area in Karachi, to look after the education, development and welfare of the local community. This is a very low-income community and the standard of living is below poverty line. By keeping a very minimal fee structure the school encourages children to study. More than 70% of the students are girls. The school is run by a local trust and has been running for 10 years. It aims to provide a holistic approach to education and healthcare with a focus on addressing the chronic educate gap in poorer households in Pakistan.

The school is providing excellent education and students are receiving great results, with over 85% passing. However the school’s holistic approach encompasses more than just education. The school focuses on health and nutrition, one particular aspect of which is proving lunches for children during the school week. For some children, the lunch they receive at the school will be the only lunch they would have. If lunch is not provided, most children would skip lunch and carry on studying, hungry and undernourished. Research shows there is a direct link between nutrition and growth. Children from 5 to 12 years grow very rapidly and can be very active. In Pakistan malnutrition for under 5’s in 32% (UNICEFF, 2011). By providing lunches at the school this can be avoided and children will have better concentration, health and vitality for learning.

It costs just £27 per day to provide 208 needy children with a nutritious lunch. 

When Pakistan still has such huge levels of malnutrition in the under 5’s, general food insecurity in the very poor and is a country that frequently suffers catastrophic flooding and natural disaster, this meal will be a staple meal the children can be guaranteed to receive. See what a difference your £27 could make today and feed 208 children. If just 30 generous supporters gave this amount each month, these 208 children would all have at least one nutritious meal a day to count on.

APPEAL: Give water and give life today – help 2,025 residents of Mgoli, Lakolikoje, Jambonia and Mgongeni Villages, South Pemba

Water can bring life. At the moment it is bringing sickness and poverty to residents on Pemba Island. With a small donation, you can help the LFCT to relieve this sickness and let water bring life once more.

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Shamiani Island is situated in South Pemba. It has 2,025 residents over 233 families including the elderly and young. The residents face a serious lack of services, including fresh and safe water supplies. Although wells have been dug, the water they yield is brackish, salt water from the sea, which protrudes into the water table due to the low lying island. During the summer, the wells dry up and the women of the families are often tasked with searching for a fresh water supply which often includes a journey across the sea, a perilous journey by boat. This journey is dangerous and searching for water takes up precious time that could otherwise be spent on income generation activities including agriculture, animal husbandry, crafts and fishing that can all help to lift the families out of poverty.

The LFCT have decided to partner with PEDEO to deliver a water tank and piped supply with the help of the Department of Water. There are a total of 8-9 villages on the Island of Shamiani, and the for the first phase, Lady Fatemah (as) Charitable Trust are going to assist four villages, costing £7,090 with villagers themselves will work with the government to bring the construction materials; sand, stone and pebbles and dig the necessary foundations. Please help to make this a realization and make a donation to this appeal today.

Water is such a simple necessity taken for granted at the turn of a tap. Can you imagine having to fetch water by a perilous boat journey every time you needed a glass of water? Please donate generously today.

LFCT in Pakistan: LFCT Answers the call of promising students. Working with the, Madinatul Ilm charitable trust, the trust will regularly monitor the academic progress of these students and provide regular updates to the LFCT. Remember, a timely intervention to support a single student will not only go a long way in changing lives for our coming generations but also help earn a special place for you in the eyes of Allah.

LFCT Answers the call of Sister Sara Batool who wishes to complete her BDS Degree

Madinatul Ilm charitable trust (MICT) through the continuing support of the Lady Fatemah Trust (LFT) is seeking to raise funds for Sara Batool who is attendingthe 2nd semester of an eight semester degree program of BDS at the Fatima Jinnah Dental College, Karachi, in Pakistan’s Sindh provinceSara hopes to become a qualified Dentist and embark on a career where she will be able to take care of her financially challenged family.

Sara Batool belongs to a middle class family of Karachi District in Pakistan’s Sindh province. Her father, Syed Jaffer Abbas works for a bank with a monthly income of approximately PKR 70,149.00. Her mother is a private school teacher with a monthly income of approximately PKR 15,000.00. Syed Jaffer Abbas is altogether responsible for supporting four children including Sara, making it highly difficult for him to afford his daughter’s education fee at FJ Dental College, Karachi. Faced with financial need, Sara Batool needs your financial support. She is a brilliant student and has scored Grade-A in her Higher Secondary School Certificate. It will cost just £1,480 for Sara to realise her dreams which the LFCT hope to support with generous donor’s help.

LFCT Answers the call of Syed Ali Hassan who wishes to complete his Bachelor degree of Computer Science BS (CS)

Madinatul Ilm charitable trust (MICT) through the kind support of Lady Fatemah Trust (LFT) is seeking to raise funds for Syed Ali Hassan who is attending the first semester of an eight semester program of BC (CS) at FAST University, Faisalabad CampusThough from an impoverished background, Syed hopes to obtain a graduate degree of Software Engineering and embark on a career where he will be able to take care of his financially challenged family.

Syed Ali Hassan belongs to low income family of Rawalpindi District of Pakistan’s Punjab province. His father, Syed Sibtul Hassan Shah is a school teacher with a monthly income of PKR 29,220.00. Sibtul Hassan Shah is altogether responsible for supporting three children including Syed Ali Hassan, making it extremely difficult for him to afford his son’s education at FAST University, Faisalabad Campus. Because of his family’s financial challenges, Ali Hassan faces the risk of discontinuing his education. Faced with deep financial distress, Syed needs your financial support. Help Syed to continue his studies, where he can continue achieving top ‘A’ grades, as he did in his Higher Secondary School Certificate. The cost is just £1,184.

LFCT Answers the call of Brother Zeeshan Hussein, a helpless child

Zeehan Hussainaged four, belongs to a low income family of Lahore in Pakistan’s Punjab Province. He is suffering from a chest infection and was been diagnosed with Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita, NM scoliosis 70 degree rigid LT sidedright just three months after his birth. Recently, a Professor of Orthopedics, M Asad Qureshi at the Combined Military Hospital CMH, Rawalpindi recommended a preanaesthesia evaluation for surgery to deal with this ailment. Unfortunately Zeehan’s impoverished family cannot afford the cost of such a procedure. His father, Syed Sajjad Hussain works as an area manager in SA Petroleum Services in Lahore with an income of PKR 25,000.00 per monthThe total estimated cost of this surgery is PKR 700,000.00. The family appealed to Bahria Town Hospital for this cost of surgery. However, Bahria Town Hospital could only donate PKR 400,000.00 towards the surgery. As a father of three children who are all dependent on him, Syed Sajjad Hussain cannot afford the rest of the amount for Zeehan’s surgery. The family has therefore approached The Lady Fatemah (AS) Trust (LFT) and MICT to seek rest amount of PKR 300,000.00/£1,867 for meeting the remaining cost of this child’s surgical procedure, to rid him of his life threatening condition.

Interim Project Report – Renovation of Plumbing System: Phase 1: Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi.

The first phase of the project is now in its third week and is due to be completed on Friday 18th of December 2015. The proposed renovation covers works as follows:

  • the outside plumbing and sewage system;

  • replacement of plumbing and drainage pipes, and;

  • Renovation of plumbing fixtures in the Burns and Paediatric wards.

Work commenced on the 1st of September and is due to be completed on Friday 18th of September. The construction company are working over weekends to ensure a timely completion of the renovations, but, due to the issues identified above, the construction company have requested a small extension until Monday 21st of September which has been granted by ChiraFund, the LFCT’s partner in Malawi.

Update: Progress was initially very slow. The contractor was completing another job and was slow to put a full team on at QECH. After discussions, the team was deployed and progress was faster. When the contractors started to breakdown walls and structures, the plumbing fixtures underneath were in a much worse state than was initially assessed.  This delayed work considerably and extra piping and fittings were required. During the summer months a small amount of work was carried out by hospital maintenance. This is highlighted in green in the project proposal. Funds from this have been diverted to purchase the extra fittings and piping. The proposal lacked provision for the replacement of doors and the painting of the paediatric ablution block as this was not seen as a ‘plumbing issue’, however upon inspection, this is really needed and will complete the work to a high standard.

Some Challenges: Theft is a huge issue at the hospital. While we are installing systems that are concreted into the walls, we also realise that all fittings either need to be welded or caged into the walls. ChiraFund are in ongoing discussions with the Head of Security and Chief Administrative Officer on how security is going to be managed. We have been told that a new security firm is being hired at the hospital and they hope the security will improve with this. We have asked and have been promised additional security around male wards as this is where theft is highest. Keeping the new renovations clean is going to be a challenge. Chirafund have requested hospital administration to provide the cleaners with proper cleaning equipment. As this seems unlikely to happen, we have also requested individual charities at the hospital to provide these. ChiraFund will provide the cleaners on the adult medical wards with cleaning equipment. We have requested a meeting with the heads of the other hospital charities for later this month to discuss this issue.

Evaluation of Vision, Hearing and Dental Health of 766 Iraqi Refugee Primary School Students

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Evaluation of vision and hearing before a child enters primary school has become routine in many countries. Refugee children who attend private schools that cater to their special needs – especially cultural and language skills – do not offer such services, a fact that puts these children at a disadvantage. Undetected impairments of vision and hearing are one of the reasons why children fail at school, and may cause some of them disability later on in life, most notably lazy eye syndrome.

LFCT’s partner in Iraq has therefore conducted evaluations for 766 primary students attending two schools for refugee students. A general practitioner (GP) visited each school and performed a basic vision and hearing test for all primary school students as well as examining the students’ teeth for cavities and other problems. According to medical statistics, it was expected that 10 percent of the evaluated students would suffer from problems of vision, about one percent from problems of hearing or ear disease and about 20 percent from dental defects.

The results show that the percentage of students suffering from problems of vision was slightly higher than expected (13.45 % versus 10%) while the percentage of students whose hearing was found to be deficient was much higher than expected (12.66% versus 1%). The percentage of students suffering from dental problems was almost twice as high as expected (36.4% versus 20%). Moreover, the two schools show marked differences, which can be explained by the fact that students attending Imam Ali (as) School generally come from families who are a bit better off than the families of students attending Al-Hoda School.

Fortunately, the hearing related problems were largely due to an accumulation of ear wax and were easily solved by professional ear wax removal. Unfortunately, the percentage of parents who followed up on the notification letters issued by the project’s GP was deplorably low. After two notifications, only slightly more than half of the children diagnosed with defects of vision presented for optometry and only a third for detailed evaluation of hearing although the notification letters stressed that all measures, right up to the purchase of eye glasses, were free of charge. Students diagnosed with dental problems were offered a 30% discount at a dental charity clinic. Due to budget constraints, LFCT’s partner is unable to cover the cost of dental treatment and hence did not receive any feedback about the number of children who consulted the clinic’s dentists.

LFCT’s partner intends to continue the programme in the 2015-2016 academic year, which begins in the last week of September. First-graders in both schools will be evaluated. At the same time, the GPs working for the project will conduct an intensive awareness-raising program to alert parents to the importance of their children’s vision and hearing. The total cast was £1,007.19.

Report: Successful installation of water connection and storage tank for vital rural health clinic in Shumbageni, South Pemba

The LFCT have worked successfully with PEDEO in Pemba to install a water storage tank for a vital rural health clinic and provide relief to doctors, nurses and patients alike.

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Wambaa is a small village in Shumbageni, in the south of Pemba Island. It is home to a small but essential health clinic for all living in and around the village. The LFCT assists with numerous clean and safe water supply projects in Pemba as there is a drastic shortage of potable water. The health clinic is no exception. There is no running water at the clinic and the staff have to spend precious time when they could be treating patients collecting water form over a kilometre away. This is then transported where there is further risk of pathogens and disease entering the water.

Water is essential, particularly in a health setting, a place that people go to when they are at their most vulnerable. The clinic is the first stop for primary health care in Wambaa and the surrounding areas and is frequented by the young and old alike. Prior to the water tank being installed, the health centre staff faced great inconvenience, having to fetch water from a nearby well with staff themselves carrying the water on their heads. This was far from ideal. Every day the staff fetched the water which took away precious time from treating sick patients. The patients also dreaded going to the centre and often opted to use another clinic further away, causing them great inconvenience.

This project was completed and began providing services officially on the morning of 31/08/2015. The staff have agreed to protect and care for the tank so that the storage facility will continue long into the future. The cost of the project was £1,421.42.

Thank you.

28th
Oct
2015

Newsletter October 2015 Dhul-Hijjah 1436 A.H. / Muharram 1437 A.H.


Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­

Dear Supporters – Salaamun Alaikum

APPEAL: Ophthalmology Department, Karbala – Transforming darkness into light

october newsletter 1This year, the LFCT has committed to transforming the lives of thousands in Karbala. A person forced to imagine the beauty of nature; a parent that can’t watch their child blossom into adulthood; a child that cannot see the comfort of a mother’s embrace – these are all unfortunate realities of many people living in the Middle East. Unlike many other epidemics such as cancer or HIV/AIDS, where the cure is difficult to discover, over 80% of blindness is preventable. This equates to a staggering 800 million people that suffer unnecessarily. As we know that the eyesight of an individual naturally deteriorates with age; this proves to be the least of problems in the Middle East when acknowledging studies similar to one done in Lebanon where 231 children were studied in three blind schools in the age range of 6-20 years of age. Of these students, 70 % were blind before the age of two, meaning that the quality of life is not entirely enjoyed and many young children are forced to live a life of additional hardships. A more recent study revealed that out of 137 blind Jordanian children, 122 cases (77.7%) were found after 1970 some in which could have been treated with ease given the resources the developed countries have today. The time and date of these statistics mean that the problem is not getting better it is in fact taking a change for the worse.

The feasibility of curing blindness in middle eastern countries may appear to be a daunting task but at closer inspection one will realize that cataracts contributes up to 6.4% of health conditions in the middle east which contributes to nearly 7 million individuals that must live with blindness for the rest of their lives. Due to the recent surge in blindness in the Middle East from 1970 to present day, the gross domestic product has dwindled as blindness has an indirect relationship with the financial stability of that country. When a person is struck with a debilitating disease that results in blindness in the Middle East, that person then loses his/her opportunity to support their family. A domino effect then begins to play out as that person is forced into poverty and thus cannot contribute to the economy through buying and selling goods as he/she could’ve prior to the disease. The majority of people living with blindness are women, most blind people need someone to care for them, and this is usually a child, more often than not.

APPEAL: Iraq’s Orphans Mohammed and Ahmad’s Story

LFCT Donors, please donate generously. It costs just GBP£30.00/US$45.00 per Orphan per month.

 Mohammed and Ahmad Salim Jamal are brothers who lost their father in the Iraq war. Ahmad was just two months old when his father was killed, whilst Mohammed was just a year and a half. The family lived in Baghdad in Al Faris Village near to Khan Dhari District. Mohammed and Ahmad’s parents worked as farmers, planting and rearing vegetables and selling them in Abu Ghreeb District to bring in a valuable income. It was a simple life, but the family were together and supported each other when times became tough.

One day, in 2005 Mohammed and Ahmad’s father went to the market to sell crops with his brother and cousins. It was an ordinary day in the war and the family had to try and carry on with life as much as possible. However, this day was to affect the family forever.

As the bus that Mohammed and Ahmad’s father and relatives were on travelled to market, an unknown armed group randomly opened fire on one of the US forces close by. The bus was caught in the gunfire and all relatives suffered gunshot wounds. They were rushed to hospital but later sadly passed away due to their wounds.

Mohammed and Ahmad’s mother was devastated when she first heard about the news. She continued to stay in the modest clay family home in Al Faris Village. They lived this way for some time before one day, she received a death threat from the same unknown armed group. They ordered her to leave her house due to her Shia beliefs. Early in 2006 she was forced to migrate and travelled to Karbala with her two small children where she found safety and tranquillity. The family now resides with her mother, brother, his wife and their six children in a cramped house.

The family is part of the Orphan support scheme, receiving 100,000ID/£54.97 each month so that she can help support her two children. There are many more destitute widows and orphans across Iraq that need some help to get them back on their feet. No one has been spared from the effects of violence and war in Iraq, and since 2003 the number of orphaned children in the country has escalated into a humanitarian crisis. Please help the LFCT to strengthen its support and scope for the orphans of Iraq and provide some comfort, security and care where it is most needed.

A new way to help support the LFCT’s work! Raise money for The Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust whilst you shop – with no extra cost for you!

Get started today!

october newsletter 2

Give as you Live is a shopping and price comparison website with a heart. You can shop for products from thousands of leading online retailers; use our price comparison tool to ensure you get the best price and even save money by using the exclusive offers and deals available on our site.

Don’t forget, a percentage of every purchase you make will be donated to charity.

So far Give as You Live has helped raise £6,438,377.76 for 7,500 charities

 Isn’t it time some of that also went to the LFCT?

Sign up today for FREE and you can raise some funds to go towards projects with some of the worlds neediest communities.

Visit https://www.giveasyoulive.com/causes#/ to sign up in just a few minutes. Follow the instructions online to learn more – we recommend installing the shopping bar which means you don’t even have to remember to visit the give as you live website to raise money.

Just think that you could be raising money whilst doing your weekly food shop, buying Birthday or celebration gifts or even holidays. Please take a look today –5 minutes of your time to sign up could help to raise vital funds towards education projects, providing clean water and sanitation or helping a cataract patient today. Thank you. 

LFCT in Ethiopia: A great project gets underway – Income Generation Opportunity for Rural Pastoralist Widow Households through Dairy Goat Distribution in Ethiopia

october newsletter 3The organization for Help Out (OHO) secured a grant fund of £6380.39 in September 2015 to implement a dairy goat project in two selected agro-pastoral villages of Ginner districts in Bale Zone of Oromia Regional State in Ethiopia with 200 widow headed households. The major objectives of the project were; To lift the vulnerable rural widows in selected agro-pastoral areas out of the low-asset trap through provision of reproductive goats that can contribute to income generation and food security; to complement the food security of targeted female headed households and to restock the livestock resource base of the targeted female-headed households by distributing dairy goats.

The project achieved the principal milestones set out in its work plans and completed start-up activities including developing criteria for selection of restocking beneficiaries, identification and actual selection of beneficiaries, establishment and strengthening of goat purchasing and support committees, identification of purchasing procedures and markets, the purchasing of goats and the vaccination of goats and actual distribution of the goats to the selected beneficiaries.

The goats distributed are appropriate for the beneficiaries and their agro-ecological conditions. Due to the high reproductive rate of goats, large numbers of offspring can be produced over a short and economically reasonable period of time. This will ensure an aggregate increase in livestock holding of the target community within short time, providing great opportunity for the rebuilding of herd stock and generating good income to reduce poverty among them.

OHO followed a basic but systematic approach for the implementation of the project. Primarily it ensured stakeholders’ participation. For instance, it involved the relevant government offices and community representatives in key project activities. This process succeeded in building a strong sense of ownership for the project among stakeholders, built stakeholder support, facilitated the project implementation without any delay and laid the groundwork for the sustainability of the project.

During the reporting period two Dairy Goats Support Committees were established both at the District and Pastoralist village levels. Each Dairy Goats Support Committees has five members (1 male and 4 female). The committee members were drawn from local elders, members of ‘Kebele’/sub-district administrations and primary beneficiaries. The Goats Support Committees are well organized and develop their own bylaws providing a clear division of responsibilities among the chair, co-chair and members. The committees have very important roles and functions in the project. They provide different support to the project and the beneficiaries. At the initial stage they were involved in beneficiary identification, selection of breed types, specific goat types of a given breed, etc. Further updates on the outcomes achieved to follow as this exciting project develops.

LFCT in Tanzania: Four more Pemba island villages now have clean water at their doorstep thanks to generous LFCT supporters

october newsletter 4Two water storage tanks and taps have been successfully installed by the LFCT’s local partner in Pemba, PEDEO. This project was implemented in the four villages of Mgoli, Lakolikoje Jambonia and Mgongeni. Together these villages have 987 residents, including the elderly and young children. These villagers are split across 103 families.

For their whole lives, residents of all four villages have lacked the essential services of clean and safe water close to their homes. This has caused major disruption, stress and unhappiness. A few pre-existing boreholes have been re-dug and water utilized from these, however this water is brackish, miring with salt water from the high water table and close proximity to the sea. This made adults and children alike sick. In addition, in the summer these already insufficient boreholes dried up and villages were forced to make a long journey in search of safe water.

Similarly, these villages did have access to an existing piped water system but it was extremely inconsistent. Some weeks it was only available for two days, and at other times if only flowed at night but dripped in the day. This uncertainty coupled with numerous precious hours spent searching for water meant villagers livelihood suffered. They were deprived of enough time to devote to various income generating activities including agriculture production, farming, fishing and crafts. These livelihoods are vital for putting food on the table and sending the children to school.

This project is commissioned and started providing water on the official date of 20/10/2015. All residents have started to benefit well from the project, including the eliminations of any previous stresses and worries around sourcing safe water, and having enough time to dedicate to their livelihood and generate vital income. 

LFCT in Malawi: Renovation of Plumbing System: Phase 1, Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi. 

october newsletter 5october newsletter 6After several decades of heavy utilisation, the physical condition of the plumbing system at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre has deteriorated to an unusable state with blocked sewage systems, broken and leaking pipes, unsuitable toilets, and broken showers. The antiquated sewage system is now also unable to cope with the high volume of patients and guardians that currently use them. These problems, compounded by poor waste management on site, have led to rats and other vermin taking residence near the wards.

Although routine maintenance and ad hoc repair works have been carried out over the years, the current state of the plumbing system presents significant infection control risks and compromises the care and dignity of the patients. The LFCT is working with Chirafund in Malawi to renovate the plumbing system.

The stated objective of the project was “To renovate the plumbing system (including bathrooms, ward sinks, indoor and outdoor plumbing and sewerage systems) of Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), Blantyre in order to reduce the risk of hospital based infections and thereby improve the care and dignity of patients”.

This project will take place over five phases with Phase 1 focussed on renovation of the external plumbing system, as well as of the internal plumbing of the Burns and Paediatric Wards.

 Immediate attention was given to external plumbing issues for two reasons:

1.     To have it completed before the next rainy season in Malawi starts (usually around mid to late November), and;

2.     As the proposed internal works will be completed more efficiently once the external issues have been fixed.

For the internal works, and based on greatest need, the project carried out internal plumbing work on the Burns ward, including work to internal sinks and ablution facilities, and secondly to renovation of the Paediatric special needs toilets.

Completed renovations include:

External plumbing and sewage system; Clearing of blocked drains; replacement of water supply and drainage piping; placement of concrete slabs over (previously uncovered) all manholes, and; placement of new wash troughs complete with concrete slabs.

Burns Ward: Partial renovation to the male and female toilets (including replacement of plumbing fixtures and unblocking toilets and showers); repairs to sinks and tiling around these plumbing fixtures; painting of ablution blocks, and; fixing of taps and sinks in various wards.

Paediatric toilets: Painting of walls; replacement of broken ceiling boards; fixing of leaks; replacement of water supply and drainage pipes; replacement of showers, toilets and some fittings; new concrete floors installed in showers to allow for better drainage of water, and; replacement of cisterns and their security cages.

Work commenced on the 1st of September and was completed on the 10th of October.  

To date, the project has come in slightly below budget. Withholding Tax of 4% was deducted from the final bill for Malawi Revenue Authority.  The small surplus will be added to the next phase. Phase 1 has meant lots of learning has been taken forward including:

  • Chirafund needs to do, or contract, a more thorough assessment of the required works at QECH before determining the remaining work needed and its cost. This is also needed so that Chirafund can give a more accurate quote to the funder and so that the appointed construction company is fully aware of the work they need to undertake and can quote accurately and accordingly.

  • Chirafund needs to request that the next construction firm provides a fully qualified project manager who will be onsite at all times.

  • Chirafund needs to put a financial penalty system in place in the next contract in order to try and ensure a reduction or removal of the delays that have plagued Phase I of the project and that will reduce inefficiencies on the part of the contractor.

  • Due to the high levels of poverty and poor security, theft is a huge issue at the hospital. Although Chirafund is installing systems that are protected as much as possible, such as by fixtures being concreted into the walls, it also realises that other fittings either need to be welded or caged into place so as to prevent their removal. ChiraFund is in ongoing discussions with the Head of Security and the Chief Administrative Officer on how security can be managed and improved. Chirafund has been told that a new security firm is being hired at the hospital and that Hospital Administration is hopeful that this will result in improved security. Chirafund has specifically asked for, and has been promised, additional security around male wards as this is where the highest levels of theft are.

  • Maintaining and keeping the new renovations clean is going to be a challenge. To address this, Chirafund has already implemented a new cleaning regime on the Adult Medical wards and the Children’s Medical Care Malawi  have stated that they are willing to buy the materials needed to ensure this for the paediatric wards.

  • ChiraFund instigated a meeting of all charities on November 3rd to discuss all of the above issues and to engender a broader, more concerted approach to their resolution

ChiraFund has invited the Head of Paediatrics and the Chief Hospital Administrator to an official opening and placement of plaques on Friday 23rd of October- (pictures to follow)

APPEAL: PHASE 2: Renovation of Paediatric Oncology Ablution Block. LFCT Donors, please donate generously towards this noble project

It is hard to believe that any human, let alone a child with cancer has to use these toilets.

To renovate the Paediatric Oncology ablution block of Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, (QECH) Blantyre in order to reduce the risk of hospital based infections to children already suffering from cancer and thereby improve the care and dignity of paediatric patients and the guardians who care for them.

Nosocomial illness – due to disease-causing organisms spreading between individuals in hospital – is an important risk in crowded wards such as these, for example, the children on the Oncology wards are immunocompromised and therefore particularly susceptible to infections.   The risk of acquiring a nosocomial infection is highest in each ward’s toilet and ablutions block, where up to 200 people share the same seats, sinks, taps, showers and towels.  They also share the same floor – on which most walk bare-foot.

The plumbing system, especially the toilet and sink facilities need frequent renovation, as well as thorough and regular cleaning.   At present we recognize that without a complete overhaul, the now ageing system is impossible to clean adequately and are a constant health hazard.  We would like to renovate these with good-quality components and to a design that will allow effective ventilation and efficient cleaning.

The proposed renovation works will cover repairs to: the plumbing and sewage system; replacement of showers, toilets and fittings, re-painting of walls; replacement of floors where necessary to improve drainage, replacement of plumbing and drainage pipes and replacement of ceilings and repair to roof.

3rd Appeal under Salima Memorial Medical Education Project – Orphan Sister Hayfa Ali BAZZI from Bint Jbeil South Lebanon wishing to complete Vocational Nursing Technical Baccaloureate B.T. Please help today.

october newsletter 7My name is Haifa Bazzi, I am 25 years old, I finished TS2 at Imam Sadr Foundation and I am continuing my Nursing Bachelor of Sciences at the Islamic University of Lebanon (I have already finished two years). In fact, I am working at Jabal Amel Hospital and I am the only financial supporter of my family. Al Hamdulillah there is an association called Lady Fatemah that just saved my academic life for my last year in Nursing Care; without you I was quitting because I can no more support debts and on the same time afford an acceptable decent life to my family! Now, I revived again by the will of Allah to continue my holy message of Sayyidah Fatima (a.s.) and Sayyidah Zaynab (a.s): Nursing Humanitarian Care.”

It will cost just £3,173 for Haifa to fulfil her dreams and study nursing care. Please help Haifa today so that she can help others.

LFCT in Lebanon: Help Sister Farah, a promising young nurse today care for those less fortunate

I want to develop my skills and have an advanced Nursing degree in order to help my country and help my parents in their expenses because their income is not sufficient. I also want to give the best service to my patients and help them alleviate their sufferings and be able, by the help of God inshallah, to let them enjoy a better health and a better life!” Farrah Assi

25 years old, Farah is resident of Al-Chahabieh, South Lebanon. She lives with her mother, father and two siblings. Farah Ahmad Assi has a dream of becoming a nurse and helping her country – help her make this a reality today. Farah has a dream of attending the Imam Sadr Foundation’s Nursing Vocational School. She is a bright student who gained 15/20 in her Superior Technical in Nursing Care. Farah would like to continue her career in health and study Community Nursing Care at the Islamic University of South Lebanon. The course will cost $4,800 USD/ £3,127.40 with the first year costing $3,200/ £2,084.94.

For Farrah, it is very important that she pursues a career where she can give something back to her community and contribute to humanitarian work in Lebanon. She is a promising student who, without the help of the LFCT might be forced to stop her studies. Her parents are poor and Farrah has already accrued debt to pay for her previous course of study. Farrah has a whole career ahead of her that she is determined to dedicate to the health and wellbeing of those less fortunate.

Farrah’s passion is clear. Please help her to live her dream and study to become a nurse today. Please donate generously and support this promising humanitarian.

LFCT in Bangladesh: Helping to unlock the potential in Bangladesh’s youth today 

The LFCT would like to initially support the capital costs of this excellent project that will empower young people in Bangladesh to take control of their own futures and help lift themselves out of poverty into sustainable income generating activities. The LFCT will support its partner in Bangladesh to deliver this project over the next 12 months and is appealing to the LFCT’s dedicated supporters to help make this a reality.

The aim of this project is to increase the level of education and awareness of young girls and boys in the project area, empowering them and enhancing their capabilities through: (i) vocational training; (ii) life skills education; (iii) leadership and empowerment training; (iv) entrepreneurship training (v) mainstreaming into government schools and (vi) advocacy around key social issues. It is hoped that this will in turn help to;

  • increase the level of education and awareness of young girls and boys in the project area, empowering them and enhancing their capabilities through mainstreaming to government schools, life skills education, leadership and empowerment training, livelihood training and business assistance.

  • Enhance the skills of adolescent girls and boys through community based vocational training courses to help improve their employability.

  • To promote the role of young girls and boys in the social, economic and cultural development of their village.

  • To establish a network setup with Union Parishads (similar to District Councils) through which the adolescent girls and boys will be able to raise their voices on relevant issues i.e. child marriage, gender based violence etc.

  • To contribute to the formulation of national poverty eradication policies.

  • To establish community ownership of the project for sustainability and future replication.

  • This project will work with 740 adolescent girls and boys in Barguna District, Bangladesh, to increase their access to education, provide them with vocational training, life skills, leadership skills and business training. In addition, this project will work with girls, boys, their families and communities to equip them with the knowledge and tools to understand their rights, advocate for girl’s rights, be informed about gender discrimination, violence and child marriage and take action towards preventing this. The proposed project area is Barguna District situated in the southern part of Bangladesh. Barguna is a poor coastal area prone to natural disasters with the economy depending on agriculture and fishing. 

In October 2014, UNICEF reported that Bangladesh has approximately 2.9 million adolescents aged 10-19 years. At over 30% of the demographic (BBS, 2008) 15 – 25 year olds dominate the economically active population. A large number of this young demographic migrate for work, having come from poor, rural disadvantaged backgrounds. Here Bangladesh’s youth face a variety of obstacles in their access to employment, education, health care and exercising their rights. They often work in hazardous roles, such as labourers, rickshaw pullers, domestic servants and sex workers.  They often are self-employed in the informal sector or remain unemployed and become associated with crime. Perhaps the most significant challenge facing Bangladesh’s youth is the transition from education to the labour market. Enrolment in technical and vocational education is especially low in Bangladesh, where it represents just four per cent of total admission, with less than one per cent girls. Barriers to girls’ education in Bangladesh include negative attitudes toward female education, household work burdens and long journeys to school. 

Vocational training can overcome many of these barriers and equip young people with the skills they need for the rest of their lives. You can make a difference today by donating to this project and help give a young person the start to their career that they so desperately want. 

Please help support this project today and give the gift of knowledge and training – a gift that will unlock the potential in Bangladesh. The LFCT aims to support the capital costs of this project at £2,257.

Thank you.

30th
Nov
2015

Newsletter Novemeber 2015 Muharram / Safar1437 A.H.


Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem

Dear Supporters – Salaamun Alaikum

UPDATE AND APPEAL: Ophthalmology Department, Karbala – Transforming darkness into light

newsletter 1This year, the LFCT has committed to transforming the lives of thousands in Karbala. A person forced to imagine the beauty of nature; a parent that can’t watch their child blossom into adulthood; a child that cannot see the comfort of a mother’s embrace – these are all unfortunate realities of many people living in the Middle East. Unlike many other epidemics such as cancer or HIV/AIDS, where the cure is difficult to discover, over 80% of blindness is preventable. This equates to a staggering 800 million people that suffer unnecessarily.

Ophthalmic Equipment Funded by LFCT in Al Taybeh area; casa of Marjeyoun / South Lebanon – FIRST PROGRESS REPORT 1 – Trimester 3, 2015

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Aim: Preventive and Curative interventions for at risk populations (chronically ill; mainly Diabetics, in high raise in this region, people with eye difficulties or deficiencies, children in schools for preventive detection, Syrian refugees and vulnerable populations.

The Lady Fatemah (a.s.) Charity Trust (LFCT) has fully equipped an ophthalmology clinic for screening diagnosis in the primary healthcare of Dayr Syriane (Al Taybeh area; casa of Marjeyoun / South Lebanon). The primary healthcare centre of Dayr Syriane (owned by Imam Sadr Foundation) is a part of the Ministry of Public Health network of primary healthcare centres. It follows the standards of quality of Accreditation-Canada (customized to the Lebanese Context). The centre offers specialized medical consultations in General Medicine, Cardiology, Gynaecology, Neurology, Paediatrics, Endocrinology, Orthopaedics Rheumatology, Dermatology, ENT and Ophthalmology (etc…) in addition to Dental Care, Vaccination Program, Mental Health and Elderly Care (Year 2015 total statistics: 1156 patients, 4076 services). 

The clinic began to receive patients from July 2015, aiming to detect abnormalities in the eye in order to prevent further complications, especially for chronically ill people. As a beginning, the LFCT equipped ophthalmic clinic screened 70 patients (24 chronic and 46 non-chronic) for Trimester 3. The next steps of the clinic are to present services to the public school of the village, screening the eyesight of elementary school students and therefore being able to save many expected eye diseases through early intervention of Imam Sadr Foundation medical and paramedical teams.

Due to the recent surge in blindness in the Middle East from 1970 to present day, the gross domestic product has dwindled as blindness has an indirect relationship with the financial stability of that country. When a person is struck with a debilitating disease that results in blindness in the Middle East, that person then loses his/her opportunity to support their family. A domino effect then begins to play out as that person is forced into poverty and thus cannot contribute to the economy through buying and selling goods as he/she could’ve prior to the disease. The majority of people living with blindness are women, most blind people need someone to care for them, and this is usually a child, more often than not.

APPEAL: Iraq’s Orphans Karrar’s Story – Iraq’s future is in their hands.

newsletter 3

LFCT Donors, please donate generously. It costs just GBP£30.00/US$45.00 per Orphan per month. One story the LFCT would like to share this month is that of eight-year-old Karrar Haider Hameed Shahid. He lives with his mother in Kerbala. When Karrar was just a baby his father was killed one day in a brutal and unprovoked attack. His father was mistaken as belonging to a Sectarian divide to which terrorists decided he should die. The brutal attack left Karrar without a father and his mother, Entsar, without a Husband. Entsar was terrified for hers and Karrar’s safety, fearing that they too may have their lives taken in an act of indiscriminate terrorism. They left their home town to seek safety with Entsar’s extended family in Karbala. They now reside in a cramped house with over 20 members of the family. For Entsar and Karrar however, family life will never be the same after the trauma and loss they suffered.

Residing in a cramped environment, resources are thinly spread out between the family and so the £30 that Entsar receives as a monthly support from the LFCT goes a long way to ensuring she can cover Karrar’s basic needs. Like any mother, Karrar has grand dreams for her son and hopes he will be happy and can live a normal life as possible, minimising the scars of growing up without a father.

159 Orphans and 66 Extremely Vulnerable Refugee Families in the Middle East Were Sponsored in the Third Quarter of 2015. A Total of 667 Sponsorships Were Paid but there are so many more Orphans waiting for help.

The LFCT’s Orphan support scheme, means that orphans receive just under £30 per month which provides vital support for a more comfortable life where children can focus on getting their education and do not have to worry about where their next meal comes from. Please donate generously and sign up to sponsor an orphan today, Thank you.  

So as for the orphan don’t oppress him” Surah ad-Dhuhaa, verse 9

APPEAL: The Renovation of the Plumbing System at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi

PHASE III: Renovation of Labour Ward-Ablution Blocks (two) and Sluice rooms (two)

newsletter 4newsletter 5

  “Thank you so much to LFCT for making such transformation possible. What we had before was not fit for anyone, certainly not for children with cancer. The next phase is about improving the Labour Ward. Thank you for making this phase possible. God Willing, it will help many mothers and babies for many years to come.” Arri Coomarasamy, MBChB, MD, FRCOG, Professor of Gynaecology, Institute of Metabolism and System Research, University of Birmingham, UK

 The objective of this phase is to renovate the ablution blocks and sluice rooms on the labour ward of Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, (QECH) Blantyre in order to reduce the risk of hospital based infections to new born babies with their mothers and thereby improve the care and dignity of the mothers and the guardians who care for them.

The proposed renovation works will cover repairs to: the plumbing and sewage system; replacement of showers, toilets and fittings, re-painting of walls; replacement of floors where necessary to improve drainage, replacement of plumbing and drainage pipes and replacement of ceilings and repair to roof to two sets of ablution facilities and to two sluice rooms. Every day over thirty children are born on the Labour ward of QECH. That is almost 11,000 new babies per year.

QECH was built in 1958 and at the time was considered the pinnacle of hospital facilities in Malawi. Today, nearly 60 years later, the buildings are cramped, owing not only to the HIV epidemic but also to an approximately 5-fold increase in Malawi’s population since 1958.  The wards are therefore no longer able to meet the needs of sick patients, let alone their guardians and families, or indeed the medical staff that work there. Statistics reveal the current problem of overcrowding with, for example, the 50-bed women’s ward regularly housing over 70 patients, and sometimes over 100. This overcrowding results in mattresses being placed on the floor between beds and even in corridors. In addition, nursing & medical staff regularly work under extremely difficult circumstances with very limited resources.

QECH is also the major clinical teaching site for Malawi’s only medical school, with over 100 medical students based at QECH each day during the academic year. The labour ward is used as a training place for the reproductive health quality improvement program in Malawi. These graduates are Malawi’s newest doctors and midwives – who will take their experience to district hospitals and health centres throughout the country. We also believe that if they learn their clinical practice in a positive, patient-supportive environment, they will translate this to wherever they work elsewhere in Malawi. 

The importance of creating the conditions within which sick patients can be cared for in suitable and comfortable surroundings, as well as accommodating the guardians and families who assist with their care, has long been recognised.

This phase will cost MMK 6,999,750.00/ £7,789.21.

Please donate generously today to help this leading hospital become even better and provide needs for generations to come. The Chira Fund who are overseeing the renovations in Malawi have taken into consideration the most cost effective way to realise the project without sacrificing the quality and have already built in measures of sustainability including extending the sourced out cleaning services to wards like Paediatrics and advise them on the type of equipment that they should use in a hospital set up, and intensifying Health Education talks to guardians and patients on the proper use of ablution facilities.

Thank you for your help.

REMINDER: Have you signed up yet to raise money for the LFCT for FREE? A new way to help support the LFCT’s work! Raise money for The Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust whilst you shop – with no extra cost for you!

Get started today!

Give as you Live is a shopping and price comparison website with a heart. You can shop for products from thousands of leading online retailers; use our price comparison tool to ensure you get the best price and even save money by using the exclusive offers and deals available on our site.

Don’t forget, a percentage of every purchase you make will be donated to charity.

So far Give as You Live has helped raise £6,438,377.76 for 7,500 charities

 Isn’t it time some of that also went to the LFCT?

Sign up today for FREE and you can raise some funds to go towards projects with some of the worlds neediest communities.

Visit https://www.giveasyoulive.com/causes#/ to sign up in just a few minutes. Follow the instructions online to learn more – we recommend installing the shopping bar which means you don’t even have to remember to visit the give as you live website to raise money.

Just think that you could be raising money whilst doing your weekly food shop, buying Birthday or celebration gifts or even holidays. Please take a look today –5 minutes of your time to sign up could help to raise vital funds towards education projects, providing clean water and sanitation or helping a cataract patient today. Thank you. 

LFCT in Pakistan: Pure water for Students and Villagers alike: Ali Model School and inhabitants of Awami Colony benefit as water begins to flow

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Partnering with the LFCT, the Masomeen Welfare Trust in Karachi have facilitated the installment of a reverse osmosis plant to serve Ali Model School and surrounding community. In 2014, Masomeen Welfare Trust realized with agony that the water that was currently provided to the Ali Model School was far from safe and contained numerous bacteria when tested in a lab. The sample showed that the water was not fit for human consumption due to the water source’s position running parallel to a drain. Unknowingly, this was exposing teachers and students at the school to Typhoid, Diarrhea, Vomiting, Typhoid and other harmful diseases.

A water purifier was decided to be the appropriate course of action. The plant would be installed and would provide water to students free of cost, enabling them to remain healthy. The project was decided to be extended beyond the staff and students at the school to the local Masjid, nursery and community. The project was started in mid-September and was complete by the 25th October. A free flow of water was not possible for the community supply and therefore a new machine had to be added to pump the water from the basement to 2nd floor. With the addition of these gadgets the water supply is smooth and consistent.

A local vendor was short listed and appointed to install the unit, based on cost and previous good track record. On October 25th the plant was installed and become operation. It supplies water to five different places within the locality. Overall it supplied to in excess of 4,400 residents of Awami Colony.

  • Nursery school with more than 40 students

  • Primary and secondary school with more than 450 students and teachers

  • Masjid with attendance of more than 300 Namazis

  • Community water outlet across the school for more than 3500 inhabitants. They take water in the morning and evening

  • Water cooler installed between Masjid and School for further community sue. This is being fetched by almost 100 inhabitants daily

Awami Colony inhabitants dreamt of getting pure, clean and safe filtered water at their doorsteps.  This dream was fulfilled by The Lady Fâtemah (a.s.) Charitable Trust, a gift they never expected.

It is too early to state the impact in terms of preventing diseases, however at the moment the entire community is getting pure water by the installation of the reverse osmosis water filtration plant. Water is available twice a day and available 24 hours a day to Masjid and through the water cooler. Currently the water is only used for consumption, but there are hopes it can be used for other daily needs in the future. 

There are no words to say thanks. We are feeling proud to have this facility, thank you so much,” Awami Colony resident

Thank you LFCT. You just gave us opportunity to get pure and fresh water,” Awami Colony resident

We would like to thank LFCT a lot for this project. It is our dream to get pure and fresh water,” Class 10 student, Ali Model School

The project is a great step by the LFCT for students and staff and also residents of the colony. We strongly appreciate LFCT for this project,” Vice Priniciple, Ali Model School

LFCT in Pakistan:  23 young men start their futures today – successful completion and passing of Air-condition and Fridge repair course in Pakistan

The LFCT is proud to have supported an air conditioning and fridge repair course at the SOS Technical Institute in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. The course was passed by 23 young men from marginalised backgrounds.

20 young men have been supported by the LFCT to complete a three-month course in fridge and air conditioning repair. The cohort comprised of 25 students in total, with 23 completing the course. Two left due to unplanned reasons; one a fracture of his hand, the other is sue to start a vegetable shop with his brother. The course was facilitated and implemented by SOS Villages and the young men ae all excited by the opportunities that will now open up for them.

They were awarded with certificates in a presentation ceremony from the Chairperson of SOS villages. The young men wanted to describe to generous LFCT donors what completing the course means to them:

I was living a useless life in village. Now I have a trade in my hand that will help me to work in my own settlement.”

No one cared about me because I was jobless and had no expertise to utilize for earning bread for my family. I am thankful to LFCT for the help.”

Air-condition and fridge repair is a growing industry in the country and abroad. From the statements it is clear what a positive impact this course has had. It has the potential to have a huge impact on the lives of the young men, making them economically independent and able to sustainably support their families. It is now hoped that multiple options will open up, including starting their own business or moving into waged employment for a repairs company.

LFCT in Pakistan: Nutritious lunches for all – no child will go hungry or malnourished at the Ali Model School in Pakistan, thanks to generous LFCT supporters

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LFCT Donors. It costs GB£ 0.14/US$0.20 per lunch per child ONLY.

 Ali Model School is located in Korangi, a slum area of Karachi, Pakistan, where family earning is much below the poverty line. There is often only one breadwinner in a family of at least eight members. Ali Model English School opened its nursery section in early summer 2015 with an initial 36 students. During the lunch break, only a few children can afford bring their own lunch whilst all others can do is watch. The Ali Model School, local donors and the LFCT decided to break this pathetic and desperate situation and enable children a balanced diet with enough iron and protein, common deficiencies in Pakistan. We have worked with local donors so that we can extend this school lunch programme across the whole of the Ali Model School. The project aims to provide free, hygienically prepared and nutritionally balanced lunch to the entire nursery and primary section, totaling almost 200 students.

Stage One: With the help of local donors we have started providing lunch to 36 students in the nursery stage. The menu was designed with the help of a nutritionist and we hired a lunch time supervisor (consequently providing a job to a local lady) to prepare and serve the lunch. The students were very excited to have a balanced and nutritionally rich lunch. The parents were very thankful for this initiative.

Stage Two: With rich and healthy food to entire nursery, the Trust again identified a gap with the students of primary age (up to class two) who are also young and very few can afford to have lunch in their break. We searched to a suitable donor for support where we came across The Lady Fâtemah (a.s.) Charitable Trust of UK who agreed to support us in this noble act. The Trust will provide the fund on the monthly basis to enable all children a nutritious lunch. In this project we hired a few supporting people to prepare the lunch for more than 200 students. We used the services of a national nutritionist to develop their lunch and from 1st of October we started providing lunches to entire students across the nursery and Primary School.

Students of Ali Model nursery, and now the primary section are enthralled to get such a fantastic lunch which is nutritionally balanced and hygienic. With this initiative we also provided job opportunities to five new female employees. In addition, the program also teaches the children about the principles of eating together in a disciplined way, the essence of togetherness and habits of good eating. The parents appreciate the initiative and thanks with lot of Duas to our sponsor The Lady Fâtemah (a.s.) Charitable Trust and supporter for providing lunch and teaching the art of good habits.

Able to walk and play again – thank you LFCT donors for helping little Saif!

Saif Haider Hamzah Erhaim is just one year and eight months old. Saif is a lovely little child, happy and full of life, but he has been through great trauma and needed the help of generous LFCT supporters to get through a difficult time. Saif was born with a birth defect on his right ankle, ankle disarticulation. Although doctors tried to seek a solution, it was decided that Said would suffer less in the long run if his leg was amputated above the ankle on his low shin area. Saif was brought to Al Kafeel Dynamics after his amputation to see if there was any hope of Saif ever walking again. At Al Kafeel Dynamics it was recommended that Saif would be ideally suited to a synthetic prosthetic custom foot with a soft and hard lamination socket. Saif has now had this limb made and fitted.

It is fantastic news that Saif will be able to walk again and adjust to life with a prosthetic limb. The prosthetic limb would specifically created for Saif and will be vital at the time in his life when he learns to walk for the first time, like any other child. It is fantastic that Saif is able to have a prosthetic limb from this early age and he can now be expected to learn to adapt to walking much more easily and will be able to learn to walk at a pace that is natural for him. The prosthetic is good for at least one year or more, and then he will need a larger size limb as he grows and adjusts.

On behalf of the child’s family as well as DRF, LFCT’s local partner, we would like to express our gratitude and appreciation for your generous sponsorship and the helping hand that LFCT extended.

LFCT in India: Desperate to start earning for himself again – the LFCT lends a helping hand to Kashmir flood victim

Syed Mohammad Rizvi lives in Iskanderpora Village in Kashmir, India. He is 31 years old. He lives with his family and is the main breadwinner after his elderly father.

In September 2014 the Kashmir region of India was hit by disastrous floods. Several hundred people died and the economic impacts have been far reaching. Farmers lost their crops and children’s schooling was disrupted. The lives of many individuals were affected and today the LFCT would like to share the story of one person they have been asked to help.

Syed Mohammed Rizvi has appealed to the LFCT for microfinance assistance after his business was completely destroyed. Before the floods he was running a computer servicing shop and internet café. He had a 3 in 1 photocopier (printer, copier, scanner), eight computers and one inverter. The business was running very smoothly. Unfortunately, the floods hit his business and all of his computers, photocopier and inverter were submerged in flood water for around one week, despite Syed trying his best to retrieve them and save them. Syed has been unemployed ever since and is devastated. He has lost his entire business and livelihood.

Syed became desperate. There was no way he could afford to start his business again and so he came across the LFCT and appealed for help. With some cash injection, Syed can once again start providing for his family and running his modest business. Syed is prepared to work hard to get his business back on track and is extremely grateful that the LFCT have seen merit in his cause. He has requested $5,000 over the next five years.

Thank you.

4th
Jan
2016

Newsletter December 2015 Safar – Rabi’ al-awwal 1437 A.H.


Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­

Dear Supporters – Salaamun Alaikum

Wishing you all a happy and healthy 2016.

Thank you so much for your continued support of the Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust. You have helped us to touch so many people’s lives and to help them with a hand up. We look to the future to the challenges that 2016 will bring and are ever grateful for your support and dedication towards some of the world’s most vulnerable communities.

APPEAL: Ophthalmology Department, Karbala – Transforming darkness into light

In 2015, the LFCT committed to transforming the lives of thousands in Karbala. That commitment continues until the goal of a fully finished Ophthalmology Department is realised.

How many amazing sights do you witness every day?

A person forced to imagine the beauty of nature; a parent that can’t watch their child blossom into adulthood; a child that cannot see the comfort of a mother’s embrace – these are all unfortunate realities of many people living in the Middle East. Unlike many other epidemics such as cancer or HIV/AIDS, where the cure is difficult to discover, over 80% of blindness is preventable. This equates to a staggering 800 million people that suffer unnecessarily.

Staggering rising rates of blindness have had a shock effect on the economy – gross domestic product has dwindled as blindness has an indirect relationship with financial stability. When a person is struck with a debilitating disease that results in blindness in the Middle East, that person then loses his/her opportunity to support their family. A domino effect then begins to play out as that person is forced into poverty and thus cannot contribute to the economy through buying and selling goods as he/she could’ve prior to the disease.

It might also shock you to read that the majority of people living with blindness are women, most blind people need someone to care for them, and this is usually a child, more often than not.

APPEAL: Iraq’s Orphans – Growing up without a father

image 1Karar and Abrar are helped by the LFCT’s Orphan support programme but there are many more Orphans in need today

The LFCT’s orphan support programme is helping many families across Iraq, however estimates place orphans in the millions. One story we are sharing this December is that of little Karar and Abrar Muhammed Bachai who are aged six and five years old live in the Alhussainya area of Kerbala. Karar is in the first class of primary school whilst Abrar is in Kinder garden.

In 2010 their father passed away from drowning when Karar was just a baby and Abrar was still waiting to be born. Their father was selflessly attempting to save the life of another person, a little boy, the son of his neighbour, who had gone for one of his usual swims in the nearby river and had been caught in some deep water. Unfortunately, both ended up losing their lives in a double tragedy.

The children are Saddah whilst the siblings’ mother, Lamyaa Muhammed is non Saddah (Aamiaa). Lamyaa is living with her extended family who are assisting her with her needs, whilst she is also being supported as part of the LFCT’s orphan support programme.

Karar suffers with a speech impediment. He struggles with his pronunciation and could not get along in a mainstream school. The school tried to work with him but had to refuse him, suggesting he go to a school that could deal with his additional needs. Instead, with the help of LFCT’s partner, Karar was able to join the school, after Sister Israa enabled Lamyaa to meet with the management of the school and follow up on Karar’s registration case which is in hand.

Karar and Abrar are growing up without their father, a man who selflessly put his life on the line in order to try and save an innocent little boy. With the support of the LFCT, Lamyaa is able to provide for her children’s food, education and living costs bringing a little respite by knowing that her children will be able to go to school until they are able to leave and become self-sufficient.

It costs just £30 to support an orphan for a whole month – that is just £1 per day. Please support the LFCT’s flagship programme today and provide an orphan with all the support they need to get a great start in life. Thank you.

So as for the orphan don’t oppress him” Surah ad-Dhuhaa, verse 9

ARE YOU DOING SOME SHOPPING IN THE JANUARY SALES? SAVE MONEY FOR YOURSELF WHILST DONATING FOR FREE TO THE LFCT! Have you signed up yet to raise money for the LFCT for FREE? A new way to help support the LFCT’s work! Raise money for The Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust whilst you shop – with no extra cost for you!

Get started today!

Give as you Live is a shopping and price comparison website with a heart. You can shop for products from thousands of leading online retailers; use our price comparison tool to ensure you get the best price and even save money by using the exclusive offers and deals available on our site.

Don’t forget, a percentage of every purchase you make will be donated to charity.

So far Give as You Live has helped raise £6,438,377.76 for 7,500 charities

 Isn’t it time some of that also went to the LFCT?

Sign up today for FREE and you can raise some funds to go towards projects with some of the worlds neediest communities.

Visit https://www.giveasyoulive.com/causes#/ to sign up in just a few minutes. Follow the instructions online to learn more – we recommend installing the shopping bar which means you don’t even have to remember to visit the give as you live website to raise money.

Just think that you could be raising money whilst doing your weekly food shop, buying Birthday or celebration gifts or even holidays. Please take a look today –5 minutes of your time to sign up could help to raise vital funds towards education projects, providing clean water and sanitation or helping a cataract patient today. Thank you. 

LFCT in Kashmir, India: From living under open sky, cold and unprotected to living within four walls and a roof. Safety, security and dignity restored for two Kashmir flood victim families

image 3Kashmir suffered a huge loss in damages of over Rs.1,00,000 Crore (One Trillion) to infrastructure and business in the devastating floods that hit the region in September 2014. The flood is described as the worst in a century by experts and affected 2,600 villages and Srinagar City, summer Capital of J & K State. Over 475 villages were fully submerged and 2,125 partially. This resulted in colossal damage to housing and the business sector. Partnering with IFAWK in their continuous efforts to rebuild the homes of for flood affected people of Kashmir valley two houses out of 135 in total were sponsored by the LFCT. The process of re-construction for these two houses was initiated in the month of April 2015 and completed in July 2015.

Expenditure for House No. 1 = Rs. 2,96,174

Expenditure for House No. 2 = Rs. 3,37,141 Total = RS 633,315.00 / £6,333.00

LFCT partner, Idara Falah Aam, Kashmir (IFAWK) worked through its outsource vender (M/S Tawakkal Enterprise (the civil works contract company). M/S Tawakkal enterprises was shortlisted through a process of tender and chosen for the lowest rates.

One beneficiary by the name of Mr. Barkat Ali Bala, who has a family of six members, had a house which fully collapsed in the floods. They were compelled to live under open sky and after a few weeks managed to get a tent from another organization. His mother, who is an elderly lady was also living in the open. Here she developed some respiratory problems due to the cold dusty conditions. His two children always used to question him about why they were living in the tent and under the open sky, asking when they would get back their home. Tears used to roll down from his eyes on hearing such questions, which had no answer at the time. Mr. Barkat, who earned his living as labourer, had a monthly income no more than Rs.3500 which was not enough to meet even basic needs and in such circumstances he was not even daring to dream of reconstructing his house. The tent in which he was living was accepted by him as destiny. Among this all pain came a hope from the LFCT via their house rehabilitation project. His happiness and joy was beyond explaining as we offered him services to construct his damaged house. Only duas and words of blessing for the sponsors came out of his tongue. When I visited, his children caught hold of my trousers and asked me whether it was true that they will get to live in a house again and as I affirmed, they jumped with joy which was a sight to see and beyond the limit of words to explain! His old parents prayed for jannah and tremendous rewards for the sponsors who gave a new roof to the family compelled to stay in the open. 

LFCT Partner project wins Pfizer volunteering prize: LFCT Partner project co-winners of the 2015 VOL.UNTEERZ Challenge, a five-week global competition designed to recognize achievements in volunteerism by individual Pfizer colleagues around the world

image 4 image 5 image 6The project in question is the ‘Access to clean, drinking water to prevent diarrhea, polio, typhoid and hepatitis, in Asghar Naqvi, Pakistan.

A total of 104 volunteer projects were submitted from colleagues in 28 countries, and more than 12,000 votes were cast via the VOL.UNTEERZ Challenge website. The 25 efforts with the most votes then were reviewed by a global panel of judges, who selected the 10 finalists. Of the 10, one grand prize winner was selected. The partner organisation won a prize of $5,000. The grand prize winner’s organization will be awarded an additional $5,000.

LFCT in Pakistan: Following in the footsteps of success, new course in air conditioning to start in Pakistan

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A second A/C and fridge repair course starts in Pakistan following success of the first. 

A/C and fridge repair is a growing industry in the country and abroad. From the statements it is clear what a positive impact this course has had. It has the potential to have a huge impact on the lives of the young men, making them economically independent and able to sustainably support their families. It is now hoped that multiple options will open up, including starting their own business or moving into waged employment for a repairs company.

Working with the LFCT’s local partner in Pakistan, this December 22 young men will receive two months training in air conditioning and fridge repair, this is as opposed to a three-month course in the first batch. Experience and learning from the previous course has shown that two months is sufficient for learning all the necessary skills needed. The course will again be run by an established technical institute that belongs to SOS Villages, a renowned NGO that specialised in Orphan Care.

Required amount for books and copies, hostel stay, food and cost of the tuition fees 206,400-10,340 = 196,060 = £1231.30

Taking an AC course will prove to be a vital lifeline for these young me and will support them well into their futures. It is a fantastic opportunity for them to become self-sufficient and a second chance to learn a much needed and valued skill in an expanding market across Pakistan and overseas. The opportunities are endless and by working hard, these young men can achieve a lot all through the LFCT providing a small hand up.

LFCT in Pakistan: Education Support Program for Syeda Mehak Zahra who wishes to complete her BS Biotechnology Degree

LFCT continues its support for Syeda Mehak Zahra to complete her BSC Biotechnology 

Syeda Mehak Zahra who is attending the final year  of a  four year degree program of Bachelors of Science in Biotechnology at the Gomal University, Dera Ismail Khan, in Pakistan’s Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province is receiving assistance to finish hher degree from the LFCT and local partnerThough from an impoverished background, Syeda Mehak Zahra hopes to become a qualified graduate and embark on a career where she will be able to take care of her financially challenged family.

Syeda Mehak Zahra belongs to family with a low income in District D. I. Khan Pakistan’s KPK province. Her father, Syed Shaukat Ali Zaidi, was badly injured in a terrorist attack and can no longer work. Later on, the family suffered another major tragedy when Syeda’s elder brother, Syed Alamdar Hussain died in a bomb blast in Dera Ismail Khan. This family now just depends on Syeda Mehak Zehra’s father’s pension which is PKR 6,000.00 per month approximately. This is just not enough for the family to meet their own expenses and also to afford Syed Mehak Zehra’s educational expenses.

In the meantime, Syeda Mehak Zahra has scored well in her latest examination. But because of her family’s financial challenges, she faces the risk of discontinuing her education. Faced with deep financial distress, Syeda Mehak Zahra needs financial support.

As before, local partner, the Madinatul Ilm charitable trust with the backing of lady Fatemah trust will regularly monitor the academic progress of this student and provide regular updates to donors. Remember, a timely intervention to support a single student will not only go a long way in changing lives for our coming generations but also help earn a special place for you in the eyes of Allah.

Family details

 

Name

Age (Years)

Status

Occupation

Syed Shaukat Ali Zaidi

58

Father

Retired

Narjis Bibi

53

Mother

Depenent

Syeda Mehak Zahra

23

Applicant

Student

 

Expense details

 

Tuition fee and transportation charges / annum

PKR 90,000.00

Remaining Years

None

Request for support for final year

PKR 90,000.00

US Dollars

$862.00

GB POUNDS

GBP 563.00

EURO

759.00

 

LFCT in Pakistan: Completed Water supply schemes in between October and November 2015

image 9 image 10 image 1110 new water schemes for the inhabitants of rural Paksitan. Villagers receive fresh and clean water at their doorsteps and are no longer forced to drink from insufficient and contaminated wells that often came with a perilous journey. Thank you to LFCT’s supporters for their continued donations towards clean water projects.

A couple of the pumps are detailed below:

Hand pump in Onro village, Islamkot, Tharpakar District. A small locality of 120 inhabitants over 15 households. The depth of the water here is 100 metres and there was no hand pump until the one recently installed by the LFCT, instead villagers used to collect water from a well, which is both dangerous and unsafe. Total cost = 70,000/£439.62.

Hand Pump in Seri-Gujrat village, Abbottabad District. This village comprises of 16 houses and has a population of 90 people. The villagers will make the bore and if water is struck then the LFCT will provide them with all accessories required for the installation of the hand pump. Total cost = 40,040/£251.46

Water supply scheme in Jandi Wali Chankot. This locality comprises of 10 houses. The villagers tried their best and spent about Rs. 200,000 to get a bore. Unfortunately, huge rocks underneath made all four of their efforts fail. The LFCT’s partner suggested that they could try to get water through pumping the water from a spring that is about 1000 feet below the mountains. The women and children from the village used to go down the steep hilly track to get water, which was both dangerous and tiring. This scheme proved successful. The LFCT provided them with two HP pumps, a water pipe, electric line and stabilizer for electricity to bring electric voltage up to 220 volts. In these far flung areas electric voltage is weak – up to only 150 volts. A movie of this scheme is available on the LFCT’s YouTube Channel and is highly recommended to watch to see the true extent of the perilous journey that was made. Total cost = 80,080/£502.92.

Thank you.

3rd
Feb
2016

Newsletter January 2016 Rabi’ al-awwal – Rabi’ al-akhar 437 A.H.


Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­

Dear Supporters – Salaamun Alaikum

Tickets now on sale!

newsletter 1

The Lady Fatemah Trust would like to invite you to our 2016 Gala Dinner.

This year’s event will be held in The Drum at Wembley on 7th May, in the shadow of the iconic Wembley Stadium.

We are delighted to announce that our Keynote Speaker will be the award winning journalist, Janine di Giovanni

Janine is the Middle East editor of Newsweek and contributing editor of Vanity Fair, she is one of Europe’s most respected and experienced reporters, with vast experience covering war and conflict. Her reporting has been called “established, accomplished brilliance” and she has been cited as “the finest foreign correspondent of our generation”.

Providing entertainment on the night will be star of the UK comedy circuit Prince Abdi, who will be performing one of his trademark upbeat and infectious sets. We will also be having a special appearance from Spoken Word Artist Senasino.

We would love to see you there on the night. To book your ticket please go to: http://buytickets.at/theladyfatemahcharitabletrust/44938

EVENT:

newsletter 2

King Ahlulbayt Islamic Society’s 13th Annual Charity Dinner will be on Wednesday 17th February, Tas Restaurant, Borough High Street, London, SE1 1XF. Tickets £32/£30 early bird. This fantastic event will see stand-up comedy by Shazia Mirza and Bilal Zafar and a recitation by Sayad Ali Al Hakeem. Let us have an evening with friends and family, a delicious three course meal and raise some funds for the LFCT! Contact rabab_18@hotmail.com or syeda.r.rizvi@kcl.ac.uk for more information or tickets.

ONGOING APPEAL: Ophthalmology Department, Karbala – Transforming darkness into light

In 2015, the LFCT committed to transforming the lives of thousands in Karbala. That commitment continues until the goal of a fully finished Ophthalmology Department is realised.

newsletter 1

A person forced to imagine the beauty of nature; a parent that can’t watch their child blossom into adulthood; a child that cannot see the comfort of a mothers embrace – these are all unfortunate realities of many people living in the Middle East. Unlike many other epidemics such as cancer or HIV/AIDS, where the cure is difficult to discover, over 80% of blindness is preventable. This equates to a staggering 800 million people that suffer unnecessarily.

Staggering rising rates of blindness have had a shock effect on the economy – gross domestic product has dwindled as blindness has an indirect relationship with financial stability. When a person is struck with a debilitating disease that results in blindness in the Middle East, that person then loses his/her opportunity to support their family. A domino effect then begins to play out as that person is forced into poverty and thus cannot contribute to the economy through buying and selling goods as he/she could’ve prior to the disease.

It might also shock you to read that the majority of people living with blindness are women, most blind people need someone to care for them, and this is usually a child, more often than not.

APPEAL: Iraq’s Orphans – This month’s story is one of growing up without a father

newsletter 4Ali Ammar, aged 11 and his sisters Fatima Ammar, aged 13 and Ramla Ammar, aged 14 live in Kerbala, Iraq. The children are orphans, living with their mother, Rabab Mizher, in Kerbala since 2006 when they were forced to migrate. The family are Shia but lived in a mixed residential area for Sunni’s and Shia in Baghdad. Tensions began to rise and the Shia community became targets, ostracized for their faith.

LFCT in Malawi: Final Project Report – Renovation of Plumbing System: Phase Three

image 2image 1The project objective was to renovate the ablution blocks and sluice rooms on the labour ward of Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, (QECH) Blantyre in order to reduce the risk of hospital based infections to new born babies with their mothers and thereby improve the care and dignity of the mothers and the guardians who care for them. The project is being carried out in four phases.

The proposed renovation works covered repairs to: the plumbing and sewage system; replacement of showers, toilets and fittings, re-painting of walls; replacement of floors where necessary to improve drainage, replacement of plumbing and drainage pipes and replacement of ceilings and repair to roof to two sets of ablution facilities and to two sluice rooms.

Completed renovations in the latest phase include:

External plumbing and sewage system; of Labour wards ablution blocks and sluice rooms: Clearing of blocked drains; replacement of water supply and drainage piping; placement of concrete slabs over (previously uncovered) manholes.

Labour ward ablution blocks: Painting of walls; replacement of broken ceiling boards; fixing of leaks; replacement of wooden doors with galvanised steel; replacement of water supply and drainage pipes; replacement of all showers, and replacement of all toilets with flush master systems to safe guard against theft; stripping of floors and replacement of concrete floors in showers and toilets to allow for better drainage of water.

Sluice Rooms: Repairs and cleaning to sluice machines; painting of walls; replacement of broken ceiling boards; fixing of leaks; replacement of water supply and drainage pipes; stripping of floors and replacement of concrete floors in both sluice rooms to allow for better drainage.

Due to the extreme poverty of Malawian patients, there is a tendency for them to use rags as toilet tissue and stones for washing themselves, rather than more formal flannels, soaps etc. These rags and stones then often end up being dropped, lost or disposed of poorly, resulting in frequent blockages and re-blockages of plumbing system. The hospital has been given funding by another partner for the purchase of toilet roll for the labour ward toilets to allow for greater sustainability of the work.

APPEAL: LFCT in Malawi PHASE Four Renovation of the ablution blocks at the Male Surgical Ward 5A and the Female Surgical Ward 5B as well as the sluice room at 5B

malawi 2malawi 3After the successful reporting on phase three we are appealing to LFCT donors for funding to finalise the project with phase four.

The work commenced on Monday 18th of January and will be completed Friday 5th of February.

The total proposed budget is MK7,454,800 (£7,497.275 at exchange rate 14/01/2016).

The before and after photographs of the renovations so far speak volumes. It is unspeakable to think that this is one of the main hospitals in Malawi and that patients have no option but to visit and stay in such facilities to cure illness. At such a vulnerable time in one’s life when hospitalisation is necessary, it is heart-breaking to think of the added stress and illness that may be caused by going to the place one hopes to cured at. This is a real possibility given the hospital’s current conditions. Years of overuse in poor facilities have led to such conditions and we call upon the LFCT’s generous supporters to donate to the final phase of this incredible renovation project. Thank you.

LFCT in Malawi: Installation of four water tanks at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre

newsletter 2 newsletter 3The project objective is to install four water tanks at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre to alleviate the water shortage problems when mains water is not available in order to reduce the risk of hospital based infections and thereby improve patient care and dignity.

The proposed works covers the installation of two 10,000 litre plastic water tanks (Jo-Jos) on 1.5 m high (ensuring gravity feed), reinforced stands in the area between the Male Medical ward and the Paediatric Wards. A third is to be installed between the Dental and Neonatal wards and a fourth for the hospital kitchen.

The project includes demolition, brickwork and the placement of reinforced concrete. Two water troughs and plumbing to a third is also required. These tanks will eventually be plumbed into the mains system so that they fill from the mains supply and then immediately supply the outside taps ensuring that the water inside is constantly renewed and does not become stagnant. During installation and before connection to the mains, the tanks will be filled by bowser so as to ensure they are full from the start and therefore not cause any break in the supply of water.

Once full, they will be connected to the mains and they will then form a large (10,000 litre) reservoir within the mains system to provide a supply for at least some time should the mains be cut off for any reason. In the event of longer water shortages, they can again be filled by bowsers that can shuttle between the Water Board and the hospital rather than having to sit on site until they are emptied. Bowsers will need to be equipped with a pump to fill the tanks but so as to provide a back-up solution, the hospital will also be equipped with a length of hose to run between the bowsers and the tanks, and a hand pump should the bowsers not have a pump or it not be operable. A similar 10,000 litre tank will be provided to the kitchen block but this tank will be plumbed straight into the kitchen block and not to outside taps.

To date, all the demolition, brickwork and reinforced concrete has been completed.  The troughs are near completion and plumbing to the area is in the process of completion. The re-inforced concrete needs a further two weeks to settle before the water tanks can be placed and filled. More updates to follow in future newsletters.

LFCT Medical Referral Program: 8,817 Patients treated as December 2015

And if anyone saved a life, it would be as if he saved the life of the whole people. Surah al-Ma’idah: Verse 52

51 patients were assisted with treatment costs in December 2015, raising the total to 8,817 patients between October 2005 and December 2015, including 2,366 children aged 18 years and under. In its Medical Referral Program, LFCT’s partner’s most important aim is to empower sick refugees to regain their health by offering financial assistance with treatment cost. Another aim, which is certainly just as important, is assistance to patients with debilitating, incurable diseases. This assistance helps improve quality of life and preserves the dignity of these patients and their families.

Two such patients are 10-year-old Hussein K al-S and 8-year-old Abu al-Fazl A. Both children have been born to refugee families in exile. Both children have birth defects leading to incontinence. Hussein suffers from bladder exstrophy and has undergone surgery twice without success. He is otherwise a completely healthy child and attends a mainstream school. Hussein’s father works as an agricultural labourer. His monthly income amounts to about 90 GBP for six family members, meaning that the family of six survives on less than a dollar/person/day and is thus in the UN’s abject poverty category.

Be they refugees or poor patients from Iraq, assistance from LFCT’s partner enables them to receive medical treatment, restoring health, relieving pain and preserving dignity.

Dear LFCT donors: Please, continue to donate to this project. This month, average treatment cost per patient amounted to 163 GBP while the MRP could only offer 66 GBP – less than half of the full cost – in assistance on averageLFCT’s partner’s beneficiaries hope for your generosity. Please, donate today and give the gift of health to a poor person!

LFCT in Iraq: Exciting new update. Microfinance for widows in Iraq – making a dignified living for themselves

20+ Widows and Poor Lebanese Ladies will uplift 900+ Poor Iraqi Widows.

newsletter 4The LFCT is delighted to share some exciting news about the future of its widow support programme in Iraq with the Trusts dedicated supporters. The LFCT has been supporting hundreds of widows in Iraq and it remains one of their biggest programmes. However, regardless of how vital it is, the Trust has always had some reservations about how sustainable such a programme could be and in the long term, has always promoted giving a helping hand rather than a hand out.

A lightbulb moment came for the Trust’s Chairman when talking with one of the Trust’s other projects in Lebanon. The project is a stitching workshop, providing training and a job placement for around 20 widows and poor women – a small social enterprise. When the workshop was in need of a new cohort of ‘stitchers’ and an experienced designer, the Trust wondered if they should look to alter the design of the product and where they should be sold. It was at this moment that the thought occurred to LFCT’s Chairman to see if there was anyway the project in Lebanon could become aligned to pulling the poor widows in Iraq out of poverty.

The idea arose that the workshop could create garments that would appeal to the market in Iraq and could then be sent to Iraq and sold by the widows to help them to generate an income. They would purchase the garments at cost price and keep any profit they made. A trial started with a small group of the widows. After a few months this trial did not receive the welcome the Trust had hoped for. The widows taking part exclaimed that it was very hard for them to undertake as they felt the culture in Iraq was very negative towards women being involved in employment or generating their own income. However, the Trust felt that with enough encouragement that the widows could work through this. The Trust made a bold move and informed this trial group of women that they were being given four months of notice, after which their widow income support payments would stop, however, they were not being abandoned – far from it. They were offered to procure the garments and start selling to generate an income. All of the women took up this offer.

As the project got underway, the quality of the garments and their beautiful designs were a huge success. It was reported that when the widows came to the LFCT’s partner office in Karbala to pick up their cartons of garments for the first time that most of the ladies had sold at least a few items each to the office staff before even leaving to start their selling! They were enthused and very excited to see the reception they would get when selling the garments in their communities.

The future of the programme is bright! At present, the cartons of garments are being transported free of charge by pilgrims as they travel from Lebanon to Iraq, but this does have an impact on the volume of garments that can come through. The LFCT hopes to partner with Iraq to cover the airline cost in the future to freight the items. The fabric, hand loomed scarves, shawls and dishtasha will be sourced predominantly from India.

The hope of the Trust is that all 900+ widows will be weaned off of the income support programme and start selling the garments to make their own incomes and become self-sustaining.

This new scheme to support widows in Iraq remains at the core of the Trust’s values but at the same time ensures a more sustainable model and empowers widows to make their own living with dignity. The impression the widows that are mothers will impart upon their children will be one of hard work and earned income, rather than the values of relying on handouts. Eventually the children too will learn the trade and not end up on the streets and or pushing suitcase hand carts.

The project is of course, still in need of vital funds whilst the widows switch over to microfinance and to support the workshop in Lebanon. We hope that you will agree that this is an exciting and innovative project that we look forward to bringing you more stories of progress about over the coming months.

LFCT in Iraq: Studying by solar light

Two project areas in AlHaies Village, AlDaraji District, AlSamawa City, Iraq have received a distribution on solar lights to make studying safer and more convenient for all. The distribution took place on 25th December 2015.

newsletter 5 newsletter 6 newsletter 7

The project set about to; Provide awareness about how to use the light in the two project areas; Provide awareness about how to take care of the mobile solar lights; Distribute the mobile solar lights to the families according to the policy of the LFCT in which each family is identified by their PDS card.

The village of AlHaies is large and sprawling, so much so that it is split into two ‘areas’ approximately 15km away from one another. Accordingly, the distribution project took place at two separate sites within the one village. From the initial study, 65 families were identified, however when returning to collect their PDS cards, just 44 families attended and bought their cards as requested as a condition of the project. The remaining families, 21 in total either did not attend or did not bring their PDS card. They are still eligible for the project but have been asked to bring their PDS card on another agreed date for a further solar light distribution. The LFCT’s local partner is keeping hold of the lights on their behalf until this date.

The benefit of solar lights are multifaceted. Around 50% of people, almost all in developing countries, rely on the burning of biomass; wood, dung etc., or coal to light their homes. These materials, when burnt on a traditional stove emit high levels of pollution, particularly when used inside the home, as they were with the families identified in Iraq. Children often studied by this light, as there simply was no alternative. As a result, children and women in particular are exposed to high levels of indoor air pollution every day.

The children and students in the village are now able to use solar lights to study by, instead of firelight or not studying at all. The students are happy to be able to study quietly by this safe and cheap source of light and can even go into a separate room if they have particular study to complete without disturbing the rest of the family. At the distribution the villagers were very happy and thanked the LFCT, exclaiming that the Trust helps even if the Government does not reach them. They thanked Mr Karim and the donors especially for supporting them and bringing them a safe and clean source of light.

Thank you.

29th
Feb
2016

Newsletter Rabi’ al-akhar – Jamada Awwal 1437 A.H.


Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem

Dear Supporters – Salaamun Alaikum     Tickets now on sale!

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    The Lady Fatemah Trust would like to invite you to our 2016 Gala Dinner.   EVENT: LFCT Gala Dinner – Keep the 7tMay free in your diaries. The LFCT Annual Gala Dinner is drawing closer, visit the website to buy your ticket today! This year’s event sees keynote speaker Janine Di Giovanni, Middle East Editor of Newsweek and contributing editor of Vanity Fair, she one of Europe’s most respected and experienced reporters, with vast experience covering war and conflict. The line up also welcomes Prince Abdu, British stand up comedian and actor, of Somalian origin, he has worked in Abdi has also done stand-up shows in Canada, the United States, Holland, Northern Ireland, Kenya and Turkey. He will be joined by Sana Al-Yemen, spoken word poet and activist. It is set to be a fantastic evening and will be held at the Drum in Wembley. Please join us for a night of entertainment, inspiration and fundraising   We would love to see you there on the night. To book your ticket please go to:  http://buytickets.at/theladyfatemahcharitabletrust/44938   ONGOING APPEAL: Ophthalmology Department, Karbala – Transforming darkness into light   I n 2 01 5, t he LFCT com m it ted t o tra nsform i ng t he li ves of tho usands in K ar bala. Tha t com m it m ent cont inu es u nti l th e g oal of a ful ly finis hed Oph th alm ol ogy D epar t m en t is realis ed. march 1 A person forced to imagine the beauty of nature; a parent that can’t watch their child blossom into adulthood; a child that cannot see the comfort of a mothers embrace – these are all unfortunate realities of many people living in the Middle East. Unlike many other epidemics such as cancer or HIV/AIDS, where the cure is difficult to discover, over 80% of blindness is preventable.  This equates to a staggering 800 million people that suffer unnecessarily.   Staggering rising rates of blindness have had a shock effect on the economy – gross domestic product has dwindled as blindness has an indirect relationship with financial stability. When a person is struck with a debilitating disease that results in blindness in the Middle East, that person then loses his/her opportunity to support their family. A domino effect then begins to play out as that person is forced into poverty and thus cannot contribute to the economy through buying and selling goods as he/she could’ve prior to the disease.   I t m ig ht also s hock y ou to read t hat th e m ajor it y of p eo ple livi ng w it h b lindn ess ar e w o m en, m ost bli nd peo ple n eed so m eon e to care for th em , and t his is usually a chi ld, m or e often than n ot.

APPEAL: LFCT Partners with Icon Lifesaver Icon Lifesaver and LFCT partner up to provide LIFESAVER bottles across LFCT partner communities, but we need your help to make the most of it!   For every tw o  LI FESA VER B ot tles tha t  t he LFCT pu rchases, an ot h er on e  w ill  be dona ted by  the m anufact urer . Read more about this great new partnership below!   march 2march 3     Each LIFESAVER Bottle will cost £120, just £0.02 per lire of clean, bacteria free water. For every two Bottles the LFCT are able to purchase, LIFESAVER will donate one further one to our communities. The bottle is capable of delivering up to 4,000 litres of clean water for individual use. The LIFESAVER Bottle holds up to 750ml at any one time. The LIFESAVER Bottle was designed to store and carry dirty water, once water is cleaned there is risk of recontamination. With the bottle, just filter water when you want to drink it. No need for bad tasting chemicals such as chlorine or chlorine dioxide.   The LFCT have identified Iraq, Ethiopia and Malawi amongst the communities it works with where clean, safe water is desperately needed. Here is a snapshot of the water epidemic in Ethiopia:   Ethiopia: If you live in Ethiopia, you are likely to die nearly 20 years earlier that you would in the UK, largely down to preventable disease, much of which, has a link to the availability of adequate safe water supplies.  In rural Ethiopia, women and children can walk for anything up to six hours in search of water. This water is collected from open, unprotected ponds, often shared with animals. This source of water is vulnerable to contamination as rain water washes waste from the surrounding area into the shallow pond. This water is collected and drunk by families, polluting their bodies with numerous bacteria and pathogens and causing a whole host of otherwise avoidable illness.   APPEAL: Iraq’s Orphans – Please keep this project alive and keep supporting, this is vital basic help to give Orphans in Iraq the best support in life. march 4 After suffering trauma and turmoil, without support it is likely the children would have had to drop out of school and help their mother find an income for the family, it simply would not have been viable to send the children to school. The LFCT is able to support this family, but there are many more like them in terrible situations, due to no fault of their own. It costs just £30 to support an orphan for a whole month – that is just £1 per day. Please support the LFCT’s flagship programme today and provide an orphan with all the support they need to get a great start in life. Thank you.   APPEAL: LFCT in Pemba: Five villages on the Pemba Islands, Tanzania need your help to store fresh, clean water   H ow far do y ou have to travel t o t he near est tap , can you guaran t ee i t w ill w ork ? Coul d yo u im a gine no t k now i ng w h en and if yo u w a ter su pply w ill be r unni ng? H ow w o uld yo u p lan for dri nk in g, coo k ing and bat hing ? march 5march 6 LFCT supporters, please donate to this project today and provide over 1,000 people with a vital water supply. Five villages on Shamiani Islan, Pemba still lack access to safe water; Mkwajuni, Chotara, Mji Mpya, Pitanazako  and  Kaskazini. These  villages  have  a population of 1,038. At present, water is fetched from wells, but these wells are old and insufficient and rising sea levels mean saline intrusion is a key problem. The wells are not deep enough and often dry up during drought – they are far from adequate. The villages do have access to tap water from a supply system that travel undersea from Kengeja. However, this tap system only operates once a

week, usually at night. As such, villagers are forced to travel to neighbouring villages to search for fresh water.  In Tanzania only 56% of the population have access to an improved water source.   A lack of clean water is just one of the basic necessities these villages are currently without access to. Without easy access to clean water, disease and illness are daily occurrences and as the burden for water collection lies with women, they are forced to travel great distances in search of a suitable water supply, reducing their ability to further the household income, farm, fish, undertake education or training. Furthermore, when pregnant or ill, the daily, extended journey for water becomes a further strain on women’s lives, health and dignity.   The villagers are appealing to the LFCT to help provide them with water storage tanks in order to collect and store piped water in a sanitary condition for use at all times of the day and night, not just when the tap is in operation. The villagers have agreed to help with manual labour involved in the project, in particular the collection and distribution of sand and stones. Having clean water will open up many economic opportunities for the villagers. Livelihoods include fishing, for which the island is famous, farming crops such as rice, coconuts, bananas, cloves and cassava and increasingly, the tourism sector, which is booming in nearby Zanzibar. LFCT supporters, please help support this vital project today and restore health and dignity to five villages for under £1 per head. Thank you. Budget: 30,996,700 Tanzanian Shilling/GBP £10125   LFCT  in  Lebanon:  Salima  Medical  Memorial  Education  Project Progress  Report  of Nursing  Care Vocational Students from South Lebanon march 7march 8 Imam Sadr Foundation (ISF) is a Non-for-Profit Community-Based Organisation located  in  Tyre,  South Lebanon, with multidisciplinary programs in the domains of Health & Development, Education & Vocational Learning, Training, and Orphans’ care. Since 1962, ISF founder Sayyed Mussa Sadr sowed the seeds of the Nursing Institute by encouraging women to seek for the   career of Nursing in order to serve their communities and to alleviate the sufferings of their human peers. South- Lebanon is a place of conflict and political instability of continuous Israeli threat, leading to an evolving need for medical and paramedical teams. Thus, the Nursing discipline is in a high demand (with a very high turn-over) on the region in general and in the healthcare sector in particular, all over Lebanon and especially in South Lebanon. Below is a story representing a nursing student (15 to 23 years) seeking LFCT support:   Fati m a (TS in Nursing Care), comes from a rural background in the casa of Tyre. Her family is composed of 9 members, with a mute father and a mother with speech disability. The only revenues of the family come from a small agricultural daily work, with no social security or any health insurance. Fatima – who has received psycho-social support to overcome all her familial problems – is the only hope for her family and without Lady Fatemah Charity Trust, she will not be able to realize her dreams of becoming a white angel holding the holy mission of n ursing to serve her family and her community who is in continuous need for her services and her humanitarian empathy.   LFCT offers educational appeals to 28 Nursing Care Vocational Students – all social cases with stories similar to Fatima – at the Nursing Institute of Imam Sadr Foundation (South-Lebanon), who will graduate and work in a high- demand market of health services all over Lebanon – mainly in general and specialized hospitals, medico-social centers, mental health clinics, geriatric houses, maternity care, nurseries, school dispensaries and others.   LFCT in Pakistan: 10 more goats distributed across Pakistan march 9march 10march 11   Adaptable and easy to maintain, goats can live for up to 18 years, bringing a wide range of benefits; milk, mutton, skin and hair can all be utilized by the family themselves, or sold on. Goats can survive perfectly well eating even low quality hardy trees and shrubs and in adverse conditions, and if necessary, can survive on very little food or water, much lower than cattle or sheep, within a 24-hour period. When the goats reproduce, the kids too can be sold on to bring in an economic return. It is widely understood that you can easily raise 10 goats in the space and costs required for just one cow. It is expected that the villagers will only continue to reap the benefits from their goats just as they have been so far, in the early stages of the project. As goats rapidly reproduce and can give birth to one or two kids per year, just one goat can turn into a small herd in a few years’ time. In turn, those new born kids themselves start reproducing in an additional years’ time.

Providing live goats and the expertise on how to rear them and use them for all they can provide a widow and her family, goats can help to make the widows the LFCT works with more resilient. The goat is not a quick fix or solution, but it can bring a widow and her children great security. Goat produce can be used to nourish the family or be sold to substitute the family income. This money could then be used to buy new tools to make further income to send a child to school so that they can gain an education and assist in drawing their family out of poverty. Giving goats is just the start. Be a part of this exciting programme today and provide a goat for a widow and her family, helping them to unlock a more positive outlook and a brighter, more prosperous future.   LFCT in Pakistan: Ali Muhammad’s story of his sight restored and his vision for his son’s educated future realised march  12   Ali Muhammad is a 53 year old man living in the small area of Peshawar city called Beron Yakatoot. This locality is under developed and lacks basic infrastructure. Ali works as a rickshaw driver and has always had a very positive outlook on life. Despite financial hardship he has never given up and is a strong believer in hard work and the power of education. He believes in himself and the integrity of his work. He lives on the bare minimum wage but dreams big. He works hard as a rickshaw driver to make ends meet and to fulfill his dream of educating his son – a privilege he never had.   His son is also a hard worker and following in his father’s attitude, tries to pitch in and helps by driving the rickshaw in the afternoons after college hours. He has the added burden of two daughters who are both of marriageable age and faces the added pressure of arranging their marriages. Of late Ali has been finding it harder and harder to work with his failing eyesight as driving requires excellent vision. His biggest concern was that his son would have to leave his education incomplete and earn for the family in case his vision weakens further. This filled him with fear.   Ali visited many Ophthalmology Clinics where he was diagnosed with a cataract but the cost of treatment each demanded for surgery was far out of his reach. Cataract is responsible for 51% of world blindness, which represents about 20 million people (WHO, 2010). Although cataracts can be surgically removed, in many countries barriers exist that prevent patients to access surgery. Cataract remains the leading cause of blindness. As people in the world live longer, the number of people with cataract is anticipated to grow. The operation is simple, but expensive for those on low incomes. The operation involves making a small incision, removing the clouded lens and then implanting a lens to act as a clear replacement. Studies show surgery is the most cost-effective solution but affordable access to surgery is a key problem. Ali’s son told him about LRBT Akora Khattak, a clinic the LFCT has partnered with, after he had heard about them from his friend in the college. Soon after, Ali arranged to visit LRBT Akora Khattak where he was examined and treated for his cataract.   After the success of the surgery Ali’s joy was beyond measure, he has gone back to his life and is fulfilling his dream of educating his son to the highest level. He no longer fears losing his eyesight and losing his source of income. “LRBT is the only institution I have seen in my life which provides free of cost treatment for poor patients. May the staffs and donors of LRBT have more success in life. I will now be able to live my life with dignity and fulfill my dream of educating my son”.   LFCT in Gaza, Palestine: Early intervention for deaf children final report march 13march 14march 15   Early intervention is critical to deaf and hard of hearing children to ensure that they acquire language and achieve age-appropriate communicative, cognitive, academic, social, and emotional development.   Over a period of twelve months (January – December, 2015), the project supported the much needed early intervention services for 96 deaf and hearing impaired children aged between 0 and 5 from all over the Gaza Strip. At first, the project was designed to target 70 deaf and hearing impaired children, the number of beneficiaries increased 30 children graduated from the program to join kindergartens.  
  1. Provision of home-based educational sessions for 96 families of deaf children aged between 0 and 5:

A total of 430 home-based sessions were carried out by qualified early interventionists for a total of 96 deaf children aged between 0 and 5, in the child’s natural environment. Individual plans were developed according the needs of each child and those of his/her mother and took into account the characteristics of the Palestinian community i.e. culture, nature of inter-family relationships, etc. The general purposes of these sessions were to help the family members include the deaf child as an interactive member of the family who shares in family decisions, concerns, and responsibilities and to develop cognitive, social, motor, and language skills in the home setting. Some of the topics that were discussed in the sessions were:
  • Auditory training and language development
  • Psychological support for families’ members
  • Sign language basics
  • Daily care and maintaining hearing aids
  • Ear medical problems and how to avoid these problems (prevention)
 
  1. Provision of mother-child centred educational sessions at ASDC:
This activity targeted a total of 96 deaf children and their mothers. The early intervention specialists conducted a total of 1620 sessions at ASDC which focused on the development of the learning, cognitive skills and the speech abilities of the deaf children through auditory and speech training. Children were introduced visually and orally to colours, shapes, foods, etc. Children improved their communication skills, increased their self-confidence and resolved their internal restrictions and shyness. Since the mother engagement in the children learning process is very important and could significantly help in its success, the mothers of deaf children participated in these sessions where they were directed to take a better care of their children and participate in the development of the social, cognitive, language skills and knowledge of their deaf children. The sessions took two forms, group and individual.  
  1. Social work services, home visits, and family counselling
A total of 50 home visits were carried out throughout the project period by the early intervention specialists and social workers. The purposes of the visits were to study the social situation of each deaf child enrolled in the project and his/her family, and to provide them with the required psychological or/and social support in order to build and maintain a healthy environment for the children. These visits also bolstered the connection between the early intervention team and the families.   Impact: The project activities contributed towards effective rehabilitation of deaf children which in turn enabled them to go further in their educational process. It was reported that 30 children graduated from the program to join kindergartens, 24 deaf children were enrolled in Atfaluna Kindergarten and other kindergarten for children with hearing disability, and 6 children were successfully enrolled in public kindergartens for hearing children as their speech and language skills have noticeably improved due to the auditory and speech training. The specialist noticed a great difference in the social behaviours of the deaf children since the children became more balanced, confident, brave and initiative. Families expressed their satisfaction as they felt the difference in the learning abilities and behaviour  of  their  children;  they  became  more  social  and  active  in  addition  to  the  significant  progress  in their cognitive, language and speech skills; they described that they are now more aware of the deafness issues and they can easily understand and react with the needs and problems of their deaf children.   The  mother  of  the  deaf  child  Abd  Alrahman  Abu  Mahadi,  5  years  old,  expressed: “It  was really disheartening when I learned that my child is deaf, it felt like the end of the world. However, once my child started receiving the early intervention services, and later on his enrolment in the kindergarten, hope filled my heart again. Now, I am assured that Abd Alrahman will have a decent chance to learn and make progress in life. I would like to express my sincere thankfulness to the Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust for their continuous support. May Allah reward their noble deeds.”   LFCT in Bangladesh: Report Update: Empowering Adolescents through education and vocational skills training Help to unlock the potential in Bangladesh’s youth today march 16march 17march 18   The LFCT in itially sup p ort ed th e capi tal cos ts of an ex cell en t p roj ect that em po w ers y oun g peo ple in B anglad esh to tak e con t rol of their ow n fut ures and help lift t hem selv es out of po ver ty in to s ust ainabl e incom e genera tin g activ ities. Th e pro ject has m ade s om e grea t achiev em en ts a nd has a t tract ed fu ndi ng for i ts activi ties t o con ti nue fro m oth er sources. Thank s t o th e LFCT a nd do nors for ena bli ng t hi s pro ject to get a gr eat star t !

Aim and objectives: To increase the level of education and awareness of 740 young girls and boys in the project area, empowering them and enhancing their capabilities through: (i) vocational training; (ii) life skills education; (iii) leadership and empowerment training; (iv) entrepreneurship training (v) mainstreaming into government schools and (vi) advocacy around key social issues.   Project Summary: This project will work with 740 adolescent girls and boys in Barguna District, Bangladesh, to increase their access to education, provide them with vocational training, life skills, leadership skills and business training. In addition, this project will work with girls, boys, their families and communities to equip them with the knowledge and tools to understand their rights, advocate for girl’s rights, be informed about gender discrimination, violence and child marriage and take action towards preventing this. The proposed project area is Barguna District situated in the southern part of Bangladesh. Barguna is a poor coastal area prone to natural disasters with the economy depending on agriculture and fishing. Recently DAM has constructed 4 Multi-purpose Community Resource Centres (MCRCs) in the disaster prone areas of Barguna District.  These are used as cyclone shelters when necessary but predominantly used for running vocational training courses. In implementing this proposed project DAM intends to use 2 MCRCs to provide institution based sustainable and employable livelihood skills training along with life skills education to adolescent girls and boys.   Vocational training can overcome many of these barriers and equip young people with the skills they need for the rest of their lives. You can make a difference today by donating to this project and help give a young person the start to their career that they so desperately want.   Achievements to date against targets:  
        Activities   Number    of beneficiaries targeted September 2015           – August 2016   Number        of beneficiaries September 2015    –    Feb 2016         Remarks
Vocational skills training   course  and life skills education (training on their rights, training on employment etc.)   Tailoring         and dressmaking     360       225  (209  girls; 16 boys)     60% adolescent girls       and 40% boys
Mobile         phone servicing   90   60 (60 boys)
  Training course on poultry rearing, cattle husbandry, vegetable gardening, bamboo and jute product making.     290   280  (119  girls; 161 boys)   Adolescents (needs based)
  Adolescent leadership course   60 40 (16 girls, 24 boys)       Adolescents (needs based)
  Adolescent small entrepreneurship training   60 120 (97 girls; 23 boys)
  Advocacy and social mobilisation training   40 61 (40 girls; 21 boys)
  Mainstream education   100 26 (15 girls; 11 boys)
        Awareness raising meeting at village level         77 meetings           On           track; currently reached       750 participants Adolescents, parents, guardians, community members, key stakeholders
    Awareness raising meeting at District level     8 meetings Key community leaders   and stakeholders

 
    Advocacy    and    networking    campaign workshop at District level       1 meeting   Key community leaders, local government and stakeholders
    Advocacy    and    networking    campaign workshop at Regional level       1 meeting Key community leaders, local government and stakeholders
    Advocacy    and    networking    campaign workshop at National level       1 meeting Key community leaders, government and stakeholders
  Key learnings so far:
  • Mainstreaming into education is difficult and remains a challenge. It is difficult to motivate parents when they need their children’s financial help is needed now, in the present, to cover their basic needs. Working more closely with parents to helps them to visualise the future will be very important moving forward. Using other parents as ‘good examples’ could also be bought in and tried.
  • Girls are not very inclined to do the leadership course but do want to do the entrepreneurship course which has some of the same elements. This target has been exceeded, and so the low numbers on the leadership course for girls is not a problem, but some more elements of the leadership course will be tailored for the entrepreneurship course.
  • It is better to have a target for the number of people the advocacy and awareness campaign aims to reach rather than events held – some events you will get 5 people, some you will get 50. This is a change we can implement in the rest of the programme and moving forward.
  Case Studies and comments from beneficiaries: “Ruma Akhter” is 17 years old. She lives in a remote village called Latabaria in the coastal district of Barguna in Bangladesh. Her father is Siddique Halder and he works as a carpenter. Her mother, Monowara Begum is a housewife. “Ruma” has three brothers and one sister. Her father’s monthly income is so insufficient that the family cannot fulfil even their most basic needs. “Ruma” passed her Secondary School examination in 2014 but she couldn’t admit herself in higher secondary education due to a desperate lack of monetary support that she required as admission fees in the college. Accordingly, she couldn’t continue her study. Ruma’s father decided to give her away in marriage to someone in the village. “Ruma” refused, then her father decided that Ruma needed to go to Dhaka, the capital city of Bangladesh for employment in Garment factory as he could no longer support her.  “Ruma” wanted to do something to help her desperate situation, but she couldn’t find the way. At that time she met “Papiya” who is a community development worker in  “Keorabunia Vocational Training Centre” run by  DAM. “Ruma” learned the information about the “Vocational Training Centre”. Papiya informed “Ruma” that she can learn a tailoring course free of charge. “Ruma” was delighted and instantly decided to participate in this training course. After that “Ruma” attended the tailoring course very sincerely and with high interest. After the successful completion of her training, Ruma was looking forward to a better future with the help of the Keorabunia Vocational Training Centre of Dhaka Ahsania Mission supported by DAM UK and LFCT. Unfortunately, again Ruma’s father forced her to go to Dhaka for better employment. “Ruma” wanted to stay in her village and to do something by applying her vocational skills. One day, “Ruma” sold a goat which she was rearing and purchased a sewing machine. Now “Ruma” earns BDT 5000 in an average per month and also she financially supports her family, all whilst staying with her family and working in a safe and secure environment rather than living in Dhaka away from all her friends and family. Now “Ruma” is earning now but still has a desire to continue higher education be admitted in the Open University. Since meeting Papiya, “Ruma” has not turned back. She has overcome her struggle life and become economically independent with a vital role for the development of her family and community. She is extremely grateful to Keorabunia Vocational Training Centre for their great support. Now “Ruma” is a young independent girl in her community and others look up to her as a fantastic example.   “I am so gra teful and now I can lo ok aft er m y ow n fut ure and be independent. I can tak e car e of m y fam ily    w i th ou t    leav ing    t hem    to    g o    t o    Dhak a.    Fo r    this,    I    cann ot    th ank    y ou eno ugh.”   Thank you.

   
30th
Mar
2016

Newsletter Jamadil Awwal – Jamadil Thani1437 A.H.


Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ Dear Supporters – Salaamun Alaikum Tickets now on sale! The Lady Fatemah Trust would like to invite you to our 2016 Gala Dinner. Newsletter1 EVENT: LFCT Gala Dinner – Keep the 7th May free in your diaries. The LFCT Annual Gala Dinner is drawing closer, visit the website to buy your ticket today! This year’s event sees keynote speaker Nicole Tung, a photojournalists who has covered the wars in Libya and Syria and has recently covered the refugee crisis for clients including The New York Times and Wall Street Journal. Her coverage of the wars in Libya and Syria shows the fighting at close range, and is so unflinching that her images can be uncomfortable to look at. But they are also remarkable for their narrative and raw emotion. The line-up also welcomes Prince Abdu, British stand-up comedian and actor, of Somalian origin, he has worked in Abdi has also done stand-up shows in Canada, the United States, Holland, Northern Ireland, Kenya and Turkey. He will be joined by Sana Al-Yemen, spoken word poet and activist. It is set to be a fantastic evening and will be held at the Drum in Wembley. Please join us for a night of entertainment, inspiration and fundraising   We would love to see you there on the night. To book your ticket please go to: http://buytickets.at/theladyfatemahcharitabletrust/44938 NEWS: Charity Checkout 2 LFCT will soon be using Charity Checkout as its online fundraising platform. It will be a seamless transition and so you do not need to do anything differently as donors but as we uphold transparency we wanted to share this with you. The website for donations might change slightly but hopefully you should find it very easy to use. We welcome any feedback once it is live.   NEWS: Partnership with Sleepyhead Pod for 0-36 month olds. Made with love in Sweden! March newsletter1 15 AED (approx 4 USD) will be generously donated from the sale of every Sleepyhead pod sold from the Sleepyhead pod website and wholesale. Please share this with your friends and family to help generate vital funds for LFCT. Watch a video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQxql9OoMak Visit http://sleepyheadgcc.com/ for more information. ONGOING APPEAL: Ophthalmology Department, Karbala – Transforming darkness into light 4 In 2015, the LFCT committed to transforming the lives of thousands in Karbala. That commitment continues until the goal of a fully finished Ophthalmology Department is realised.   A person forced to imagine the beauty of nature; a parent that can’t watch their child blossom into adulthood; a child that cannot see the comfort of a mothers embrace – these are all unfortunate realities of many people living in the Middle East. Unlike many other epidemics such as cancer or HIV/AIDS, where the cure is difficult to discover, over 80% of blindness is preventable. This equates to a staggering 800 million people that suffer unnecessarily.   Staggering rising rates of blindness have had a shock effect on the economy – gross domestic product has dwindled as blindness has an indirect relationship with financial stability. When a person is struck with a debilitating disease that results in blindness in the Middle East, that person then loses his/her opportunity to support their family. A domino effect then begins to play out as that person is forced into poverty and thus cannot contribute to the economy through buying and selling goods as he/she could’ve prior to the disease.   It might also shock you to read that the majority of people living with blindness are women, most blind people need someone to care for them, and this is usually a child, more often than not. APPEAL: LFCT Partners with Icon Lifesaver 5 Icon Lifesaver and LFCT partner up to provide LIFESAVER bottles across LFCT partner communities, but we need your help to make the most of it!   For every two LIFESAVER Bottles that the LFCT purchases, another one will be donated by the manufacturer. Read more about this great new partnership below!   Each LIFESAVER Bottle will cost £120, just £0.02 per lire of clean, bacteria free water. For every two Bottles the LFCT are able to purchase, LIFESAVER will donate one further one to our communities. The bottle is capable of delivering up to 4,000 litres of clean water for individual use. The LIFESAVER Bottle holds up to 750ml at any one time. The LIFESAVER Bottle was designed to store and carry dirty water, once water is cleaned there is risk of recontamination. With the bottle, just filter water when you want to drink it. No need for bad tasting chemicals such as chlorine or chlorine dioxide.   The LFCT have identified Iraq, Ethiopia and Malawi amongst the communities it works with where clean, safe water is desperately needed.   LFCT in Lebanon: Update on Micro-finance – 300 widows participating in Micro-Finance, lifting themselves out of poverty   Objective: To make the widows self-dependent and confident in their own abilities, equipping them with the skills for a sustainable livelihood and to provide a positive role model for their children. 6 7 The number of the widows that are included in the sponsorship fund are 325 Sada and 134 Non Sada. From this total, 300 until now are participating with the Micro-Finance project with registration still ongoing. Most of the widows are very happy in this work as they are already reaping the benefits. The number of the garments which have been sold by the widows totals approximately 2,854 pieces of clothing. The acceptance of selling clothes is increasing day by day and the widows have a great willingness for continuing to participate with the project, even adding their own notes or suggestions for the garments (which one is workable for them and which one they are finding is most needed).   When the project first began, we found the widows were shy and afraid that they couldn’t do anything by themselves, however the project has given them the courage to overcome on their doubts.   The mechanism of Micro-Finance project: There are two ways of working in the project:
  • Widow Sell: – This way is dealing with the widows who are participating through the Sponsorship Fund project. Through this mechanism, the widow get more information about the project and how to sell the clothes in a way which they can save their dignity and cover their daily needs. The widows come to the micro-finance room and select the garments that they feel it are a good fit for their prospective customers. The participating widows check their capability to pay at the time that they come to select the garments or pay the following month when they come again to receive the sponsorship fund. For the first month there were about 80 widows who sold their items very quickly and came back after just 5-10 days asking to take another group of clothes! These widows are accounted as the most ‘active widows’ in the project.
 
  • Direct sell: As the micro-finance room is merging with the DRF and Imam Jafar AlSadiq School, so many of the teachers and others from the employs are also buying for themselves and their friends/relatives. Until today the participants from the direct sell are around 50 persons.
  Challenges: Two challenges have occurred and DRF have passed through them successfully. The main challenge that we faced through the previous period was the delay of sending the garments, facing an obstacle from the customs office, however now this issue has been resolved and we are sending the garments on regular basis dates. The second challenge that we faced was at the beginning of the project where we found the widows were largely unwilling to participate with the project. Now most of them have changed their point of views, as we have made them fully aware of the work and we are encouraging them step by step.   APPEAL: Iraq’s Orphans – Please keep this project alive and keep supporting, this is vital basic help to give Orphans in Iraq the best support in life. 8 Hawraa and Abbas mourn their father and worry about their future – but you could help the LFCT change that. Hawraa, 11 and her brother, Abbas, aged 9 are orphans who are living in Kerbala with their mother and their grandfather; they lost their father just four months ago. They are so sad because of losing their father.   Their father was born in Kerbala in 1971. He was working with popular mobilization (AlHashid Al-Shaabi) in Anbar and after he returned back from the battle for some days of rest, he had a heart attack. His family transferred him to hospital but unfortunately he died there.   The widow is also sad for losing her husband and now the responsibility has become much greater on her. The widow’s family have assisted their daughter through the past months but this will not continue for much longer as they themselves are poor.   Hawraa and Abbas orphans are attending school regularly; Hawraa in the 5th class in the primary school and Abbas in the 3rd class primary school. Both of them are doing well in their studying. By enrolling on the LFCT orphan support programme they are much more likely to stay in education and have a brighter future. They will not have to support their mother by becoming working children.   Without support it is likely the children would have had to drop out of school and help their mother find an income for the family, it simply would not have been viable to send the children to school. The LFCT is able to support this family, but there are many more like them in terrible situations, due to no fault of their own. It costs just £30 to support an orphan for a whole month – that is just £1 per day. Please support the LFCT’s flagship programme today and provide an orphan with all the support they need to get a great start in life. LFCT in Pemba: Water pump brings water and health to over 9,000 people in rural Pemba, Tanzania 9 10 Kwasanani and Anjaani, whose population stand at 560 families (9,015 individuals) suffered from a lack of clean water. Collection of water was from far and wide and prevented the villagers from productively using their time in production, farming and tending to their flocks. Their already poor status was thus made worse, with no sufficient time for these essential chores. Over a period of time, this problem persisted and with the number of villagers increasing, they decided to seek ways to solve this problem of their lacking of such a basic necessity. As such, a well was dug through their own efforts, and coupled with assistance from LFCT, they constructed towers to hold tanks of ten thousand litres each. This project was completed on 16th May 2015. The rural area this well was serving was considerable in size and the few canals that were dug to offer water from the well, could simply not keep up with the demand.   Having successfully completed all construction, to fix this problem, PEDEO, LFCT’s local partner, one horsepower motor was installed to bring water to the villagers at the levels required. This pump worked successfully from 19th May 2015 to 25th December 2015 before it burnt out due to excessive load. It was completely destroyed and thus deprived the residents once again of clean and safe water close to their homes. It was then that LFCT was requested to assist with a three horse power motor to cater for the required load.   LFCT approved this project, provided the funds, and today the residence of all three villages enjoy clean and safe water, at their door step. TOTAL Expenses: £958.90. LFCT in Pakistan: Nutritious lunches all round, thank you LFCT donors for bringing health and quelling hunger Goal: To provide a free hygienically prepared and nutritionally balanced lunch to the entire nursery and primary section with almost 235 students. 11 12 Ali Model School is located in Korangi, a slum area of Karachi where family earning is far below the poverty line with only one breadwinner per family of 8 – 10 people. The Ali Model School opened their nursery section in August, with 36 students. During the lunch break only a few children could bring their own lunches, the others had to simply sit and watch. The school could bear this no longer and begun to provide lunch to the entire nursery cohort. With the help of donors, the school started providing lunch to 36 students of the nursery. The menu was designed with the help of a nutritionist and a lady was hired to prepare the lunch. The students were very excited to have a balanced and nutritionally rich lunch and quell their hunger throughout the day, leaving them to enjoy their education. The parents were very thankful to Masoomeen Welfare Trust for this initiative.   With such a rich and healthy food to entire nursery, the Masoomeen Welfare Trust again identified another gap, this time with the students of primary age (up to class 2). Most of these came to school with inadequate lunches, their parents barely able to afford to provide them with food throughout the day. The Trust appealed to the donors of The Lady Fâtemah (a.s.) Charitable Trust to support them in the noble act of providing funds for lunches for the entire primary cohort on a monthly basis. Several new staff members were hired to create a support group for preparing the lunches for more than 200 students. From 1st October we started providing lunches to entire nursery and primary school students.   Impact: Students of Ali Model nursery and primary section are enthralled to get such lunch which is nutritionally balanced and hygienically prepared. This initiative also provided five job positions to prepare the lunches and set up. The programme also teaches the children about the principles of eating together in a disciplined way; the essence of togetherness and habits of good eating. Long term it is expected the children with have better health prospects, stay in school longer and have less incidences of disease.   The parents appreciate the initiative and thank with lot of Duas, from of their hearts.   LFCT in Pakistan: Javed Akhtar sees the colours of life with true clarity once more Dear LFCT Donors, Many more cataract patients are waiting for your donation. Thank you. 13 14 On the outskirts of Attock city, in the rural area of the District, lives a 55 year old man by the name of Javed Akhtar. Though old, Javed still works to sustain his family and himself. All his life he has worked hard but has never given up and dreams of a happy, secure future. He has been a farmer for the last 15 years and has lived a simple, happy, ordinary life. He has two young daughters and a son. His son is the eldest of his children and has to work hard with his father and mother in the fields. Unfortunately, Javed doesn’t own land and is hardly able to fulfil his family’s daily needs. This tense financial situation made him diabetic and this in turn cause cataracts in his eyes. He had spent a good few years with his illness but over the last few years, it started affecting his only source of income.   He visited different Ophthalmology Clinics but the outcome of his visits were the same – the cost of the procedure was far beyond his reach. Hopeless about his treatment, Javed had almost given up when he heard a vegetable vendor mention LRBT Akora Khattak. Javed couldn’t believe his treatment would be possible at a low cost, let alone for free! A few days later, he visited LRBT Akora Khattak, where he was examined in detail. All tests, including fundus examination by experienced doctors, were undertaken and he underwent successful surgery.   Post-surgery, Javed can now see the colours of life better than before and wants to have his left eye operated too. He has started working and living like he used to before the cataract. He is looking forward to providing his family a good and happy life now that he is able to work harder for them.   As he was leaving LRBT Akora Khattak with a smile on his face, he said, “I have seen many many colours of life, but coming to LRBT Akora Khattak was the best experience of my whole life. My family will be always thankful to LRBT, May Allah make it much more successful in it’s mission and complete it’s vision”. LFCT Healthcare: Medical Referral Program – 8,922 Patients have been funded for treated either fully and or partially 60 patients were assisted with treatment cost in February 2016, raising the total to 8,922 patients between October 2005 and February 2016, including 2,390 children aged 18 years and less.   Rich and poor people alike dread disease. Pain and suffering, or witnessing the pain and suffering of a loved one, are difficult and distressing for all human beings. Patients in poorer countries where insurance coverage is patchy, however, have to cope with the additional difficulty of the high cost of medical treatment.   When a child is afflicted with appendicitis in a developed country, help is only a phone call away. An ambulance will come and carry the patient to hospital, where surgery is performed at no or minimal cost. In less developed countries without universal insurance coverage, this same condition can spell serious financial problems for the patient’s family. Nine-year-old Iraqi refugee Elham M is such a case. Elham’s father is jobless. Her mother works as an agricultural labourer – employers tend to employ women because their wages are lower – and provides for the family. Her income amounts to about 100 GBP monthly and her family has seven members. This means that the family’s income is well below the international poverty line of $1.25/person/day. Elham’s surgery in a public hospital cost £235, more than two monthly salaries. The family was able to raise only £100. LFCT’s partner assisted with £120, which was paid right into the hospital’s bank account and little Elham could go home to her family.   Be they refugees or poor patients from Iraq, assistance from LFCT’s partner enables them to receive medical treatment, restoring health, relieving pain and preserving dignity. The table below summarizes the situation of the 60 patients who received assistance in February 2016:   Dear LFCT donors: Please, continue to donate to this project. This month, average treatment cost per patient amounted to 354 GBP while the MRP was able to offer 84 GBP on average in assistanceWhile this went a long way to empower sick refugees to make use of available treatment options, more is needed. LFCT’s partner’s beneficiaries hope for your generosity. Please, donate today and give the gift of health to a poor person!   LFCT in Pakistan: Update on successful trainees; SOS Technical Training Institute Rawalpindi, Refrigerator/AC course   A/C and fridge repair is a growing industry in the country and abroad. The LFCT supported 20 men to undertake a course in this discipline. The course had the potential to have a huge impact on the lives of the young men, making them economically independent and able to sustainably support their families. It was hoped that multiple options would open up, including starting their own business or moving into waged employment for a repairs company.    “Thank you for the training given to me. Now it is up to me to become expert in this field. I will try my best.”    “I thought it would be easy to get work but it I still very difficult. I am trying and hope to get it soon. Thank you giving me a start point.”    “I wanted to go to Middle Easter countries to earn for my family. This course will help me to get the visa. But before going I will get some more experience.”   Thank you.            
4th
May
2016

Newsletter Jamadil Thani – Rajab 1437 A.H. Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem


  Dear Supporters – Salaamun Alaikum   EVENT: LFCT Gala Dinner – Fast approaching and looking forward to seeing all of you there! We have a new addition to the line-up and are delighted to be joined by Chairperson Professor Malcolm Molyneux OBE of the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Blantyre, Malawi. Professor Molyneux is not only a world renowned Malaria specialist but also has an OBE for his services to medicine in Malawi. This year’s event sees keynote speaker Nicole Tung, a photojournalists who has covered the wars in Libya and Syria and has recently covered the refugee crisis for clients including The New York Times and Wall Street Journal. Her coverage of the wars in Libya and Syria shows the fighting at close range, and is so unflinching that her images can be uncomfortable to look at. But they are also remarkable for their narrative and raw emotion. The line-up also welcomes Prince Abdu, British stand-up comedian and actor, of Somalian origin, he has worked in Abdi has also done stand-up shows in Canada, the United States, Holland, Northern Ireland, Kenya and Turkey. He will be joined by Sana Al-Yemen, spoken word poet and activist. It is set to be a fantastic evening and will be held at the Drum in Wembley. Please join us for a night of entertainment, inspiration and fundraising   NEWS: SMS Donations For SMS giving, we now have a different feature that we call ‘Smart Text Giving’. When you text ‘Donate LFT’ to 88802 you will receive a text from us with a link to the payment page. You will then be able to make a donation but the amount selected will not automatically be deducted from your phone bill, instead you will still need to enter bank card details to be able to make a donation.   However you will then have that link ready on your phone for whenever you are ready to make a donation and donate either single or regular amount, of up to £5000. We welcome your feedback on the new service. NEWS: Partnership with Sleepyhead Pod for 0-36 month olds. Made with love in Sweden! 15 AED (approx 4 USD) will be generously donated from the sale of every Sleepyhead pod sold from the Sleepyhead pod website and wholesale. Please share this with your friends and family to help generate vital funds for LFCT. Watch a video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQxql9OoMak Visit sleepyheadgcc.com for more information.   ONGOING APPEAL: Ophthalmology Department, Karbala – Transforming darkness into light In 2015, the LFCT committed to transforming the lives of thousands in Karbala. That commitment continues until the goal of a fully finished Ophthalmology Department is realised.   A person forced to imagine the beauty of nature; a parent that can’t watch their child blossom into adulthood; a child that cannot see the comfort of a mothers embrace – these are all unfortunate realities of many people living in the Middle East. Unlike many other epidemics such as cancer or HIV/AIDS, where the cure is difficult to discover, over 80% of blindness is preventable. This equates to a staggering 800 million people that suffer unnecessarily.   Staggering rising rates of blindness have had a shock effect on the economy – gross domestic product has dwindled as blindness has an indirect relationship with financial stability. When a person is struck with a debilitating disease that results in blindness in the Middle East, that person then loses his/her opportunity to support their family. A domino effect then begins to play out as that person is forced into poverty and thus cannot contribute to the economy through buying and selling goods as he/she could’ve prior to the disease.   It might also shock you to read that the majority of people living with blindness are women, most blind people need someone to care for them, and this is usually a child, more often than not.   APPEAL: Iraq’s Orphans – Please keep this project alive and keep supporting, this is vital basic help to give Orphans in Iraq the best support in life. The LFCT’s Orphan support scheme, means that individual orphans receive just £30 per month which provides vital support for a more comfortable life where children can focus on getting their education and do not have to worry about where their next meal comes from. No one has been spared from the effects of violence and war in Iraq, and since 2003 the number of orphaned children in the country has escalated into a humanitarian crisis. Recognised as a conservative estimate, widespread surveys report this number to be between 800,000 to a million children (BBC, 2012), however many agencies and NGOs believe the reality to be much higher, at around three million. LFCT donors, please help to support this project today.   APPEAL: Education for Mohamed Banat from Palestine In the year 1948 (Nakba), all Palestinians from the West Bank of Palestine were forced out of their homeland by the Israeli Zionist regime and ever since have been living in refugee camps in Palestine, in all the neighbouring Arab countries and worldwide. Mr Mohamed Banat is from a Palestinian refugee family consisting of 10 people.  They depend heavily on donations from UNRWA for their living which gets distributed every three months and which consists of 25 kg of flour for three persons. Mohamed has been working as a teacher in a government schools which belong to the Palestinian National Authority in Palestine, but his salary is not enough for his family. He earns about 2300.00 NIS shekels and all of it is spent towards his MA studies. His father is 80 years old and is suffering from hypertension and diabetes. His older brother Ibrahim is mentally ill, has been suffering from epilepsy since his birth. His Uncle Ahmad has psychological problems and has to take a lot of medication. Another problem the family are facing is that another brother, Khaled is psychologically ill. He has four children and he too depends for his living on the donations from UNRWA. The cost of the expensive medication for both the uncle and the brother makes their financial situation extremely difficult. Mohamed is the only working member in the family. He is very interested in completing his PHD studies in order to pursue his ambition and to improve the financial situation of his family in the future. He has been granted admission in Universidad de Granada, in Spain. The monthly expenses are as follows: Dear LFT donors: €810.00 is a sum that many employees in the developed world earn in one or two days. For brother Mohamed, it represents his educational future for a whole year, and. the future of the Banat family. It will be he who will have to care for his father, uncle and brother and the children. Please, donate generously. Many more families and children in similar situations wait for assistance. LFCT in Malawi: The Renovation of the Plumbing System at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi ~ PHASE 5a: Renovation of the female ablution block on the TB ward. LFCT Donors. PLEASE Donate Generously towards this project. Project Objective: To renovate the female ablution block on the TB wards at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, (QECH) Blantyre in order to reduce the risk of hospital based infections to post female TB patients. As TB patients typically spend several months at Queens, the conditions of the toilet and shower facilities is particularly important as they are essential for better care and for the dignity of the patients and guardians who care for them. The proposed renovation works will cover repairs to: the plumbing and sewage system; replacement of showers, toilets and fittings, re-painting of walls; replacement of floors where necessary to improve drainage, replacement of plumbing and drainage pipes and replacement of ceilings and repair to roof. QECH is also the major clinical teaching site for Malawi’s only medical school, with over 100 medical students based at QECH each day during the academic year. The TB ward is used as a training place for the for the College of Medicine student doctors in Malawi. ChiraFund believes that the creation of a healthier, cleaner and more dignified environment for patients also creates a better learning environment for students.  These graduates are Malawi’s newest doctors and midwives – who will take their experience to district hospitals and health centres throughout the country. We also believe that if they learn their clinical practice in a positive, patient-supportive environment, they will translate this to wherever they work elsewhere in Malawi.  The importance of creating the conditions within which sick patients can be cared for in suitable and comfortable surroundings, as well as accommodating the guardians and families who assist with their care, has long been recognised. After several decades of heavy utilisation, the physical condition of the plumbing system has deteriorated to an unusable state with blocked sewage systems, broken and leaking pipes, unsuitable toilets, broken showers. The current sewage system is unable to cope with the high volume of patients and guardians currently using them. This has led to rats and other vermin taking residence near the wards. Project Work plan and Timeline-PHASE 5a: The proposed renovation works will cover repairs to: the plumbing and sewage system; replacement of showers, toilets and fittings, re-painting of walls; replacement of floors where necessary to improve drainage, replacement of plumbing and drainage pipes and replacement of ceilings and repair to roof of the female toilets at the TB ward. The work will commence on Monday 11h of April and will be completed Friday 22ndth of April. Project Budget The total proposed budget is MK 2,218,664.45 (£2,346.00 at exchange rate 06/04/2016) LFCT in Pakistan: 40 more patients have their sight restored in March 2016; tackling cataracts for the poorest in Pakistan This month, surgeries were performed on 35 Kashmiri and five other patients free of cost, removing their cataracts and restoring their sight and freedom. Cataracts are responsible for 51% of world blindness, which represents about 20 million people (WHO, 2010). Although cataracts can be surgically removed, in many countries barriers exist that prevent patients to access surgery. Cataract remains the leading cause of blindness. As people in the world live longer, the number of people with cataract is anticipated to grow. The operation is simple, but expensive for those on low incomes. The operation involves making a small incision, removing the clouded lens and then implanting a lens to act as a clear replacement. Studies show surgery is the most cost-effective solution but affordable access to surgery is a key problem. The LFCT has partnered with LRBT to provide these treatments free of cost to those on low incomes. This month we share the story of Noor Ul Malak. In the rural area of Attock District lives a 60-year-old man named Noor Ul Malak. Although getting older, he still works to earn his living and to keep himself healthy, busy and hopeful of a better future. His life is very similar to most others in his District. Having worked with his landlord for more than 45 years, he has to toil all day in the sun to earn his daily wage. All this hard work is required just to keep providing bread and butter for his family. He has three sons and three daughters. His eldest son is now old enough to start working, while the other two younger ones are school students. Due to all the stress, financial hardships and hard work, he is now a diabetic and recently developed cataract in his eyes. Noor visited several different Ophthalmology Clinics but the outcome of his visits were all the same – the cost of treatment was far beyond his reach. He had lost all hope about getting treated when someone told his son about LRBT Akora Khattak. Noor wasn’t sure that his treatment would be possible without any cost but after a few days, he visited LRBT Akora Khattak anyway where he was examined in detail and was given a surgery date. Noor was astounded how quickly the appointment date was decided and it soon came about resulting in a successful operation on his right eye. After the successful surgery of his right eye, he can now see the colours of life better than before and wants undergo surgery on his left eye too for full vision. Ecstatic, he has returned to his life with greater zeal is looking forward to providing his family with a good and happy life once more. LFCT in Ethiopia: Rural water supply project Ethiopia – completed February 2016. Thank you LFCT donors, “May Allah bless all those who are kind.” Project: Qaca peasant association was chosen as the project area due to its very low water coverage and poor sanitation and hygiene conditions, with people having no access to sanitation.  Objectives and activities: The overall objectives of the project were to:
  • Improve the health conditions of communities (particularly children) through the provision of safe and adequate water and the promotion of proper hygiene and sanitation practices.
  • Reduce the time needed to collect water and the burden this places on women and young girls by providing improved water supply sources at closer distances.
  • Build the capacity of communities to manage and maintain the water supply and sanitation facilities in a sustainable way and ensuring women’s role in decision-making.
To achieve these objectives, the main activities of the project included introducing sustainable technologies such as:
  • Water supply – protected spring developments, the construction of gravity water systems (GWS).
  • Sanitation and hygiene – hygiene and sanitation education.
  • Community development and gender – community capacity building and empowerment activities such as the organization of WASH user-committees and training to support the development of their ability to manage facilities.
Project impact: The project had a significant impact on the local community and brought a number of benefits:
  • Health improvements have been noticeable, with a reduction in the number of deaths and in sickness. This has saved the time and money previously spent on trips to health centers for spent for medical care and medication.
  • With water sources close by, women and children in particular have time to engage in more productive activities. It is estimated that the project has saved women an average of 3-4 hours for each round trip.
  • Water consumption, which was well below 3 litres a day, has almost increased to 30 litres as a result of the availability of cleaner water sources closer to home, enabling households to collect water as often as they like. This means households now collect water for purposes other than just drinking and cooking, such as washing utensils and clothes, personal care, cleaning latrines and for providing water for small animals. It is likely that water consumption will increase further with improved hygiene and sanitation practices.
  • The project has provided the communities with additional skills in masonry and water scheme maintenance giving them additional income generating skills for the future.
  • Knowledge of good water, sanitation and hygiene practices have increased significantly and begun to effect a real change in behaviour.
  • Hygiene awareness prior to the project was low as there had been virtually no large-scale water and sanitation coverage by NGOs in the targeted village area. This goes some way to explaining why the outcomes of the project exceeded initial plans, in addition to the fact that a significant number of activities.Moreover, well and water points have been generally located at higher and sloping sites, paved all around and drained allowing little chance for excess water to pollute wells or creating waterlogged conditions which encourage the spread of disease.
After clearly informing the beneficiaries that the sole owner of this project is The Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust, many beneficiaries voiced their feelings –   “My name is Sheek Muhaammed Abdullahi. I am the religious leader of this village. I am Imam of the mosque.  We had a water problem previously. We did not get water to accomplish our prayer. You know we pray five times a day as muslim but we did not get water to wash ourselves before praying. We even had problem of water to wash the dead bodies of our relatives before burying. KULLLU NAFSIN ZAAIQATUL MAWT and Insha Allah may Allah reward you Jannat for this of your clean water charity you made. May Allah bless these kind people who provided us with this clean water.”  “For those who do not know the problem, it seems easy. But it is not. We the residents of this village, elders, men, women, and youth including children suffered a lot due to shortage of water. How we as human being drank water with animals from the same source! We used to drink dirty water meaning our children became sick and could not attend the school. Today thanks to Allah and these people at LFCT we have got this water, clean water. Thank You.” Thank you.  
1st
Jun
2016

Newsletter Rajab ~ Shabban 1437 A.H. Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem


Dear Supporters – Salaamun Alaikum EVENT: LFCT Gala Dinner – What a great night we had, thank you so much to all of those who attended. We recently sent out a short online survey and it would be great if you fill them in and let us know your views about the event. I think those that attended will all agree that the entire event, from start to finish ran particularly smoothly, and for this a huge thank you to all of the volunteers for their hard work organising the event. Nicole Tung the Keynote speaker was inspirational and it was an honour for her to share her work with us, something particularly close to all of our hearts. A special thank you to the team at Icon Lifesaver for their impressive demonstration and extremely generous gift – a donation of a C2; a 750 litre at once water purification tank with Icon Lifesaver technology. This will make such a difference to some of the communities we support. We also extend thanks to Mr Molyneux and the video from the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Malawi, it was a wonderful illustration of our work. NEWS: SMS Donations For SMS giving, we now have a different feature that we call ‘Smart Text Giving’. When you text ‘Donate LFT’ to 88802 you will receive a text from us with a link to the payment page. You will then be able to make a donation but the amount selected will not automatically be deducted from your phone bill, instead you will still need to enter bank card details to be able to make a donation. However you will then have that link ready on your phone for whenever you are ready to make a donation and donate either single or regular amount, of up to £5000. We welcome your feedback on the new service.   NEWS: Partnership with Sleepyhead Pod for 0-36 month olds. Made with love in Sweden!   lft1 (2) 15 AED (approx 4 USD) will be generously donated from the sale of every Sleepyhead pod sold from the Sleepyhead pod website and wholesale. Please share this with your friends and family to help generate vital funds for LFCT. Watch a video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQxql9OoMak   Visit http://sleepyheadgcc.com/  for more information. URGENT APPEAL: Toddler needs all the support he can get after undergoing major brain surgery at just three years old.   Sayyid Ali Afdhal Mohamed Mezher Al-Yasiri is three and a half years old. He lives in Baghdad, Iraq with his two older brothers, mother and father. The family is currently in Lebanon, seeking emergency treatment in Lebanon. lft2   Ali was found to be suffering from Epilepticus with refractory to levetiracetam and valproate. Two stage emergency surgery was completed on Monday April 25th 2016. Ali underwent the first stage surgery with a 4X5 grid, 2X6 strip and 1X8 strip were placed to cover the suspicious lesion and 3 deep electrodes were inserted into the anterior, posterior and mesial aspects and intracranial recording and mapping were performed for three days. In addition, VBM (Volumetric Analysis) revealed abnormal signal in the junction, extension and thickness over the lesion. As all data were concordant, surgical resection was done on April 25, 2016 and intraoperative electrocorticography was completed alongside EEG recorded from all edges. In addition, intraoperative motor cortex mapping and white matter mapping were done in order to preserve the motor cortex and white matter tracts for the motor cortex. Post-operatively, he was admitted to Pediatric Intensive Care Unit for further management. This is an awful procedure for any human being, let along an innocent toddler. What makes this even more excruciating for the family is that they are poor and can ill afford this treatment, with the father a Sheik an the mother a full time housewife looking after three children. Of course the family had no choice but to go ahead with the procedure to save their little son, Ali. The total cost of the surgery was $33,000 USD. The family have sought a donation of $15,000 already but desperately seek the remaining $18,000/£12,400. Please LFCT donors, give all you can to help pay for this little boy’s treatment and wish him a speedy and full recovery so soon he will be playing and laughing again like any little toddler should. ONGOING APPEAL: Ophthalmology Department, Karbala – Transforming darkness into light In 2015, the LFCT committed to transforming the lives of thousands in Karbala. That commitment continues until the goal of a fully finished Ophthalmology Department is realised. lft3 A person forced to imagine the beauty of nature; a parent that can’t watch their child blossom into adulthood; a child that cannot see the comfort of a mothers embrace – these are all unfortunate realities of many people living in the Middle East. Unlike many other epidemics such as cancer or HIV/AIDS, where the cure is difficult to discover, over 80% of blindness is preventable. This equates to a staggering 800 million people that suffer unnecessarily. Staggering rising rates of blindness have had a shock effect on the economy – gross domestic product has dwindled as blindness has an indirect relationship with financial stability. When a person is struck with a debilitating disease that results in blindness in the Middle East, that person then loses his/her opportunity to support their family. A domino effect then begins to play out as that person is forced into poverty and thus cannot contribute to the economy through buying and selling goods as he/she could’ve prior to the disease. It might also shock you to read that the majority of people living with blindness are women, most blind people need someone to care for them, and this is usually a child, more often than not. APPEAL: Iraq’s Orphans – With your help, there is hope lft4 The LFCT’s Orphan support scheme, means that individual orphans receive just £30 per month which provides vital support for a more comfortable life where children can focus on getting their education and do not have to worry about where their next meal comes from. No one has been spared from the effects of violence and war in Iraq, and since 2003 the number of orphaned children in the country has escalated into a humanitarian crisis. Recognised as a conservative estimate, widespread surveys report this number to be between 800,000 to a million children (BBC, 2012), however many agencies and NGOs believe the reality to be much higher, at around three million. This is a typical story of such orphans. Mahdi, aged 11 and Radhi, 13 are orphans who live with their mother and two older brothers aged 16 and 18 in Kerbala, Iraq. The whole family totals 11 people, all of which are living in a house with just four small rooms. The orphans and their mother came to live with extended family when they needed support after their father passed away from a sudden heart attack. They got him to hospital but unfortunately, he could not be saved and died soon afterwards leaving the family devastated and shocked and worrying about what the future held.   The family struggled even when their father was alive. He worked as a daily labourer and tried his best to support his family so all of his children could finish their studies. Since passing away, the eldest son has had to abandon his schooling at grade six to support his family, he has become the breadwinner now, at just 18 years old and is a daily labourer just like his father was. This is a tough existence and the hard physical work is rewarded with little more than enough to get by, especially for a family with three other children.  LFCT donors, please help to support this project today. APPEAL: Sponsor a deaf student in Gaza today  LFT6 When you sponsor a deaf student, you help him/her to grow up in warmth, to receive quality education, and to be prepared for an independent life. Deaf student sponsorship provides you with the chance to witness the effect of your contribution on the life of the student forever. Your sponsorship will help a deaf student, female or male, aged between 5 and 17 years old enrolled in special education classes at Atfaluna School for Deaf Children. The student resides in one of the Gaza Strip’s marginalized areas and comes from extremely poor background. Your contribution will provide the deaf student with basic needs such as hearing aids, hearing aids batteries, healthy food, basic health care, school needs and supplies (school uniform, school bags, stationary, etc.) and school transportation. When you sponsor a deaf student you expect to receive:
  • A student profile describing the social, economic, and health statues of the student and his/her family
  • A receipt in the amount of your donation
  • A ‘Thank You’ letter from the student with translation, if required
  • A quarterly progress report describing the student academic performance and social and health statues.
LFCT in Lebanon: New incentive for widows microfinance project LFT7 LFT8 LFT9 337 Iraqi widows are actively taking part in the microfinance project, selling the goods created in the workshop in Lebanon. This month a new incentive was added, the idea is that a reward of $20 could be given to the top seller at the end of each month. This would act as an incentive and encourage positive competition between the women to increase their sales and reach the reward bonus themselves in the following months. And so the project tried it out! Sister Dalal Hilal had been the top seller one month; she felt happy and was positive would do all she could to continue to be the best for the coming month. Dalal’s photo had been hung on a board in the micro-finance room to be noted by all of the widows – celebrating her achievements. This cause a lot of talk of determination from the other widows selling garments and there is a lot of hard work going on to try and be the next month’s top seller! LFCT in Pakistan: 30 more goats distributed, bringing the total to 287 for the live goats project LFT10 LFT11 On the 16th April, 10 more goats were distribute, taking the latest total to 30 for poor widows in rural Pakistan.   One widow said that she had been anticipating goats for many months since she saw a widow in nearby village with four goats. “You had given her one and now she has four of them. This has helped her to feed her children and she will make money when she sells a male goat soon. I am thankful to those who have given me this goat and I will pray for them and their family’s wellbeing and prosperity. Jazak Allah.”    Adaptable and easy to maintain, goats can live for up to 18 years, bringing a wide range of benefits; milk, mutton, skin and hair can all be utilized by the family themselves, or sold on. Goats can survive perfectly well eating even low quality hardy trees and shrubs and in adverse conditions, and if necessary, can survive on very little food or water, much lower than cattle or sheep, within a 24 hour period. When the goats reproduce, the kids too can be sold on to bring in an economic return. It is widely understood that you can easily raise 10 goats in the space and costs required for just one cow. It is expected that the villagers will only continue to reap the benefits from their goats just as they have been so far, in the early stages of the project. As goats rapidly reproduce and can give birth to one or two kids per year, just one goat can turn into a small herd in a few years’ time. In turn, those new born kids themselves start reproducing in an additional years’ time. The goats are bringing many benefits already. Some of the farmers are selling the rich milk on that the goats are producing to supplement their income and some families are keeping it for themselves to drink, the rich milk full of nutrients for their children and to supplement their daily meals. Fertiliser also comes in the form of goat droppings, a nutritious manure that comes simply as a bi-product. The manure ensure crops grow tall and strong and full of vitamins. These can be used to sell, and get a good price at market or eaten by the family themselves. It is incredible to think that a goat can bring each of these even before it has reproduced its own kids for sale. Some of the goats have already reproduced and the families have young kids ready to sell at the market or keep to produce even more milk and products to sell. LFCT supporters, there are still many more deserving families in need of goats – a simple solution to the complex issues facing these marginalized families. LFCT in Pemba: Fresh water flows to over 9,000   LFT12 LFT13   This project was implemented in Kwasanani, Jombwe, Vijiji and Anjaani villages, Pemba. The total combined population of the villages is 9,015 residents, children, youths and adults included. Residents of these villages faced a serious problem of lack of basic services of water and sanitation, causing a great disturbance in their daily lives. Illness, particularly diarrhoea amongst young children was rife as the only source of water was contaminated and stagnant. The residents of these villages came to PEDEO’s office, begging them to find them a donor who could help them with their water project. They had already started the project themselves, including digging a well for water and constructing a tower but they had run out of funds to finalise the project and bring the water to all of the different villages from the newly constructed well. The villages are poor and most are subsistence farmers or fishers, they have very little spare income if any but were determined to get fresh water to their villages. Fortunately, LFCT could help with the whole project and started providing services from 16.05.2015.   The project with the LFCT was to help the villagers to create 22 walled water canals to allow water to flow from the constructed well to various different points in each village. The villagers could ill afford to cover the cost of the canals but wanted to complete the project having made the commitment by constructing the initial well and tower. Thanks to the LFCT and its generous supporters, the project was completed on 25.04.2016 and the canals have already begun to benefit the villagers, bringing water to their households and community points in a hygienic and safe manner.   Budget: In implementing this project, we used money from LFCT for the purchase of bricks, cement, gravel etc. We also used these funds for the transportation of equipment along with payment of workmen who built the canals. The use of funds is as it follows below:   The total supported by the LFCT was: £1,378.46. Residents of the villages thanked LFCT who supported this canal wall construction.   LFCT in Malawi: Final phase completed – renovation of female ablution block on the TB ward – what a transformation! The work will commenced on Monday 11h of April and will was completed Friday 22ndth of April.   The objective: To renovate the female ablution block on the TB wards at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, (QECH) Blantyre in order to reduce the risk of hospital based infections to post female TB patients. As TB patients typically spend several months at Queens, the conditions of the toilet and shower facilities is particularly important as they are essential for better care and for the dignity of the patients and guardians who care for them.   The proposed renovation work covered repairs to: the plumbing and sewage system; replacement of showers, toilets and fittings, re-painting of walls; replacement of floors where necessary to improve drainage, replacement of plumbing and drainage pipes and replacement of ceilings and repair to roof. Results: The work has been completed to a very high standard by our contractor, Mwanic Construction and with the constant supervision by ChiraFund’s Project Manager, George Musowa and Coordinator, Alice Taylor.   The renovations included: External plumbing and sewage system; of TB wards ablution blocks: Clearing of blocked drains; replacement of water supply and drainage piping; placement of concrete slabs over (previously uncovered) manholes.   TB ablution blocks: Painting of walls; replacement of broken ceiling boards; fixing of leaks; replacement of wooden doors with galvanised steel; replacement of water supply and drainage pipes; replacement of all showers, and replacement of all toilets with flush master systems to safe guard against theft.   Challenges: ChiraFund procured the services of a new contractor for phase 5a due to the continued high cost of Kamungu Construction. Phase 5a was a pilot phase to assess whether this contractor was able to deliver the same high quality at a cheaper price. ChiraFund checked each day that the materials were the same quality (Cobra South Africa) and that the quality of workmanship was of equal standard. On the whole we were very pleased with the work and have decided to continue with this contractor although he will need more direct supervision that Kamungu Construction. This is because he is young and enthusiastic but still requires some supervision.   Thank you.
28th
Jun
2016

Newsletter Shabban ~ Ramadhan 1437 A.H. Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem


Dear Supporters – Salaamun Alaikum NEWS: Dr Thuha TO climb Ben Nevis! On the 23rd of July  Dr Thuha Jabber will be embarking on one of the biggest challenges to date, climbing Ben Nevis, to help raise money for the destitute orphans and widows of Iraq. 1 Thuha would really appreciate your support, in whatever way it may come. Please spare a few moments to visit my just giving page to find out a little bit more about her Ben Nevis story. During this holy month, everything you do will be amplified so please be generous and dig deep. Thank you and may God bless you always! https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Thuha-Jabbar1985?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=fundraisingpage&utm_content=Thuha-Jabbar1985&utm_campaign=pfp-share NEWS: SMS Donations For SMS giving, we now have a different feature that we call ‘Smart Text Giving’. When you text ‘Donate LFT’ to 88802 you will receive a text from us with a link to the payment page. You will then be able to make a donation but the amount selected will not automatically be deducted from your phone bill, instead you will still need to enter bank card details to be able to make a donation. However you will then have that link ready on your phone for whenever you are ready to make a donation and donate either single or regular amount, of up to £5000. We welcome your feedback on the new service. NEWS: Partnership with Sleepyhead Pod for 0-36 month olds. Made with love in Sweden! 2 15 AED (approx 4 USD) will be generously donated from the sale of every Sleepyhead pod sold from the Sleepyhead pod website and wholesale. Please share this with your friends and family to help generate vital funds for LFCT. Watch a video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQxql9OoMak Visit http://sleepyheadgcc.com/ for more information.   ONGOING APPEAL: Ophthalmology Department, Karbala – Transforming darkness into light 3 4 In 2015, the LFCT committed to transforming the lives of thousands in Karbala. That commitment continues until the goal of a fully finished Ophthalmology Department is realised.   A person forced to imagine the beauty of nature; a parent that can’t watch their child blossom into adulthood; a child that cannot see the comfort of a mothers embrace – these are all unfortunate realities of many people living in the Middle East. Unlike many other epidemics such as cancer or HIV/AIDS, where the cure is difficult to discover, over 80% of blindness is preventable. This equates to a staggering 800 million people that suffer unnecessarily.   Staggering rising rates of blindness have had a shock effect on the economy – gross domestic product has dwindled as blindness has an indirect relationship with financial stability. When a person is struck with a debilitating disease that results in blindness in the Middle East, that person then loses his/her opportunity to support their family. A domino effect then begins to play out as that person is forced into poverty and thus cannot contribute to the economy through buying and selling goods as he/she could’ve prior to the disease.   It might also shock you to read that the majority of people living with blindness are women, most blind people need someone to care for them, and this is usually a child, more often than not.   APPEAL: Iraq’s Orphans – With your help, there is hope. Noor and Hiba share their story

1

Noor and Hiba are orphans aged 12 and nine years old. They have five other siblings and live with their mother in a small house in Kerbala. The house they rent only has two rooms where the whole family must live. Their monthly rental is 250,000.00 IDQ. Their mother is sick with rheumatism and she needs a weekly treatment for this chronic disease which causes her much pain and distress. Their father was working as a daily labourer, bringing in a small income to the family, but an income nonetheless which meant the family could live in dignity. One day the father became very fatigued and his blood sugar level spiked and sent him into a coma. He suddenly passed away despite the family trying to get him to a hospital. It was realised that he suffered from diabetes but did not realise it at the time. Noor and Hiba and just two of the estimated 800,000 children and rising that have lost at least one parent in Iraq. Iraq has not had stability in more than ten years and this sees no sign of abating, leaving even more children orphaned each day. 2013 was a particularly bad year in which the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq – UNAMI considered one of the bloodiest years in Iraq’s history. Yet it continues, over this weekend in June 2016 alone, 50 more innocent people have been killed or injured as a result of shootings and bombings in restaurants and market places.   Iraq struggles to cope with these sheer numbers of orphans. It is estimated that the country only has 200 social workers and psychiatrists put together, for a population of 30 million people. It has no child protection laws. Innocent children are the ones that suffer the most in Iraq’s ongoing violence. The repercussions can be felt everywhere, rippling out across society. Income generation and schooling is affected and yet with the LFCT’s joint programmes, both widows and orphans can be supported with the view that widows will become long term self-sufficient once their micro-finance business selling clothing begins to grow with their confidence and newly acquired skills. LFCT donors, please help to support this project today. EXCITING NEWS UPDATE: Expansion of the LFCT Micro Finance Project into a Girls School for Orphans. Selling garments and helping to feed the students – Full self-sustainability is on the horizon! Popularity of LFCT’s UNIQUE Micro Finance Project in Iraq is gaining momentum. Al-Salihat is a Secondary School where there are orphans; refugees and other local children from the Holy City of Karbala. The school is one of the best academic schools in Kerbala with good principals and staff. The school provides modern lessons to the students such as computer lessons, English Language and additional activities that enhance the academic studies including participating in handicrafts in regular exhibitions that happen in the school.   Al-Salihat Girls Academy has just this month won the first position in a girls scout parade held in the Karbala province in January 2016. Even though it is a relatively new school, Al-Salihat Academy has achieved great accomplishments in creating many opportunities for its students.   The school consists of 95 students, 73 of them are orphans, 22 are non-orphans, 10 are Sada and 85 are Non-Sada. The orphans are not paying any fees for the school. The school opens 6 days a week from 8am – 2pm, approximately 250 days a year, which, in comparison to the governmental schools is nearly 90 days more. The students spend all day in the school during which they pass through two mealtimes (breakfast and lunch). Up until now there has been a donor that has covered their daily lunch but unfortunately the donor has stopped supporting the school because of a lack of funding.   To raise these funds the school could will start a Garment Micro Finance Project, an outlet similar to the one in Lebanon/Iraq which has been running very successfully with widows. The more that is sold, the more income the school will get. In so doing, the school will no longer have to look for the donors and or depend upon donors. The Principal of the school is delighted and the shop has been established at the school. As soon as the school re-opens in September 2015 for the new school year, all the teachers will get involved in selling the garments which are stitched by Widows and Poor sisters from Lebanon.   LFCT in Iraq: LFCT’s representative in Karbala has successfully carried out cooking rice on solar Cooker 1 2 3 The aim now is to give the demonstration to widows, poor families, villagers in the Desert of Karbala how to use solar cooker thereby saving cost of cost or search of wood; health and environmentally friendly.   LFCT donors please start donating towards this another UNIQUE project of LFCT in Iraq. The cost is GB£ 25.00 per one solar cooker which will last for minimum three years if not four years.   LFCT in Bangladesh: ‘Sweet water’ for 600 households  1 An estimated 43,000 people die each year from arsenic-related illness in Bangladesh (Human Rights Watch, 2016) Primary objectives: Installation of a pump and filtering system to provide safe water to approximately 3,300 people/600 households living in an arsenic and saline contaminated village, Middle Moutola, in Moutola Union, Satkhira District, South West Bangladesh, thus improving their health and opportunities. At present, the villagers collect water from a hand pump (tube well) within the centre of the village, but this is arsenic contaminated, with very intermittent flow which is brackish. The hand pump is fine for use as water for clothes washing but is not fit for human consumption – still, at present it is the only source of ‘drinking’ water near to the village. Drinking this water, the village are silently poisoning themselves with arsenic and their children are suffering constant bouts of diarrhoea and stomach upset. The village itself is settled on the side of a main road, close to a local market, a primary school and secondary school all within 1km. The village has identified a site that has been generously donated by a land owner for use as the site for a plant. The village have spent some time drawing up maps of their village to indicate where the plant would be located in relation to the village and local area. The village itself stretched for 1.5km’s from the edge of the road. The villagers have also conducted a water users survey to ascertain who would use the plant if it were to be installed, where users currently fetch water from and how this impacts their daily life.   In 2002 the WHO recognized health impacts of consumption of highly saline waters as a priority for investigation under its public health initiatives (WHO 2003).   Expected Results
  • Safe arsenic and saline free drinking water for approximately 3,300 people (600 households) at an affordable cost that will be mutually agreed (the tariff will be set through discussions with the community). Charging a small amount for water means the plant can become self-sustaining;
  • Lower infant mortality; higher longevity among community generally;
  • Better health leading to increased ability to earn livelihoods, attend school, increase income and opportunities;
  • An earning opportunity for an entrepreneur within the community who will operate and maintain the system and make it sustainable for continuous supply of safe drinking water;
  • A model scheme that will encourage other communities to take up similar initiatives
  “It would really make the world of difference to us if we were to get fresh, safe, sweet water. This landowner is very fortunate that he can bare to give up the precious land for the benefit of the community. This is one less hurdle for us to get through. I have lived in this village my whole life and work as a teacher in the school close by. We would all benefit so much, the whole community, if we were to get this plant. I pray for our village to be healthy with sweet water to nourish us,” Humira, village resident.   LFCT in India: Microfinance project aims to bring relief – taxi vehicle to lift Sadaat Widow family out of poverty. 2 Shajar Imam is 25. He lives in New Delhi, India with his family. Shajar’s father passed away some years ago and he himself lost one leg during an accident. Despite these tragic circumstances Shajar’s mother has worked hard to provide him with an education and is now doing the same for his two sisters. They are currently studying 100km away in Bihar. Shajar’s mother is helping to look after her two sister and their children, they too are unfortunately, widows. Together they hope to support each other, but life is tough. Shajar is working at a study Centre, teaching children but is earing very little, just £200 per month. He is frequently ill as the family can barely afford food to keep them self well nourished. This is despite Shajar’s mother working so hard and spreading herself so thinly to support not only her disabled son, but her two daughter, he widowed sister and their children too. There is scarcely enough food to go round. Shajar’s mother has recently moved to Dubai for a cleaning job, she is hoping to send money back, but she has found herself in a difficult situation and misses her family greatly, but she was desperate to help her family survive. Shajar believes there is a way out of this miserable situation. He is appealing to the LFCT for funding for a car – a car he can use as a taxi and to earn a good wage to bring the family out of poverty. The family need a more stable income to support their extended family and something that is flexible and will work with them. A taxi is ideal for this. They could triple or even quadruple their income easily. The vehicle, all setup including insurance and tax will cost £7,344. Please, LFCT donors, help support this family that have had such a difficult past and a mother who goes to extreme lengths to ensure food on the table for her loved ones. UPDATE: Since the family have the hope of getting a more stable income, the mother has returned from Dubai and is once again reunited with her family. 3 APPEAL: Lebanese citizens and Syrians refugees alike struggling to source their nightly Iftar. LFCT donors, please provide a family in need with Iftar this evening   Ramadan is a month for spending time with family, knowing that through the fasting days you can have nightly Iftar with your loved ones. Unfortunately, for some families in Lebanon this Ramadan the fasting is made additionally challenging as there is great worry and uncertainty over where their nightly Iftar will come from. Instead of sharing sweets and buying Eid clothing, some families are knocking on the doors of different NGOs and collecting leftovers from restaurants for Iftar.    Five years of the crisis in Syria have had a huge impact in Lebanon as the country is now home to as many as 2 million Syrian refugees. There are 4 million Lebanese living in Lebanon, and with the added population of the Syrian refugees, this rapid percentage increase from the refugee population is a serious burden on Lebanon’s economy and Lebanon cannot afford to increase public debt. There is increasing pressure on services in Lebanon and it struggles to support its own inhabitants who live below the poverty line and the Syrian refugees who flee to the country with barely any possessions of their own, traumatized and homeless. In Lebanon this Ramadan both poor Lebanese families and Syrian refugees alike are struggling. Poor Lebanese are struggling as incomes have dropped but prices continue to increase and the country faces a recession. Syrian refugees have found huge cuts in their support. Both are struggling to feed their children and are unable to meet their needs. We would like to bring some relief this Ramadan to residents in Lebanon whether they be poor Lebanese families or Syrian refugees. We would like to provide:
  1. Ramadan Iftar food baskets, filling children’s starving bellies US$ 33.00 per basket
  2. Provide clothes as an Eid gift US$ 4.00 – US$ 8.00 per family member
This will lift the spirits of residents in Lebanon and boost morale. This Ramadan please reach into your pockets and provide what you can towards these struggling families in Lebanon. For the price of a sandwich you can provide an Eid gift of clothing and brighten up the recipient’s world. Thank you LFCT supporters. LFCT in Pakistan: A further ten water supply schemes desperately needed in Pakistan – please help provide a family with water starting Ramadan month  4 “The geography of Pakistan varies greatly, ranging from arid deserts to remote mountainous regions. This makes accessing safe water extremely difficult for the poorest people. 16 million people in Pakistan don’t have access to safe water,” (WaterAid, 2016)   Summary: It is estimated that approximately 200,000 children in Pakistan die every year of diarrheal diseases alone, (Pakistan Council of Research in Water Resource). This is often before a child reaches their fifth birthday.   It is pertinent to mention here that the major source of drinking water in Pakistan is groundwater, so water availability is the second most serious issue. Groundwater is the most common source of drinking water in Pakistan. Levels of groundwater are falling which lead to insecurity water scarcity and insecurity, particularly for rural communities. Hand pumps provide up to 70% of water supplies in rural areas.   Together with the Pravalli Welfare Trust, the LFCT would like to provide the funding support for a further ten schemes providing vital drinking water to rural communities. We need your help to for this.   The communities to be served are remote and isolated, often on steep hillsides in arid surroundings. Often the localities can only be reached by foot or on horseback and this is often the route for fetching water – a job that is left predominantly to the women in the communities. Each scheme will differ depending on its needs, geography and size of settlement and where villagers can afford it, they will provide the workforce and contribute to raw materials.   The scheme are due to be completed in August and they will bring relief and health.   “Our village comprising of 15 houses is at a great height from the water source and our women have to walk twice a day to fetch water from a water pit. The total distance one way is half a km. We need a pump and pipe to bring this water to our houses. We request our brothers and sisters to help us in this scheme. Jazak Allah.”
4th
Aug
2016

Newsletter Ramadhan – Shawwal 1437 A.H. Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem


Dear Supporters – Salaamun Alaikum   ONGOING APPEAL: Ophthalmology Department, Karbala – Transforming darkness into light

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In 2015, the LFCT committed to transforming the lives of thousands in Karbala. That commitment continues until the goal of a fully finished Ophthalmology Department is realised.   A person forced to imagine the beauty of nature; a parent that can’t watch their child blossom into adulthood; a child that cannot see the comfort of a mothers embrace – these are all unfortunate realities of many people living in the Middle East. Unlike many other epidemics such as cancer or HIV/AIDS, where the cure is difficult to discover, over 80% of blindness is preventable. This equates to a staggering 800 million people that suffer unnecessarily.   Staggering rising rates of blindness have had a shock effect on the economy – gross domestic product has dwindled as blindness has an indirect relationship with financial stability. When a person is struck with a debilitating disease that results in blindness in the Middle East, that person then loses his/her opportunity to support their family. A domino effect then begins to play out as that person is forced into poverty and thus cannot contribute to the economy through buying and selling goods as he/she could’ve prior to the disease.   It might also shock you to read that the majority of people living with blindness are women, most blind people need someone to care for them, and this is usually a child, more often than not   NEWS: SMS Donations For SMS giving, we now have a different feature that we call ‘Smart Text Giving’. When you text ‘Donate LFT’ to 88802 you will receive a text from us with a link to the payment page. You will then be able to make a donation but the amount selected will not automatically be deducted from your phone bill, instead you will still need to enter bank card details to be able to make a donation.   However you will then have that link ready on your phone for whenever you are ready to make a donation and donate either single or regular amount, of up to £5000. We welcome your feedback on the new service.   NEWS: Partnership with Sleepyhead Pod for 0-36 month olds. Made with love in Sweden! 3 15 AED (approx 4 USD) will be generously donated from the sale of every Sleepyhead pod sold from the Sleepyhead pod website and wholesale. Please share this with your friends and family to help generate vital funds for LFCT. Watch a video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQxql9OoMak Visit http://sleepyheadgcc.com/ for more information.   APPEAL: Iraq’s Orphans – two brothers need your help 4 5           Iraq has not had stability in more than ten years and this sees no sign of abating, leaving even more children orphaned each day. 2013 was a particularly bad year in which the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq – UNAMI considered one of the bloodiest years in Iraq’s history. Yet it continues.   Iraq struggles to cope with these sheer numbers of orphans. It is estimated that the country only has 200 social workers and psychiatrists put together, for a population of 30 million people. It has no child protection laws. Innocent children are the ones that suffer the most in Iraq’s ongoing violence. The repercussions can be felt everywhere, rippling out across society. Income generation and schooling is affected and yet with the LFCT’s joint programmes, both widows and orphans can be supported with the view that widows will become long term self-sufficient once their micro-finance business selling clothing begins to grow with their confidence and newly acquired skills.   Husam and Karar are two young brothers, just 11 and nine years old who are part of this very scheme.

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Here is their story. Nine years ago, they were in Baghdad but they shifted to Kerbala because they faced the sectarian war in Baghdad city. They suffered particularly badly as they belong to a Sada family. Now they live in Kerbala in a simple house with their mother. Last year when their father was on a journey between Baghdad and Kerbala, the family’s lives changed forever.   Their father died in a tragic car accident. At the time he was returning from work as a driver. He stayed in hospital for 13 agonising days before passing away.   Before their father died, the family lived in a good condition in comparison to their situation of today. The father bought in a good wage and they lived comfortably. As well as losing her husband, their mother had no source of income and was desperate for help with even the most basic amenities; food, medicine and clothing. She asked around relatives and charitable foundations when she came across the LFCT.   She immediately became enrolled in the microfinance programme, willing to help herself as much as possible and thrive with dignity. She wanted to remain a strong role model for her children. She is selling clothing to her friends and neighbours and when the children need it, she can buy them clothing at a discounted price. Today, Husam and Karar are studying well in their classes (fifth and the third grades) and are receiving all the support they need courtesy of the LFCT.   LFCT donors, please help to support orphans like Husam and Karar and sponsor an orphan through this project today.   APPEAL: “They made me choose between my husband and son – choose which one they should kill”

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Here we tell the story of a tragedy, a disaster that has happened to 19 families, 96 individuals in Salah AlDin. The families have fled from Mosul where seven men across the 19 families were been brutally attacked and murdered by so called ISIS. Over half of the families are now made up of just widows and their orphans and they are in very bad situation with no electric no water no food. They have fled and were assisted to Babylon to safety. They have been given land provided to them by a land owner plus a simple building. The families have been left devastated and destroyed. Not only have they lost their husbands and fathers, but they have had to leave everything they know behind. They need time and assistance to help get them back on their feet. They are appealing to the LFCT donors for that help.   Rahima’s story: Rahima Khalaf Turkey is a widow of four orphans. Rahima explains that ISIS attacked the families in the middle of the night and despite many family members trying to escape and run away, Rahima’s family became separated, her husband was with her two daughters and Rahima with her two sons. Rahima escaped, running with her two of her children. Rahima explains that those that didn’t run were killed. She feared the worst. So called ISIS occupied the area and singled out the Shia, asking the Sunni to move on quickly. They separated the men and children, took them to a different place and killed all the people who didn’t run and hide. They tortured and fired at the women and children. The next day Rahima kept her two children with a family about 20km from her origin and, although she knew she was risking her life, went to her home under the cover of night to look for her husband and daughters. He was sure her husband would have been killed already but searched for her daughters. She went back again the next night to search again and found them sheltering with another family.   Rahima is petrified she will lost her children again and locks the door with chain and lock. Rahima has been very badly affected and is terrified of leaving her children that she stays locked in the shelter and has not been able to negotiate any assistance like other widows. She is living in one room with no kitchen and has access to the shared bathroom; her room also has no electric no water and no glass in the window and door.   The project:
  • The LFCT has already distributed each family with a solar lamps.
  • We have provided 239 pieces of clothing to the families
  • We are still hoping to assist the two children with the skin disease. We propose to send them to the doctor and then buy for them plus provide them with the cost of the doctor and the transportation.
  • We are hoping to provide two portable bathrooms. These cost $200/£154 each.
  In the future we hope to support the widows with sheep. This will work similar to the goat’s microfinance but sheep have been identified as the best livestock and one that the widows already have experience in rearing. Here co-operatives will be formed where 2 – 4 families will take turn to look after the goats. The income will then be divided equally between the 19 families. The estimated price of sheep is 200.000 to 250.000 IQD/£13.In the future we also hope to lay a water pipe for constant water supplies. We are in the process of negotiating this with the local authorities. Dear LFCT donors, please give generously to this appeal. It is no fault of their own that these widows and innocent children find themselves in such awful circumstance. They have faced an awful trauma that no one should ever have to face, let alone a child.   Please help the LFCT and local partner to provide them with a hand up today, enabling them to get back on their feet, recover and thrive as a strong and self-sufficient community.  

APPEAL: One man hopes to help 22 individuals live their lives with happiness and dignity again – let us give him a helping hand

6 7 8 In the year 1948, Palestinians were uprooted from twenty cities and about four hundred villages; about seven hundred thousand Palestinians i.e. 66% of the residents of Palestine became homeless; this represented the complete deterioration of the Palestinian society with all its components and bases; it lead to the emergence of a new phenomenon in the Palestinian society which is the Palestinian Refugee Camps in the West Bank and Gaza Strip and neighbouring countries: Jordan, Syria, and Lebanon and the rest of the world.   One of these camps is Arroub Refugee Camp. These camps which bear witness to the catastrophe, homelessness and uprooting of Palestinians from their lands and homeland, symbolize their daily sufferings on all levels: cultural, social, economic, and political. They still exist up until this present moment are waiting for a political decision to put an end to their pain and suffering.   We bring you the stories of several camp residents all related and from one large family, 22 individuals in total, each with their own challenges and ways in which we, the LFCT are appealing for assistance. All of these individuals are living in assisted living in just one or two camped rooms, they have long term health conditions and many suffer psychological distress and mental disorder from the terrible events they have witnessed and conditions they have no choice but to live in.
  • Father Yousef Banat and his son Ibrahim Banat. Yousef has stiffness in his legs causing him to become immobile, he needs support to cover the daily cost of these injections.
  • Brother Ahmed Ibrahim Banat who has epilepsy and incontinence – his greatest needs are medicines for his epilepsy and incontinence pads for his dignity
  • Family of Brother Khaled Yousef Banat made up of five persons. Khaled suffers trauma and his wife, diabetes and high blood pressure. They need food and clothing for their young children.
  • Family of Brother Majed Yousef Banat comprising of six members. Majed suffers long term depression and trauma from his imprisonment. They need clothes and food for the whole family and medicine for Majed
One man hopes to help them and his own suffering family, this is his dream…   Brother Daoud is 36 years old, and has a large family of seven persons, living in Arroub Refugee Camp in miserable conditions. He is unemployed and he has no work permission due to the Israeli military orders as a previous Palestinian prisoner. The family is waiting for a new-born, this is a worrying time. Living in very bad conditions, their children is very thin due to the lack of the daily food. The UNRWA offers them urgent food assistance twice a year. Our brother Daoud has a strong faith in Allah and asks for your urgent support to have a small shop in order to cover the medicine, food, papers and clothes for his brothers and cousins families, since he is the only person who taking care of them.   Brother Daoud can take care of all of the families given as little assistance to set up a small shop. Daoud is mentally sounds and fit but through his unemployment struggles to feel he can be any use. Brother Daoud believes with some assistance to set up, he can become fully self-sustaining and can pay for the medicines and food and adequate nutrition of his large family all profiled here and totalling 22 individual members.   The total micro finance needed is Euro 18,350 (for each family this will be Euro 3,670.00). The project will cover all the daily food, medicine and other basic needs for the five families’ profiles and the project will be managed by Brother Daoud who is taking care of the five families all the time. Besides, the project will be controlled and observed by Mr Bassam Yousef Banat of Al-Quds University, based in West Bank, Palestine, who promises to monitor the project and provide audited annual accounts and annual profit summaries which he will return back to LFCT.   LFCT donors, please give generously to this noble project and help Brother Daoud in his mission to support over 22 individuals in great need. With a little input from the LFCT five families will be able to thrive again, living their lives with dignity and happiness. They do not ask for much but a simple life, let us help them in their journey and offer them a helping hand.   LFCT in Lebanon: LFCT brings some relief and hope: Food baskets and clothing for Syrian refugees in Lebanon The UN has been forced to cut down their aid budget for Syrian refugees by one third. To put this into perspective, 1 in five people in Lebanon is a Syrian refugee.   The UN agency has been distributing food vouchers to refugees since the beginning of the crisis in Syria but is facing increasing gaps in funding, “Since the beginning of this operation it has been hand to mouth,” said Etefa, spokesperson for the World Food Programme. “It is nerve-wracking for the refugees and the staff.” (The Guardian, 2015) Food vouchers have dropped drastically and Syrian refugees have no high hopes of receive further assistance.   The LFCT has boosted Syrian refugees during month of Ramadan by giving them NOT ONLY food baskets ALSO clothes which came as a huge delight. They were extremely appreciative as there are very limited opportunities to receive new clothes when needed and many have only one spare set. This is far from ideal in a highly mobile situation. Before the Syrian crisis, the majority of Lebanese people used to go to Syria and supply their families with clothes, food and many other essential items else as prices in Syrian markets used to be 50%-65%  less than in Lebanese market. However, being refugees, they have had to tighten their economic belts to adopt and survive in a higher economy.   Outcomes:
  1. LFCT With a budget of USD $20,300.00, LFCT has provided:
    1. 494 Families with 3,869 members with…
    2. 3384 pieces of clothing at 4$, 6$, 8$ per piece.
 
  1. LFCT- Manessa Stitching Workshop This project has also empowered the stitching workshop by procuring the items through the workshop itself. This has had the effect of:
    1. Assuring orders with a secured payment
    2. Enabling employees in the workshop to gain more experience by stitching for a wide range of children and adults.
  LFCT in Kenya: 301 families in Kenya benefit from relief food distributed this Ramadan Family food parcels were distributed to the villagers of Jaffery Centre in conjunction with Lady Fatemah (as) Trust during the Mahe Ramadhan food relief.   Thank you to all LFCT donors who provided for their families as well as their own this Ramadan by providing nutritious iftar. Families have no longer had to worry about where their iftar will come from, bringing them some important relief during the Holy month.   About one half of Kenya’s total agricultural output is subsistence production. Although agriculture is the mainstay of the economy, Kenya has a structural production deficit in several staples, including maize. Deficits are filled through formal and informal imports from regional and international markets. Maize is the strongly preferred main staple food, and also the most common crop grown by rural poor households. Other major food crops include beans, tubers (potatoes and cassava). Unfortunately Kenya faces recurring problems causing many low income households to worry about where their next meal is coming from. Kenya is vulnerable to a number of shocks including droughts, floods, disease, price volatility, livestock raids, and civil strife. Alongside this, climate related disruptions to production are a principal cause of instability in the food supply. In addition, agricultural production in Kenya is almost exclusively rainfall dependent, and most farmers are exposed to the risks of unreliable rainfall or prolonged drought. With climate change, droughts are expected to increase both in extent and intensity according to the USAID report issued in March 2016. Without appropriate mitigation measures, these changes will have increasing impact on the stability of the food supply and the potential for households to cope with fluctuating income.   Among many smiling faces we came across an elderly lady in her early 60’s as she sat outside her mud thatched home preparing for iftar, upon receiving the iftar parcel she was deeply grateful and had to say:   “My name is Amina Mbaraka, for many years I have struggled to feed my grandchildren and educate them for their better future. I remain thankful to Bilal Muslim Mission and LFCT that has taken an initiative to aid our troubles and above all assist us with a month supply of food to last us through with ease as we fast during the holy month.”   LFCT in Lebanon: Ramadan’s top seller in the microfinance project for the month is Kawther Kawther has worked incredibly hard this month to ensure she is top seller, especially as it has been Ramadan, she deserves a huge congratulations! Kawther has two young children and is a widow. She has been participating in the microfinance garments project since December 2015 and hopes to soon become fully self-sustaining. Kawther is from the active selling group of widows. She sells clothes because it is important for her own dignity and self-worth to be able to bring an income into the family. She does it for her children so they have a strong role model in their mother as a hardworking and independent woman. On 21 June 2016 Kawther met the other widows who were actively selling throughout the month of June and explained to them her determination for success. She has been a huge morale boost and has greatly encouraged the other widows to keep going with the work. In her own words Kather has said that, “Each woman has to depend on herself as although there are some foundations that will give support, we do not know how long this will continue. The way I have become top seller this month whilst minimising my effort is to find a person who can also sell clothes with me and we share the work and profits. I have one lady who is selling with me now and we have been working together in this way since April. Together we are growing step by step.” LFCT in Pakistan: Sister Hira Manzoor was set to complete her graduates in MBBS (Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery)  until a family tragedy threatened Hira’s dream. Hira Manzoor has successfully completed four years of her MBBS course, something she has always dreamed of. She hopes to successfully enroll on the final year thanks to the kind support of LFCT. Hira’s dream is threatened and a family tragedy last year means she is unsure she will ever finish her course. Hira’s family live in the Chakwal District of Pakistan’s Punjab province. Her father, Manzoor Hussain died of colon cancer suddenly in 2015, leaving behind three children. Her late father was an engineer in private company and earned a good wage.  Hira’s older sister, Farha Manzoor is a doctor in private hospital with a monthly income of approximately PKR 40,000/£288. Although this is a good wage, it is not enough to stretch to Hira’s fees for this final year and Fahra is supporting the whole family at present. Hira has scored well in her latest examination but because of her family’s financial challenges, is not sure if she will ever finish her degree. Hira is due to pass her final year of the MBBS degree in June, 2017 Insha’ALLAH and she is hopeful to achieve a good job with good salary in future. Amount Sponsored: Hira approached MICT, LFCT’s local partner for sponsorship for her final year fees and with the assistance of the LFCT. The fees total PKR 233,843.00/£1,685.00 With the assistance of finance to cover the fees Hira can finish her degree and quality as a junior doctor. She will be an asset to her country, providing vital medical care and advice and giving back to her community.  
5th
Sep
2016

Newsletter Shawwal – Dhu al-Qi’dah 1437 A.H. Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem


Dear Supporters – Salaamun Alaikum   APPEAL: Iraq’s Orphans Iraq has not had stability in more than ten years and this sees no sign of abating, leaving even more children orphaned each day. 2013 was a particularly bad year in which the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq – UNAMI considered one of the bloodiest years in Iraq’s history. Yet it continues. 1 There are estimated to be 800,000 children that have lost at least one parent in Iraq. Yeahiya and Mohammed are two of these children.   Yeahiya, aged 12 and Mohammed aged 15 are orphans who live with their mother and grandmother in a small, cramped house of only two rooms. The father was working as a car mechanic and worked hard to sustain the family. He suffered a tragic death dying unexpectedly from a heart attack in 2009. The family fled to Kerbala to live with close relatives where they have been supported ever since. Yeahiya and Mohammed have four other siblings and with their grandmother ageing, their mother struggles to support the family’s needs, including their education costs.   Yeahiya has suffered with serious asthma since birth, requiring regular medicine that is another cost for the family alongside occasional doctor’s appointments. The family were really struggling to keep afloat, each day living hand to mouth and taking it one step at a time. Three of the siblings, all female, have already had to leave school in order to bring in an income. The eldest son is has one year left of education and is hoping to finish, the family are doing their best to support him in his final year.   Yeahiya and Mohammed are behind in their studies as the family had little time to assist and encourage them, however, with help from the LFCT, they hope to catch up and the family can prioritise their education once again.   It costs just £30 per orphan per month – less than a price of a daily coffee. Please help us to continue supporting as many orphans as possible and give them the best start in life.   ONGOING APPEAL: Ophthalmology Department, Karbala – Transforming darkness into light In 2015, the LFCT committed to transforming the lives of thousands in Karbala. That commitment continues until the goal of a fully finished Ophthalmology Department is realised. 2 A person forced to imagine the beauty of nature; a parent that can’t watch their child blossom into adulthood; a child that cannot see the comfort of a mothers embrace – these are all unfortunate realities of many people living in the Middle East. Unlike many other epidemics, over 80% of blindness is preventable.   This equates to a staggering 800 million people that suffer unnecessarily.   When a person is struck with a debilitating disease that results in blindness in the Middle East, that person then loses his/her opportunity to support their family. A domino effect then begins to play out as that person is forced into poverty and thus cannot contribute to the economy through buying and selling goods as he/she could’ve prior to the disease.   It might also shock you to read that the majority of people living with blindness are women, most blind people need someone to care for them, and this is usually a child.   The LFCT are committed to equipping an Ophthalmology Department and providing vital medical equipment for life changing procedures, including cataract, which can save someone from going blind. It is only with your help that we can achieve this, Dear LFCT supporters, please show your generosity and kindness today.   NEWS: Partnership with Sleepyhead Pod for 0-36 month olds. Made with love in Sweden! 15 AED (approx. 4 USD) will be generously donated from the sale of every Sleepyhead pod sold from the Sleepyhead pod website and wholesale. Please share this with your friends and family to help generate vital funds for LFCT.   Watch a video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQxql9OoMak Visit sleepyheadgcc.com for more information.   APPEAL and UPDATE: The 19 families that fled from ISIS in Mosul in desperate need of clean water 3 4 Another NGO in Babil is providing them with two water tanks (1000 litres) and the water directorate has provided them with water once a week. However, this is far too little for 96 persons to live off and remain healthy.   To put this into perspective, the WHO states that the absolute minimum is 7.5 litres a day per person, this doubles to 15 litres per person in an emergency situation. Their current supplies means 1000 litres would last barely over a day for these 96 individuals. They are having to manage their water consumption, limit bathing and washing and think about every sip they take.   The families have blocked the road in protest asking the Government officials for more water and their representative has met with the following officials; Water Directorate, Municipality representative and Displacement Committee representative. Working together with the LFCT it was agreed: –       LFCT to supply two water tanks with capacity 8000 litres. –       Water directorate to fill the tanks weekly –       Water directorate to issue an official letter (Addressing to water providing department / copy to LFCT) with information of the obligation to fill the tanks weekly.   The cost for these tanks and installation equipment will be 1.250.000 IQD/£1071.67: –       2 Water tank, the capacity of each 8000L. –       2 Iron bases with 30cm height. –       2 sinks with four taps.   This will bring much needed relief for the families who are forced to fetch water from a dirty pond and ratio out the safe drinking water they receive presently.   Dear LFCT donors, please give generously to this appeal. It is no fault of their own that these widows and innocent children find themselves in such awful circumstance. They have faced an awful trauma that no one should ever have to face, let alone a child.   LFCT in Iraq: The best month yet for the Widow’s microfinance project – going from strength to strength 5 6 7 The project is progressing better than ever and even women with no experience, having never worked before are enthusiastic and really push themselves to earn as much as possible to lift themselves and their children out of poverty.   They are setting wonderful role models for their children and many are using the newly earned income to pay for or save up for University fees or supports costs such as transport for schooling. They have high ambitions for their children and will not allow anything to get in their way.   When we introduced the idea of the top seller as an incentive the beneficiaries were extremely keen to take part. This month we have had a huge interest and everyone is trying their hardest to become the top seller. This month we have chosen four top sellers – these are all women who have worked extremely hard to increase the amount they sell month on month. We felt it only right to honour them all with the top seller status in order to boost their morale at a crucial time. Here we share one of the top seller’s stories:   Widow Nada Husain Hadee has two children which she has been bringing up alone since her husband died in 2006 form a heart attack. Before his death the husband was working as a daily labourer in Karbala. Nada now rents a small house and lives with her two children, one girl and one boy. Her daughter attends Primary School and is top in her class. In her spare time the daughter helps her mother to sell clothes. Her son is also in Primary School and is due to go into secondary school next year. Both are doing very well in their studies and it is Nada’s dream that they finish their education right through to University. Nada is one of the most active participants in the project and visits the workshop frequently to top up on more clothes for her to sell. This month in particular, she has excelled.   LFCT in Lebanon: Success for Jana as she graduates! LFCT supported cancer survivor finishes High School 8 9 At just 17 years old Jana Adnan Hajj-Ahmad found out her Hodgkin’s Lymphoma relapsed. Hodgkin lymphoma is an uncommon cancer that develops in the lymphatic system, which is a network of vessels and glands spread throughout your body.   Jana needed distinct treatment including which was vital for Jana’s recovery, but it was expensive. With the help of the LFCT, US$ 25,000.00 was donated towards Jana’s medical treatment which cost over US$ 60,000.00 in total. Another organisation donated so that Jana’s medical fees were fully covered.   Despite all of these hurdles and Jana’s poor health in 2015, the family are delighted to share the news that Jana is well again and has graduated this summer.   On the16th of August 2016, the American University of Beirut- Children’s Cancer Centre has celebrated, in presence of Minister of Education Dr Elie Abu Saab and Minister of Health Wael Abu Faour, 27 cancer survival students whom passed the National High School Exam in Lebanon. Jana is one of these. The centre invited 60 people, but welcomed over 500 people to join in the celebrations!   Jana and her family members are very appreciative the support of LFCT and other donors to her treatment. Without support, Jana feels her future could be very different. We wish Jana the very best and hope that LFCT supporters will join in with sharing this good news.   LFCT in Pakistan: Ghulam’s smile says it all – relief for this hardworking tailor as his sight is saved 10 50 year old Ghulam Mustafa is a resident of Bansi, a small town in the Khushab district. Hardworking and kind, Ghulam Mustafa’s gentle ways have earned him the love and respect of his family and all who get to know him.   The only financial support for his family of seven, Ghulam Mustafa works hard as a tailor at a popular tailoring shop in the village. Three months ago he realised that his eyesight was diminishing. However, it was almost time for Ramadan and the order pace was picking up. Instead of trying to address the problem with his eyesight, Ghulam ignored it – attributing it to the long working hours and detailed work that required full focus and concentration. However, it soon became apparent that this was no small ailment.   There was no option for Ghulam but to visit the ophthalmologist who told him that he had cataract and needed surgery. The cost of surgery was astronomical for him and there was no way he could afford it.   It came as a complete surprise, however, when his co-worker told him about LRBT Shahpur and the free eye care service they provided. He visited LRBT Shahpur the very next day where his diagnosis was confirmed after a thorough check up and he was given a surgery date. Ghulam’s surgery was performed successfully and he is now able to see clearly again.   Ghulam’s story is typical of so many cataract sufferers in developing countries. Without an adequate Government health care service, expensive, private treatment is often the only option. The LRBT provide this service free of charge, supported by generous LFCT donors like yourselves, so that that individuals are saved from losing their sight and livelihood and can see the beauty in the world once again.   LFCT in Lebanon: 28 students are a step closer towards giving back to their community as full qualified nurses thanks to the LFCT Salima Medical Memorial Education Programme Second semester report, 2016 11   Though the Salima Medical Memorial Education Programme, the LFCT supports female students coming from poor social backgrounds from South-Lebanon to continue their Nursing Education in the Imam Sadr Foundation (ISF), Lebanon. The long term goal is that they are then able to support their parents and communities. The students are from predominantly large families, with livelihoods in agriculture, rooted in their land.   These female students seek to become nurses who will help people with deep care and compassion. There are currently 16 students on the BT course and 12 on the TS.   Only earlier this year top Lebanese health professionals were claiming that there was a shortage of nurses in the country and that more efficient teams were needed – this means more nurses. As refugees, predominantly from Syria continue to increase Lebanon’s population, the need for qualified nurses is ever more apparent as pressures on the healthcare system show no sign of slowing down Below are some testimonies of the students supported through the programme:   Salamu Alaykum. I am Naqiyyah, 15 years, from a family of six members living in Safad Al-Battikh – South-Lebanon. I present all my gratitude to Allah and to LFCT that enabled me to continue my nursing studies in order to sustain my family and to be able to alleviate the suffering of all people, especially poor people like us who seek desperately good health…”    “Salamu Alaykum. I am Darine, 16 years. I chose the nursing career because I am passionate for it and I can find interesting humanitarian opportunities open for me in the future. I will be able to support my poor family too, as both my parents are sick and cannot work, especially my father who has diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Thank you so much LFCT, without you I would never have been able to deserve my white coat and better, my white pure heart to share it with lot of people in pain   LFCT donors, please help the LFCT to support more students today and create a strong union of compassionate nurses in Lebanon. It is only with your support that we can continue this project in the memory of Sister Salima.   LFCT Iraq and Afghanistan Refugees: Medical Referral Programme July 2016 – 9,359 Iraqi and Afghani Patients have been funded for treated either fully and or partially since the start of this project in 2005   In July, average treatment cost per patient amounted to GB£ 350.00 while the Medical Referral Programme was able to offer GB£ 119.00 (34%) on average in assistance.   In developed countries, it is comparatively easy to live with diabetes. Insurance coverage is widespread and comprehensive, and patients suffering from diabetes generally do not need to worry about the cost of their treatment.   In developing countries, it is considerably more difficult to live with the disease, and it becomes even more challenging when the patient is a widow and a refugee without any health insurance.   65-year-old Sakineh B is in this situation. This elderly lady lost her husband many years ago. She now lives with a daughter, who is in her 30’s and suffers from a psychological condition. Despite her age and her health problems, Sakineh still works long hours selling stockings on the streets. However, her earnings are hardly enough to pay the rent and put food on the table. Sakineh is unable to pay for her medications and the syringes she needs to inject her insulin. LFCT’s partner organization pays for Sakineh’s medications through the Medical Referral Programme.   While the LFCT’s support is going a long way to empower sick refugees to make use of available treatment options, more is needed. LFCT’s partner’s beneficiaries hope for your generosity.   LFCT in Pakistan: Your choices are to drink water contaminated with fecal matter or buy expensive bottled water, something your family really cannot afford. Which would you choose?   These are your choices if you are a poor family in Korangi, Pakistan. The LFCT aims to install two further reverse osmosis plants to provide safe and free clean drinking water.    ‘Korangi piped water contaminated with fecal matter’, A recent study indicated that as well as fecal matter being present in the supply, that chlorine added to the water to make it safe for human consumption was well below recommended levels.   LFCT’s local partner in Pakistan is appealing for two new reverse osmosis water plants in Korangi. One is to be installed in Korangi II in Kutchi Abidi slum and the second in Awami Colony. This second plant will be close to the current plant installed last year. This will help to meet the high demand on the plant. The current plant has long queues forming daily as the capacity it functions at, 10,000Lwater/day is far too low. One more plant is greatly needed at this location. A queuing system is now in place but the only viable option is to increase the availability.   The locations where the plants are to be installed have population of 8 – 10,000 people. The current source of water for these families are from piped water supplies – one we have learnt is contaminated with fecal matter and a source of diarrhea, vomiting, typhoid and hepatitis. If they do not collect water from this contaminated source they must buy expensive bottled water which is not a reality for many and a burden on their income.   With the installation of the new plants the water will be supplied free of cost. There will be minimal wastage and each individual will get an amount, relative to their family size. It is hoped there will no longer be queues beyond capacity at the existing plant and families can fetch water free of cost and be assured of health and dignity.   The total for the two plants is 350,000PKR.
26th
Sep
2016

Newsletter Dhu al-Qi’dah ~ Dhu al-Hujjah 1437 A.H


Dear Supporters – Salaamun Alaikum APPEAL: Iraq’s Orphans Iraq has not had stability in more than ten years and this sees no sign of abating, leaving even more children orphaned each day. 2013 was a particularly bad year in which the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq – UNAMI considered one of the bloodiest years in Iraq’s history. Yet it continues. 12 There are estimated to be 800,000 children that have lost at least one parent in Iraq. It costs just £30 per orphan per month – less than a price of a daily coffee. Please help us to continue supporting as many orphans as possible and give them the best start in life. ONGOING APPEAL: Ophthalmology Department, Karbala – Transforming darkness into light In 2015, the LFCT committed to transforming the lives of thousands in Karbala. That commitment continues until the goal of a fully finished Ophthalmology Department is realised. A person forced to imagine the beauty of nature; a parent that can’t watch their child blossom into adulthood; a child that cannot see the comfort of a mothers embrace – these are all unfortunate realities of many people living in the Middle East. Unlike many other epidemics, over 80% of blindness is preventable. This equates to a staggering 800 million people that suffer unnecessarily. When a person is struck with a debilitating disease that results in blindness in the Middle East, that person then loses his/her opportunity to support their family. A domino effect then begins to play out as that person is forced into poverty and thus cannot contribute to the economy through buying and selling goods as he/she could’ve prior to the disease. It might also shock you to read that the majority of people living with blindness are women, most blind people need someone to care for them, and this is usually a child. The LFCT are committed to equipping an Ophthalmology Department and providing vital medical equipment for life changing procedures, including cataract, which can save someone from going blind. It is only with your help that we can achieve this, Dear LFCT supporters, please show your generosity and kindness today. LFCT: Evaluation of Vision and Hearing of 180 Iraqi Refugee Primary School Students 13 Undetected impairments of vision and hearing are one of the main reasons why children fail at school, and some of them may cause disability later on. LFCT’s partner therefore conducted evaluations for 180 primary students attending a school for refugee students, which had taken part in the evaluation program conducted in the 2014-2015 academic year. This year, first-graders and children from higher grades who had not taken part in the previous evaluation were tested. A general practitioner (GP) visited the school and performed a basic vision and hearing test for all primary school students as well as examining the students with regard to possible infestation with lice or other parasites. Dental investigations were not conducted because last years’ experience showed that the parents are unable to afford dental treatment. Children showing potential problems during the initial evaluation then received more detailed testing. Those who still showed problems were referred to a health clinic for optometry and evaluation by an ENT specialist. Most of the evaluated students turned out to be healthy (al-hamdu lillah). However, the only way to find those few who need help is to test every student. In this small group of 180 students, Zainab A Z, who is studying in 6th grade showed such severe hyperopia (farsightedness) that the doctor wondered how she had managed so far. She urgently needed glasses, which LFCT’s partner provided completely without charge for the beneficiary. It costs only about £1 to test a student, and average cost of treatment including optometry, Eyes, Nose and Throat visit (ENT), glasses and ear wax removal amounts to £15. LFCT in Pakistan: Success again for the live goats project in Pakistan – In total 297 Goats distributed 14 Ten more goats have been distributed in August in Pakistan as part of the live goats project. In total in July and August 30 more goats have been distributed across Abbottabad, Tharparkar and Shikarpur regions. These live goats have predominantly been distributed to widows who have been left destitute with little way of income generation. Many have been subject to begging for their next meal. A mixture of poor gender equality and the low social status of women in Pakistan along with pre-existing poverty have left women who have become widows destitute. The LFCT assists as many women as it can identified by their local partner. This project is simple yet effective and a live goat can provide a lifeline for widows in need of some additional income and resilience. The goats bring options and with them follow better nutrition, health and education. Providing live goats and the expertise on how to rear them and use them for all they can provide a widow and her family is not a quick fix or solution, but it can bring a widow and her children great security. It costs just £70 per goat. LFCT in Pakistan: Waiting for the day his daughters’ marry, Liaqat Ali has had his sight restored and will walk them down the aisle 15 Cataracts are very common as the eye ages. Without regular eyesight check-ups cataracts can suddenly make daily tasks extremely difficult. Yet catching a cataract in good time means a simple surgery can rectify the eye and eyesight will be restored. Unfortunately for those living in poverty, this simple procedure can prove far too expensive. The LRBT with the support of the LFCT assists in providing 40 free cataract surgeries each month. Liaqat Ali is one man who has benefitted and here we share his story. Liaqat Ali, a 70 year old man is the sole breadwinner of his family. Liaqat, cooks for a small local eatery and looks forward to seeing hi seven daughter marry. It is a dream that makes him work late into the night, striving hard to earn more and put some money aside for each of their weddings. Surrounded by poverty, Liaqat’s only aim is to survive. Earning a meagre sum of Rs. 7,500/- a month, Liaqat depends on the tips he receives to be able to cover the expenses of the family. A year ago, he realised while working that his vision had blurred over time. Horrified, he went to a local doctor who diagnosed him with cataract but the expense of surgery was far too high. Affordability not being an option, Liaqat resigned himself to trying to think of ways in which he could still provide for his family. His family was also worried about his situation. As the local doctor’s expense was too high for him to be able to afford, he ignored the disease that had already badly affected his vision. A blessing in disguise awaited Liaqat in the form of LRBT, just as he had given up all hope, he was told about LRBT Free Secondary Eye Hospital at Shahpur Sadder by a relative who himself had undergone surgery. Liaqat came to LRBT Shahpur and after complete examination, was diagnosed with cataract and lined up for surgery. His surgery was performed successfully. He was very happy when his bandage came off and he realised that he could now see the colours of life once again. “I am very thankful to entire staff of LRBT and especially kind donors of LRBT.” LFCT in Tanzania: Reliable water supply continues to bring great benefit two years on – report from renovations of the female ward at Bagamoyo Hospital, Tanzania 16 Two years ago, the refurbishing of what was a very dilapidated evacuation (minor theatre) room in the gynaecological ward of Bagamoyo district hospital was completed. We hear from Dr Jeromy Chibwana (site investigator) and Dr Godfrey Mbaruku on what the changes to the hospital have meant for patients and staff alike, two years on. The evacuation room now boasts a brand new tiled floor and walls, new ceiling with fan, an aluminium glass door and aluminium glazed window. The theatre is also equipped with a new wash basin with running tap water, serviced by two 2000 litre capacity water tanks just outside the room (larger than the capacity supplying the main operating theatre). The toilets are now cleaner and tolerable for the patients and the cleaning staff. In actual fact, the refurbished ward has now become the supplier of water to the other wards when water shortages develop across the hospital which is a common occurrence “To date, almost two years on this generous gift you have given to this ward, and the hospital in general, it is still highly appreciated. There is no other ward or department which boasts ample water supply. This ward doubles as both a gynaecological ward and general female ward. The ward has a total of 25 beds and has an admission average of 150 to 200 patients a month. You can imagine how difficult such a high turnover of patients would have been to manage without water. We have found that an education campaign for patents and staff have maximized correct hygiene behaviour practices and limited putting anything down the sinks which might cause them to clog. These have been taken as challenges, rather than problems, and we have regarded the project as an example of a simple solution to the tremendous water problem which is facing the whole hospital. This needs careful planning and commitment of all involved. Our emphasis to the hospital administration is to use the project as an example of improvement to other surrounding dispensaries and health centres. We feel it could greatly help them too to plan for a proper maintenance system to be in place for the longevity of such interventions. Once again the hospital expresses immense gratitude to the Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust for this extremely useful and long lasting gift. It will serve humanity for years to come” LFCT in Iraq: 5,760 more children become orphans every day 17 A child might become an orphan due to the death of a parent from ill health, poverty or be an innocent victim of war – but each orphan has something in common – they need love and support to flourish and thrive. The LFCT has a flagship programme in Iraq providing support to orphans and widows. The programme has come a long way since it began and although orphan sponsorship provides a vital lifeline, the LFCT is assisting and encouraging as many widows as possible to become self-sufficient with the hope of gradually reducing its support as the widows flourish. The LFCT’s work is crucial and for many orphans and widows, it really does provide a beacon of hope. Life in Iraq is tough for orphans and widows. The country and economy is at breaking point. There is a huge deficit of medical practitioners and estimates place the number or orphans at around million. You can be a beacon of hope and help to provide vital clothing supplies to Iraqi orphans and widows through the LFCT. For many orphans and widows, clothing is a luxury. Often forced to leave their home or becoming homeless after the death of one or both parents, orphans often own only the clothes on their back. They can become cold in the winter and their self-esteem can lack as they wear the same clothes day in and out, often worn out and broken. It costs just £5 to provide clothing for an orphan and £10 for widows. Please help to provide orphans and widows with new clothing today, something that will help them to have more pride and self-respect for themselves and keep them warm as the winter draws closer. LFCT in Pakistan:  Aged just 17 months old, Rida Zahra faces an uncertain future but the chance of surgery could change that 18 Rida Zahra is 17 month old. She lives in Pakistan with her family. The family have one breadwinner, the father, Muhammad Danish, who brings home PKR 12,000 per month. This is around £88. He works hard as a Computer Operator in a local private company whilst Rida Zahra’s mother looks after her daughter in the family home. The family struggle on this low income and have had an additional stress on their finances since their first and only child was born. Rida Zahra is suffering from a congenital heart disease and has been diagnosed with partial AVSD common atrium and gd II AV resurge. Rida Zahra has suffered this since she was born. Recently, a cardiologist recommended comprehensive heart surgery to help Rida Zahra live as normal life as possible. For her family, this is causing a great dilemma – the impoverished family simply cannot afford the cost of such a procedure. Having this surgical procedure is a matter of life or death for little Rida Zahra. Without this surgery Rida Zahra will live a difficult and short life. The amount is comparatively low – but for the family it is over three years of salary for Rida Zahra’s father. Essentially, Rida Zahra has a hole in her heart which means her heart cannot function properly and needs to work harder. The heart risks leaking blood between the atriums. This can ultimately lead to heart failure. By performing open heart surgery, the hole is repaired and the heart can continue to function normally. Rida Zahra will always need regular check-ups but without this surgery her condition will only worsen. The family have sought contributions from their family and community to the cost PKR 200,000 but they are still searching for the shortfall. The family has approached The Lady Fatemah (AS) Charitable Trust (LFCT) and MICT, LFCT’s local partner in Pakistan, to seek PKR 250,000.00/£1,839.00 for meeting the cost of this lifesaving surgical procedure. The LFCT will be supporting Rida Zahra’s family with the financial assistance needed for this vital operation. We will share regular reports and updates of her progress with LFCT supporters and wish her all the best in a speedy recovery. LFCT in South Lebanon: “If God provides food to insects living atop rocks in the desert; he will most certainly not leave us” Ibrahim Asaad from his Hospital bed 19 Ibrahim Assad’s story and project update on LFCT’s support for children and adults living with a disability in South Lebanon. Empowerment Association for Independent Living (EAIL) is a secular, not-for-profit, grass roots organisation that aims to empower people with disabilities in the south of Lebanon and enable them to take charge of their lives and achieve independency. EAIL already has two fully equipped therapy centres in Nabatieh and in Bint Jbeil. Besides the two centres, EAIL has an equipped school in Nabatieh that provides special education and therapies to children with disabilities. There are around 400 children with disabilities between the age of 3 and 16 the Province of Nabatieh split across the following categories; Ibrahim Assad’s story: Ibrahim Assaad, 52 years old, is a butane gas worker and father of two, Khalil, 10 years old and Hassan 7 years old both students in their village Choukine in South Lebanon. Khalil was born with a congenital defect in his foot, called Clubfoot, which is usually detected during labour and treated upon birth. Clubfoot or ‘Congenital Talipes Equinovarus’ affects Ibrahim also and involved only his right foot. Clubfoot occurs at a rate of 1 per 1,000 and is graded as mild, moderate or severe and involves the inversion of the subtalar joint, adduction at the talonvicular joint, and equinus at ankle joint, where the foot is turned to the side and it may even appear that the top of the foot is where the bottom should be. The causes of this deformity are still unknown with a suggestive implication of genetics. Usually, the involved foot, calf, and leg are smaller and shorter than the contralateral side. The treatment of this deformity is usually within two weeks of birth and it is either treated non-surgically or surgically. Without any treatment, clubfoot will result in severe functional disability, which is exactly what happened to Ibrahim Assaad, where due to negligence and impoverishment he grew up untreated to have a severe deformity in one of his feet. Despite his disability, Ibrahim moved forward he started his own family and worked hard to provide them with their daily living needs. He has worked to provide especially for his two kids, to put them in school and to cover all the incurred expenses that come along the way. Sometimes he has needed the assistance of the community but remained positive, believing that, “if god provides food to insects living atop rocks in the desert; he will most certainly not leave us”. Current Situation Ibrahim used to work in fixing butane ovens for a living relying heavily on his left leg due to the deformity in his right one. Unfortunately, in 2008, Ibrahim fractured his left foot in a work related accident, and hence, being originally unable to use his right foot he remained supine in his bed for 32 weeks after undergoing several surgeries in his left foot. This accident had severe consequences on Ibrahim’s family who were already barely able to make a living. Unable to work, the family had no income and as a self-employed professional he lacked the benefit of health insurance – a much needed asset at the time. His mother in law helped the family by paying most of his medical treatment as well as some of their living expenses. The family problems did not stop there, as a result of extended immobility, his left foot muscles atrophied and Ibrahim had to undergo an extensive program of physiotherapy to rehabilitate his muscle strength. In order to be able to work again and earn an income to support his family, Ibrahim needed to have his right clubfoot deformity corrected surgically and the only means to stabilise his foot after the surgery was to use a KAFO which cost 2,000 USD alone. This was not covered by the ministry of health, which would only cover part of his hospitalisation fees. Already being supported by his elderly in-laws and the local community, Ibrahim had no one to turn to and ask for help especially that the amounts required are quite substantial vis a vis his local community. Project Impact LFCT did not hesitate in supporting Ibrahim Assaad, where not only the remaining cost of his surgery, hospitalization and brace were covered by LFCT, but additionally his whole physiotherapy treatment has also covered. To date, LFCT has supported Ibrahim with 3,050 USD a help that has changed a long suffering of 52 years, but has also supported the future of Khalil and Hassan. Once again their dad is be able to work and provide them with their daily needs and secure their future. Ibrahim’s wife is also able to live a normal life once again, caring for her kids and being supported by her husband rather than having to care for the whole family by herself. The case of Ibrahim Assad is typical of the sort of projects the LFCT implements with the Empowerment Association for Independent Living (EAIL). By assisting with vital surgery, physiotherapy and rehabilitation, children and adults living with a disability are once again able to take control back of their lives.
7th
Nov
2016

Newsletter Dhu al-Hujjah ~ Muharrum 1437 A.H. Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem


Dear Supporters – Salaamun Alaikum   RAISE £1 FOR EATING DINER! Raise £1 per diner each time you book a table at a restaurant – Free and Easy App!   i     ChariTable Bookings is a new App available on Android and IPhones that donates £1 per diner each time you use the App to book a table or confirm a table booking at participating restaurants. The App is free, simple and quick to use. Download today and raise vital funds for LFCT for no cost to you.   Once you have downloaded the App, click on the ‘person’ icon and create an account. Then click the ‘hand’ icon along the bottom and search for Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust. Click on the trust and the ‘heart’ icon at the top. It is as easy as that! Now you can raise funds.   Then next time you go to book a restaurant search for your chosen restaurant through the App. When identified, click on the ‘plus’ in the corner of the screen. You can book participating restaurants through the app or separately by phoning or booking online. You can then ‘confirm you booking on the app’ and LFCT will receive £1 per person just for you going out to eat! If you walk into a restaurant you can also use the app by searching for the restaurant and if it is participating, clicking the ‘2 person’ symbol at the bottom of the screen and follow the instructions.   Let us know how you get on! Happy dining!   APPEAL: Iraq’s Orphans   Iraq has not had stability in more than ten years and this sees no sign of abating, leaving even more children orphaned each day. 2013 was a particularly bad year in which the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq – UNAMI considered one of the bloodiest years in Iraq’s history. Yet it continues.   ii     There are estimated to be 800,000 children that have lost at least one parent in Iraq. Mohammed and his six siblings are just seven of those children. Mohammed is nine years old and is one of seven orphans who live with their mother in Kerbala. The family are struggling, living in a house that is inadequate for their needs. The family are residing in a house belonging to the visitors of Imam Hussain (as). The family occupy the first floor. This floor has no kitchen and so all their cooking must be done outside. This means looking under the hot sun and in the cold winter.   The family faced a tragedy when the father died in a terrorist attack. He was an innocent victim, leaving a large family of young children behind.   However, the priority for Mohammed’s mother is that her children all continue to study. This is the most important activity for them to continue – she knows it will help them have a positive future with lots of opportunities.   With the help of the LFCT, it is possible that all seven children are able to stay in school. This is because the LFCT is providing $30 sponsorship per month for each student that stays in school.   Please help us to continue supporting as many orphans as possible and give them the best start in life.   ONGOING APPEAL: Ophthalmology Department, Karbala – Blindness destroys not only a person’s vision – it destroys the future of whole families   iviii       In 2015, the LFCT committed to transforming the lives of thousands in Karbala. That commitment continues until the goal of a fully finished Ophthalmology Department is realised.   A person forced to imagine the beauty of nature; a parent that can’t watch their child blossom into adulthood; a child that cannot see the comfort of a mothers embrace – these are all unfortunate realities of many people living in the Middle East. Unlike many other epidemics, over 80% of blindness is preventable.   This equates to a staggering 800 million people that suffer unnecessarily.   When a person is struck with a debilitating disese that results in blindness in the Middle East, that person then loses his/her opportunity to support their family. A domino effect then begins to play out as that person is forced into poverty and thus cannot contribute to the economy through buying and selling goods as he/she could’ve prior to the disease.   It might also shock you to read that the majority of people living with blindness are women, most blind people need someone to care for them, and this is usually a child.   The LFCT are committed to equipping an Ophthalmology Department and providing vital medical equipment for life changing procedures, including cataract, which can save someone from going blind. It is only with your help that we can achieve this, Dear LFCT supporters, please show your generosity and kindness today.   URGENT APPEAL: 300,000 starving children in Yemen     vvi      300,000 children are starving in Yemen. That is equivalent to the population of a city the size of Coventry.   Children have once again become the largest sufferers of war as a Saudi-led coalition against Houthi rebels continues to bear down on the country. With strategic airstrikes on key ports and factories, Yemen, who is dependent on importing most of its food supply, has simply not got enough food to feed its starving children. Ironically, bags of flour lie at ports but cranes at the ports have been destroyed so the flour lies in bags, rotting. One cooking oil factory that provided 40% of Yemen’s oil has also gone up in flames. The food that is available is extortionate and many poor families have no choice but to go hungry. These cruel tactics of war are slowly starving a nation. It is the children that are dying first.   The lack of food has now become critical, mothers who are themselves malnourished cannot provide milk for their children. Children are being fed bread dipped in goats milk, they become thinner, their tummies bulge and they begin to lose critical muscle. Parents watch on in anguish – they have been made powerless to do anything. There is aid getting through, but it is still not enough. The LFCT would like to do their bit and provide some emergency food assistance to children on the brink of starvation. We need your help to do this. No child should go hungry in 2016. No child should die of starvation. Please donate what you can – perhaps skip a meal out with friends and family and donate what you would have spent to feed a child in Yemen.   LFCT in Pakistan: “Many Thanks to LFCT who saved my daughter’s life”   vii     Rida Zahra, 17 months, belongs to a low income family of federal Islamabad Capital Territory of Pakistan. She is suffering from a congenital heart disease and has been diagnosed with partial AVSD common atrium & grade II AV regurge, right from the time she was born. Recently, a cardiologist recommended a heart surgery to deal with this ailment. But Rida Zahra’s impoverished family cannot afford the cost of such a procedure. They appealed to the LFCT and the operation has now gone successfully, with Rida Zahra making a good recovery.   The total cost of the procedure was £3,615. The family raised just under half of this and the LFCT funded the remainder, totalling £1,947.     LFCT in Iraq: New shows and ready for school!      viiiix      Orphans in Al-Hamam delighted at they no longer have to walk barefoot.   The 19 families who sought safety from so called Islamic State in Al-Hamam have been assisted by the kindness and generosity of the communities around them. The LFCT have played their part in complementing these efforts by most recently distributing school shirts to 24 boys and 18 girls.   At the distribution, the families expressed a concern that the children were walking around barefoot. This was becoming a barrier to them continuing their education since the nearest school is 2km away. This journey is made by foot, and without shoes is unbearable, especially for young children.   Without attending school, the future will be bleak for these children. A good education will open up opportunities for them throughout their lives. Children will be able to get stable and well paid jobs and or girls in particular, education means they will be less likely to marry at a young age.   48 students, 20 girls and 28 boys, were identified as needing shoes. Of these, only 12 are in Secondary school, the rest are in Primary school.   The most difficult step was measuring children’s shoe size. The LFCT’s local partner arranged for a local shoe shop to come and correctly measure the children’s feet to get the right fit. They bought along 11 different types of show for the children to choose from.   The local shoe shop provided the pairs at 5,000 IQD/ £3.50 each, making the total cost 24,000 IQD/ £168.00.The shoe shop correctly fitted the shoes and made sure all children were comfortable.   All the families said duaa to the LFCT supporters and families. They pray for you for a long life and very good health. Some of them commented that, “without the help of LFCT we couldn’t imagine our life how to be”, “thanks for Allah SWT for sending us people just like you”.   LFCT in Iraq: Orphan Sayyidah Nabaa is determined not to give up her dream of becoming a Doctor   x     Sayyidah Nabaa Muthana Jaffar Kathum AlMusawi lives with her mother and three sisters. Their father was killed back in 2006 in Dayala when Nabaa was just 6 years old. Her youngest sister had only just been born and cannot remember her father. She only has a few photographs to remember him by. The family are now living in a small rented house in Kerbala. With no men in the family and three young children, the family find getting by very difficult. There is no-one else to look after the children and Zainab, Sayyidah Nabaa’s mother, must fit work around bringing up young children.   Sayyidah Nabaa would love to become Doctor. Nabaa and her sisters have not skipped or missed out on education despite their difficult circumstances. Sayyidah Nabaa is certainly not willing to give up her dream of becoming a Doctor easily!   Sayyidah Nabaa’s mother would love more than anything to support her daughter to study Medicine, but the reality is that there is no spare income for this. Sayyidah Nabaa is appealing to the LFCT supporters to fund her final two years of Secondary school followed by four years of Medical College and, if she gets the grades to be admitted, a further two years to finish her Medicine degree.   The estimated cost is US$ 1,000.00 per year to support Sayyidah Nabaa in her journey. Could you be one of her supporters?   LFCT in Iraq: By helping just one individual, we can help a whole family   xi     Sayyidah Zainab Ali Aziz AlMusawi is in the sixth year of Secondary school. In 2007 Sayyidah Zainab’s life changed forever when her father died suddenly of a heart attack. Sayyidah Zainab’s mother was left alone to look after five children, the youngest only a baby. The family have struggled for nearly a decade, yet their mother has always prioritized education. Now, she hopes it will pay off.   Sayyidah Zainab’s wishes are to study accounting and finance after finishing school. She knows that the situation of her family means she will need to rely on the kindness and goodwill of others to help her continue her studies all the way through to graduation.   Sayyidah Zainab is a conscientious student, averaging 75% in her latest examinations. She excels in mathematics and would love to make a career out of it. Zainab hopes that she will earn a good wage and be able to support her younger siblings though their education also.   Sayyidah Zainab is appealing to the LFCT for assistance with her fees and transportation to study. The cost of this is $1,000.00 per year. With a little investment in her future, Sayyidah Zainab can become a strong role model for her younger siblings and community members. By helping just one individual, we can help a whole family.   Can you make a donation towards Sayyidah Zainab and her family’s future? A little will go a long way to helping this bright young student flourish.   LFCT in Pakistan: Generous shopkeeper with a heart of gold can serve his customers once again   12,987 Free Cataracts performed from 2007 to 30th September 2016, here is Bux’s story.   xii   Bux – a 61 year old shopkeeper living in the marginalise town of Farooqabad, has learnt to see and understand life from over the shop counter; people in need, people trying to get items on credit, people who are unable to pay and the forgiveness that he must render to those who genuinely are unable to pay.   With a monthly income of only Rs. 10,000/£78.00 and four unmarried daughters whose future he must think and plan for, Imam is forever under stress. His income barely puts food on the table. Inventory loss, theft, and being soft hearted enough to extend credit to those who need it, Imam finds it difficult to do much else except feed his children. He can cover only the bare essentials.   Two years ago, he noticed his diminishing vision while still at work. A customer asked him for an item but even searching for it, he could not see it. To his amazement, the item was found right in front of him. Imam Bux was horrified. He went to several local clinics and they diagnosed him with cataract but the expanse of surgery was too high for him to be able to afford.   Looking at his financial position, a person from his village told him about LRBT Shahpur. He decided to pay a visit. He came into the LRBT Shahpur and was given a complete examination. He was diagnosed with cataract and given a surgery date.   His surgery was performed successfully. He was very happy when he came to know that he can now enjoy the colours of life again. “I am very thankful to entire staff of LRBT and especially the kind donors of LRBT who have let me go back to my life again” Thank you.   The LFCT is supporting life changing surgery to correct cataracts and make sure blindness is prevented wherever possible. It is said that 80% of the worlds blindness is avoidable.   Please help the LFCT to fund more cataract operations and turn people Like Bux’s life around. Thank you.   LFCT: Medical Referral Program (September 2016) Health is the best of all blessings (Imam Ali peace be upon him)   45 patients were assisted with treatment cost in September 2016, raig the total to 9,272 patients between October 2005 and September 2016, including 2,456 children aged 18 years and less.   Mona H has had a very hard life. Aged 57 today, she was trained as an accountant in Iraq, but had to escape from persecution by Saddam at a young age. In exile, she married and had two daughters. Her husband, also an Iraqi refugee, eked out a meagre living working at different menial jobs. In 2006, he suffered a brain stroke that left him house-bound, mentally confused and dependent on his wife’s care. The family survived on monthly assistance granted by Mona’s brother-in-law, who was fairly wealthy. Mona herself fell ill with breast cancer in 2008, underwent cancer treatment and is in remission since then. When her husband passed away in 2011, Mona’s brother-in-law discontinued his assistance. Mona, unable to work due to her illness and in despair, applied to the office of LFCT’s partner to ask for help. Mona is still in need of periodic check-ups to make sure that her cancer has not relapsed, but is unable to afford the cost. LFCT’s partner paid 60% of the cost of her tests, putting her and her two daughters’ mind at rest.   Please, continue to donate to this project. In September, average treatment cost per patient amounted to 335 GBP while the MRP was able to offer 119 GBP (35.5%) on average in assistance. 45 patients and their families send their thanks and prayers to you, LFCT’s generous donors.    
5th
Dec
2016

Newsletter Muharrum ~ Safar 1437 A.H. Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem


Dear Supporters – Salaamun Alaikum   RAISE £1 FOR EATING DINER! Raise £1 per diner each time you book a table at a restaurant – Free and Easy App!  ii ChariTable Bookings is a new App available on Android and IPhones that donates £1 per diner each time you use the App to book a table or confirm a table booking at participating restaurants. The App is free, simple and quick to use. Download today and raise vital funds for LFCT for no cost to you.   Once you have downloaded the App, click on the ‘person’ icon and create an account. Then click the ‘hand’ icon along the bottom and search for Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust. Click on the trust and the ‘heart’ icon at the top. It is as easy as that! Now you can raise funds.   Then next time you go to book a restaurant search for your chosen restaurant through the App. When identified, click on the ‘plus’ in the corner of the screen. You can book participating restaurants through the app or separately by phoning or booking online. You can then ‘confirm you booking on the app’ and LFCT will receive £1 per person just for you going out to eat! If you walk into a restaurant you can also use the app by searching for the restaurant and if it is participating, clicking the ‘2 person’ symbol at the bottom of the screen and follow the instructions.   Let us know how you get on! Happy dining!     NEWS: Charity Checkout iii Accepting donations online has become incredibly popular in recent years. As such, we at the LFCT want to make it as easy as possible for you to support us online.   We have recently reviewed our online giving platform – JustGiving and have found that supporters would prefer a webpage that is integrated with the Trust’s own website.   We will now be working with Charity Checkout to deliver this and importantly, send as much money as possible directly to deliver our work.   It is now simpler than ever for you to donate online. Just visit http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate-through to donate online directly through our website. If you had previously been going through JustGiving, you can now do everything directly through the Trust’s website.   You will no longer be redirected and you can even set up a regular donation through our own website. We look forward to hearing your feedback and thank you for your continued support that is changing lives.     APPEAL: Help a family get back on their own two feet Please read below and share a thought for this family today. Any assistance to help them during this difficult time will be greatly received.   i   Amina Wanjiru lived in the slums of Dandora, Kenya with her husband Mohammed and three children. She passed away in November 2016. The eldest daughter is Fatima, aged 19 who recently finished high school and now sits at home as the family can’t afford to pay for higher education. Muslim, who is in form two had to stop going to school midway through the 3rd term as the family can no longer afford to pay for her fees. The youngest son Yusuf, aged just nine is still only in class standard four, but sadly with the family’s only breadwinner no longer able to work he might end up dropping out especially now that his mother has passed away.   This has been the chain of events since Amina got hit by a car several months ago. Amina and her colleague were heading home from work and when crossing the road, they both got hit by a car and tragically, Amina broke her leg in the process.  The driver did not stop away and since Amina was helped to hospital by some neighbours. She was taken to Kenyatta Hospital which is a public hospital where her initial diagnosis confirmed that her leg was broken and she would require surgery to insert a plate to heal the broken bone. Amina was not making a recovery and the bill was accumulating. The neighbours decided to move her to Langata Hospital they had relatives working. Due to poor treatment at the public hospital, her leg wound had become infected. Surgery was undertaken at the new hospital and her infected wound was treated and the metal plate inserted. She was then released after a week of observation. She was then going to the doctor on a weekly basis. Alhamdulillah, the neighbours managed to clear that bill with the help of well-wishers Amina’s husband lost his job after dedicating his time to Amina’s recovery and spending time at her bedside.   After a few weeks, Amina was at the hospital when she felt very dizzy. The doctors found that she was extremely dehydrated and her wound infected which had caused her to have a fever. She was then hospitalised for approximately two weeks and the doctors treated her to speed up her recovery. Sadly, she passed away in November.   The neighbours are now appealing for assisting with the final bill which totals £1,600. The neighbours will try and help Amina’s family bear the loss of a wife and mother. Any additional support for the family will also be a huge support at this time.   Dear LFCT donors, please open your hearts and pray for the family during this time of loss. Let us help relieve some of the pain the family are feeling and assist them in paying the final medical bill and supporting them whilst they get back on their own two feet. Thank you on behalf of the neighbours of the family.   APPEAL: Restoring the road to independence – appeal from villagers in Kot Jindan, Pakistan iv Kot Jindan is a small village between the mountains behind Islamabad, Pakistan. The village has a population of 3,000 people with approximately 200 of them coming to Islamabad for work, medical facilities and studies. The road they travel on is 5 – 6 Km long. However the road is in a very poor condition; uneven, rocky and crumbling. First it climbs a steep mountain before descending down into the valley where the village is. For the villagers, the road is vital. They have tried to repair and stabilise the road in parts using their own savings.   However, the villagers live in one of the poorest parts of Pakistan and the road still remains largely unpassable in places.   Accessing Islamabad brings lifeline to villagers, who through hard work and dedication are working their hardest to make a better living for their families and community.   The villagers of Kot Jindan are appealing to the LFCT for 200 bags of cement at a cost of 120,000 RS/ £919 to concrete the remaining unpassable and unstable section of the road. The villagers will provide the gravel and labour themselves to take ownership of the project.   With a little bit of help to get the road in a better working order the villagers will be able to continue working and travelling into Islamabad. The journey will be made much easier and quicker and the villagers will be able to use motorcycles and small cars once again. Young adults in the village will be able to attend college and University and continue on a path of independence.   Please help to enable the villagers to repair the road by donating a bag of cement or two for the villagers – one bag of cement costs less than £5. Thank you.   APPEAL: Iraq’s Orphans Iraq has not had stability in more than ten years and this sees no sign of abating, leaving even more children orphaned each day. 2013 was a particularly bad year in which the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq – UNAMI considered one of the bloodiest years in Iraq’s history. Yet it continues. v Equipping Hirjan and her siblings with the tools to finish education and stand on their own two feet Youngest of six siblings, Hirjan lost her father in 2012 when she was just a few months old. Hirjan has no memory of her father – he simply didn’t return home one day. He was brutally attacked died from his injuries on his way home from his field one day.   Hirjan’s father was the family breadwinner and since his loss they have all suffered not only emotionally to adjust but also to simply get by. They moved in with relatives and together with their support are able to live a simple existence, Hirjan’s siblings are in school and her eldest brother is due to finish secondary school soon – it is the family’s dream that all of the children can continue in education for as long as possible. The same dream that parents around the world have for their children.   Iraq struggles to cope with the sheer numbers of orphans. Children are the ones that suffer the most in Iraq’s ongoing violence. The repercussions can be felt everywhere, rippling out across society, threatening to have long term damage – it is thought that 7 in 10 orphaned boys are likely to become career criminals and girls much more likely to turn to prostitution.   Income generation and schooling in Iraq is severely affected and yet with the LFCT’s joint programmes, both widows and orphans can be supported with the view that widows will become long term self-sufficient once their micro-finance business selling clothing begins to grow with their confidence and newly acquired skills. They have the passion and determination and just need a hand up to get started. 136 Orphans and 60 extremely vulnerable families were sponsored in the third quarter of 2016 and 594 sponsorships were paid.   Please help to support LFCT’s flagship programme today. With your support they can thrive. Thank you. $30 per month will pay for an orphan like Hirjan’s living and schooling needs, equipping her with the tools to thrive and stand on her own two feet.   ONGOING APPEAL: Ophthalmology Department, Karbala – Blindness destroys not only a person’s vision – it destroys the future of whole families   In 2015, the LFCT committed to transforming the lives of thousands in Karbala. That commitment continues until the goal of a fully finished Ophthalmology Department is realised.   A person forced to imagine the beauty of nature; a parent that can’t watch their child blossom into adulthood; a child that cannot see the comfort of a mothers embrace – these are all unfortunate realities of many people living in the Middle East. Unlike many other epidemics, over 80% of blindness is preventable.   This equates to a staggering 800 million people that suffer unnecessarily.   When a person is struck with a debilitating disease that results in blindness in the Middle East, that person then loses his/her opportunity to support their family. A domino effect then begins to play out as that person is forced into poverty and thus cannot contribute to the economy through buying and selling goods as he/she could’ve prior to the disease.   It might also shock you to read that the majority of people living with blindness are women, most blind people need someone to care for them, and this is usually a child.   The LFCT are committed to equipping an Ophthalmology Department and providing vital medical equipment for life changing procedures, including cataract, which can save someone from going blind. It is only with your help that we can achieve this, Dear LFCT supporters, please show your generosity and kindness today.   LFCT in Pakistan “I carried water on my head twice a day for 45 years. It gives me great pleasure to see that my granddaughters will be spared of this laborious work” – 14 new water schemes reach remote Villages in rural Pakistan vi Between September and November, a further 14 schemes have been completed. Although each Village or locality is distant, all share some common characteristics; that fetching water was something that require an arduous and often long journey.   Often the localities can only be reached by foot or on horseback and this is often the route for fetching water – a job that is left predominantly to the women in the communities. By bringing water to their doorsteps, these schemes will save women time and hard work that takes away from income generation or education.   Between November and December, the LFCT and partner, Pravalli Welfare Trust aim to provide water schemes to a further 1,900 people.   For these water schemes it costs the equivalent of around just £2.40 to provide clean water to one person. That is the same as a daily coffee or cup of tea from any high street coffee shop – could you give up your daily morning coffee and make one at home instead? Per week, that could bring clean water to up to 7 individuals – or 28 in a month.   Groundwater is the most common source of drinking water in Pakistan. Levels of groundwater are falling which lead to insecurity water scarcity and insecurity, particularly for rural communities. Hand pumps provide up to 70% of water supplies in rural areas.   LFCT supporters, please help us to continue bringing life changing water to people’s doorsteps.   LFCT in Pakistan – Book lover able to continue reading and working for the future of his family  vii A helping hand at a local bookshop, Ahmed Yar works very hard to sustain his family. Salaries are low in Pakistan and he earns enough for daily food and basic necessities for his six-person family, but there is little left at the end of the month for contingencies. Ahmed loves his work and finds solace amongst books – his best friends and companions.   The sudden deterioration of his eyesight took him by surprise. While at the bookstore where he works, he realised he was struggling to read the titles on the top shelf. Ahmed realised his eyesight was rapidly deteriorating and he decided he should seek professional help from an ophthalmologist as he knew something wasn’t right.   He went to the ophthalmologist in the hope that there would be some affordable cure for his ailment. He was diagnosed with cataract and prescribed immediate surgery. The price however, was too high for him to be able to afford. He returned home but did not give up and discussed his problem with his close friends. One of them mentioned LRBT – a completely free of cost eye care hospital for people like Ahmed living in the poorest communities in Pakistan. They visited LRBT Shahpur the very next day. Ahmed’s diagnosis was confirmed and he was assigned a surgery date for the very next week.   Ahmed Yar’s treatment was successful like that of thousands of others who visit LRBT each day. Ahmed is now back at work and is more appreciative of the blessings of Allah – even the smallest of them. “I was occupied by providing for my family, I never stopped for a second to thank God for the blessings I do have – the eyes, the hands, the health. I am now a more grateful person for sure”.
4th
Jan
2017

Newsletter Rabi Al-Awal ~ Rabi Al-Thanu ~ 1438 A.H. Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem


Dear Supporters – Salaamun Alaikum   RAISE £1 FOR EATING DINER! Raise £1 per diner each time you book a table at a restaurant – Free and Easy App!    ii ChariTable Bookings is a new App available on Android and IPhones that donates £1 per diner each time you use the App to book a table or confirm a table booking at participating restaurants. The App is free, simple and quick to use. Download today and raise vital funds for LFCT for no cost to you. Once you have downloaded the App, click on the ‘person’ icon and create an account. Then click the ‘hand’ icon along the bottom and search for Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust. Click on the trust and the ‘heart’ icon at the top. It is as easy as that! Now you can raise funds.   Then next time you go to book a restaurant search for your chosen restaurant through the App. When identified, click on the ‘plus’ in the corner of the screen. You can book participating restaurants through the app or separately by phoning or booking online. You can then ‘confirm you booking on the app’ and LFCT will receive £1 per person just for you going out to eat! If you walk into a restaurant you can also use the app by searching for the restaurant and if it is participating, clicking the ‘2 person’ symbol at the bottom of the screen and follow the instructions.   Let us know how you get on! Happy dining!   iii   NEWS: Charity Checkout Accepting donations online has become incredibly popular in recent years. As such, we at the LFCT want to make it as easy as possible for you to support us online.   We have recently reviewed our online giving platform – JustGiving and have found that supporters would prefer a webpage that is integrated with the Trust’s own website.   We will now be working with Charity Checkout to deliver this and importantly, send as much money as possible directly to deliver our work.   It is now simpler than ever for you to donate online. Just visit http://www.ladyfatemahtrust.org/donate-through to donate online directly through our website. If you had previously been going through JustGiving, you can now do everything directly through the Trust’s website.   You will no longer be redirected and you can even set up a regular donation through our own website. We look forward to hearing your feedback and thank you for your continued support that is changing lives.     APPEAL: We need your help to enable a much needed Doctor in Gaza to graduate   Mohammed Nabil El Salahat is a top student achieving 97.8% on his last examination report card. Mohammed is currently in his final year at Al-Azher University in Gaza City studying Medicine. His first year’s fees were paid for from a scholarship due to his high grades under a Ministry of Education initiative. He has taken out loans to cover the rest of his fees but is not eligible for any more. Mohammed’s 11-member family lives in Al Maghazi Refugee Camp which was established in 1948 for Palestinian refugees. The family house is furnished with old furniture and second-hand appliances. His father’s salary stretches only to cover costs for a simple and humble living.   1   Mohammed’s full course will last for six years and costs a total of 20,700 Jordanian dinars/£23,876. Mohammed lives in a very large family. His father’s income is poor and he is due to retire later this year. Mohammed is not eligible for any further grants this year but as an aspiring doctor in Gaza, it would be a travesty for him not to be able to practice and finish his degree.   This year, Mohammed’s course will cost 2,400 Jordanian dinars/£2,768.00. He is appealing to the LFCT to cover his final course’s fees and enable him to graduate and become a fully qualified Doctor. He will be able to give back to his community and share his passion for medicine. Gaza is one of the places Doctors are the most needed and where aid agencies largely supply hospitals with staff.   Mohammed had to say this about what being a Doctor means to him, “Studying medicine was my dream since I was child. So, I decided to study hard to get a high average in high school that will be enable me to join the faculty of medicine in Al Azhar University in Gaza, Alhamdiullah. My dream will not stop at this point. I want to complete my higher studies and specialize in internal medicine and be a good doctor who serves his country.  I would be very thankful if you can help me in my education fees.”   Mohammed has got so far, let’s help him finish his studies today.   APPEAL: Iraq’s Orphans   HUsaain Ahmed   Iraq has not had stability in more than ten years and this sees no sign of abating, leaving even more children orphaned each day. 2013 was a particularly bad year in which the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq – UNAMI considered one of the bloodiest years in Iraq’s history. Yet it continues.   Elder brother sacrifices his own education to give his siblings the chance of a brighter future   Hussain is thirteen years old and looks up to his older brother, Ali, with great admiration and respect. Without Ali working hard and sacrificing his own education, none of Hussain’s brothers and sisters would be able to continue in education themselves. Hussain’s family rely on Ali to bring in a vital income for the family and he works hard as a daily wage labourer to ensure his family can have adequate nutrition and the family can work to lift themselves out of poverty.   Just last year the family’s lives changed forever when their father passed away after a heart attack in their home in Kerbala. Hussain has three siblings and they now reside with their mother in one rented room. Hussain’s mother had recently started working on the microfinance project, and assisted by the LFCT on the orphan sponsorship programme, Hussain is able to continue in school along with his younger sibling.   A pattern that repeats itself in so many families where a parent is lost in Iraq, is that at least one child will normally drop out of school. Along with Ali, Hussain’s eldest sister, Zainab also left school after her father passed away as the family struggled to pay her transport and costs for attending school.   In the near future, it is hoped all of the siblings will return to education once more.   The LFCT is supporting Iraq’s orphans and widows to find their path to a better future, giving them a helping hand after they find themselves in difficult circumstances. With your support, children like Hussain and his siblings can stay and even return to school. With an education and opportunities, they can make their own bright futures. Just one extra year of schooling can increase children’s earning ability as adults by up to 10% (Global Partnership for Education, 2016).   $30 per month will pay for an orphan like Hirjan’s living and schooling needs, equipping her with the tools to thrive and stand on her own two feet. Thank you.   APPEAL: The chance to stand on their own two feet – school lunch programme for orphaned girls in Kerbala   In Iraq, thirty-four percent of girls do not advance to secondary education and thirty per cent of women are illiterate (DRF, 2016). The LFCT and its partner in Iraq, the Development and Relief Foundation (DRF) believes women play an important role in society. However, women and girls are unfairly disadvantaged, and often fall behind in education and the chance to take charge of their own futures. For these reasons, DRF purchased land, acquired permits, and laid the foundation for a new girl’s school, which opened in Kerbala in November 2014.   W15320482_10209735370074573_842480357_n     At present the school is educating 131 female students, 97 of whom are orphans and the remaining 34, from extremely disadvantaged backgrounds. 117 of which are non-sada and 14 of which are sada.   The students spend eight hours at the school each day. Most leave their homes or residences without food for the day. This means they work hard throughout the whole school day, very few ever missing a day, but nearly all, without any food. The girls are passionate about their education and taking charge of their own futures, but without proper nourishment throughout the day, many are becoming weaker and find it hard to concentrate.   Given sufficient nutritious food throughout the day the students will be able to put their full concentration to the school day ahead. The LFCT would like to support the 131 students with coupons to collect food from a restaurant in the same building as the school to provide a guaranteed meal once a day.   The LFCT would like to pilot providing coupons for a substantial and nutritionally balanced meal until the end of January. The pilot will last 77 days in total, for 131 girls making the total £6,758 or just £51 per girl.   Just £51.00 could help build the foundations for a future for these girls where they can stand on their own two feet.   After the pilot scheme the LFCT hopes that this project will be self-supporting and self-financing. We plan that the micro-finance project in Lebanon will be able to pair up with the school and sell items of clothing to generate income for the nutrition programme.   For £51.00 can you assist one girl this winter to receive the food to enable her to stay at school and have the chance at a brighter future? Thank you.   ONGOING APPEAL: Ophthalmology Department, Karbala – Blindness destroys not only a person’s vision – it destroys the future of whole families   2     In 2015, the LFCT committed to transforming the lives of thousands in Karbala. That commitment continues until the goal of a fully finished Ophthalmology Department is realised.   A person forced to imagine the beauty of nature; a parent that can’t watch their child blossom into adulthood; a child that cannot see the comfort of a mothers embrace – these are all unfortunate realities of many people living in the Middle East. Unlike many other epidemics, over 80% of blindness is preventable.   This equates to a staggering 800 million people that suffer unnecessarily.   When a person is struck with a debilitating disease that results in blindness in the Middle East, that person then loses his/her opportunity to support their family. A domino effect then begins to play out as that person is forced into poverty and thus cannot contribute to the economy through buying and selling goods as he/she could’ve prior to the disease.   It might also shock you to read that the majority of people living with blindness are women, most blind people need someone to care for them, and this is usually a child.   The LFCT are committed to equipping an Ophthalmology Department and providing vital medical equipment for life changing procedures, including cataract, which can save someone from going blind. It is only with your help that we can achieve this, Dear LFCT supporters, please show your generosity and kindness today.   LFCT Water Projects – Water Projects in India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, West Bank, Palestine, Gaza, Palestine, Pemba Island, Ethiopia and Malawi   Total number of water schemes totals 353 as of 8th December.   The LFCT needs your help to continue providing clean water to families and communities in our partner countries.   “Inadequate sanitation, hygiene or access to water increase the incidence of diarrhoeal diseases. The highest proportion of deaths and DALYs, as well as the highest absolute numbers, occur in countries with high mortality patterns, such as in Africa and parts of South-East Asia. Most diarrhoeal deaths in the world (88%) is caused by unsafe water, sanitation or hygiene,” WHO, 2016   Here we share some comments from villagers helped to date   3     Village resident, female, aged 20 “I saw my mother and other women in the village fetching water from the well every day on their heads. The distance was half a Km, so every pitcher meant one Km to travel. I always despised it and could not imagine doing so for many many years to come. I asked my mother to marry me to a locality where this donkey work is not done. She scolded me saying that your few classes of education has spoiled you and that I am lazy. Thank you brothers and sisters for your help. Allah will certainly reward you for looking after fellow human. You are great and your thoughts for helping humanity are great.”    Village resident, male, aged 65 “Due to scarcity of water we had to leave our homes after 3 / 4 years when shortage of water compelled us to do so. But due to these pumps provided by our benevolent brothers and sisters from far off places, there is less likelihood of a long drought, meaning we hope to stay in the village. We thank you and pray that Allah look after their needs in this life and reward you in Hereafter befittingly.”   LFCT Food Baskets – 91 Orphaned and 74 Very Vulnerable Refugee Families Received Food Baskets in the Third Quarter of 2016   Since 2013, LFCT’s partner organization has implemented a programme of periodic food distributions among its most needy beneficiaries. The families benefiting from this program are refugee families in long-term refugee situations who face employment restrictions that make it difficult for them to gain enough money to adequately support their families. Among the 165 families benefiting in the third quarter of 2016, 126 are headed by a woman. Most of these women work as cleaners, cooks or industrial seamstresses. Wages in these informal fields of work are low and refugees are unable to demand fair wages. While the women and men heading the benefiting families are industrious and hard-working, circumstances prevent them from gaining enough to support their families.   Dignity means not having to ask for assistance. It is the aim of LFCT’s partner to preserve the dignity of these families as well as their health and state of nutrition by distributing food baskets containing basic, non-perishable food items in regular intervals. The tables below show the number of distributed food baskets per location in the third quarter of 2016 as well as project expenditure:   Dear LFT donors: Average cost per family for providing a food basket containing basic food items that will last a month or more – depending on family size – is about GBP 29.00. Please, continue to donate generously. Your less fortunate Muslim brothers and sisters will include you in their prayers.   LFCT in Pakistan – Helping to restore Sardar Ali’s eyesight and hope   4   People living in Pakistan lack sufficient access to even basic medical and health facilities. The country is poor and its citizens suffer with a poor infrastructure. One Pakistani citizen, Sardar Ali, a 66 year old man from the outskirts of Sargodha, is one such person that is suffering the consequences of his nation’s rising poverty levels.   Living in a poor country, salaries are low and Sardar is barely able to earn enough to feed his children. The sole breadwinner for the family of six, Sardar works in a small hotel in his area, bringing home a sum of Rs. 9,500/£72 per month.   A year ago, while still at work, Sardar realised that he was losing his eyesight. Horrified, he tried all local and home remedies. When nothing worked, he had no option left but to visit a doctor who diagnosed him with cataract. However, the expenses of the cataract surgery were too high for him to be able to afford. His family were worried about his situation and prayed that they may find a miracle cure for his ailment. As the local doctor’s expenses were too high for Sardar, he felt he had no choice but to ignore the issue and delay treatment. The disease had already badly affected his vision and worsened as the days and months passed by. Soon, Sardar could see no more and was without a job or any future prospects.   A blessing in disguise motivated Sardar Ali when he had given up all hope. Sardar was told about LRBT Free Secondary Eye Hospital at Shahpur. Sardar came to LRBT Shahpur and after a detailed examination, he was diagnosed with cataract. Assigned a surgery date for the very next week, Sardar’s surgery was performed successfully. Sardar was delighted and vowed to spread the good word about LRBT. He can now return to work and continue enjoying life.   “I am very thankful to entire staff of LRBT and especially the kind donors of LRBT who make it possible for people like us to live our lives again.’     Please help the LFCT to fund more cataract operations and turn people Like Sardar’s life around. Thank you.
30th
Jan
2017

Newsletter Rabi Al-Thany ~ Jumaada al Awal 1438 A.H. Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem


Dear Supporters – Salaamun Alaikum

  RAISE £1 FOR EATING DINER! Raise £1 per diner each time you book a table at a restaurant – Free and Easy App!     ii   ChariTable Bookings is a new App available on Android and IPhones that donates £1 per diner each time you use the App to book a table or confirm a table booking at participating restaurants. The App is free, simple and quick to use. Download today and raise vital funds for LFCT for no cost to you.   Once you have downloaded the App, click on the ‘person’ icon and create an account. Then click the ‘hand’ icon along the bottom and search for Lady Fatemah Charitable Trust. Click on the trust and the ‘heart’ icon at the top. It is as easy as that! Now you can raise funds.   Then next time you go to book a restaurant search for your chosen restaurant through the App. When identified, click on the ‘plus’ in the corner of the screen. You can book participating restaurants through the app or separately by phoning or booking online. You can then ‘confirm you booking on the app’ and LFCT will receive £1 per person just for you going out to eat! If you walk into a restaurant you can also use the app by searching for the restaurant and if it is participating, clicking the ‘2 person’ symbol at the bottom of the screen and follow the instructions.   Let us know how you get on! Happy dining!   APPEAL: Sheets are our only shelter from the wind   appeal-sheets   Several decades ago in Bihar, India, Fatima Khatoon’s Saddah family hit a financial crisis. One of several daughters, her father was struggling to support his family. For his daughters that were old enough, he arranged marriages for them. This included Fatima. Soon into her own marriage, Fatima’s new husband began to suffer from a range of long term health conditions which has led to him grow increasingly weak and unable to work. Fatima has stood by her husband and now finds herself in a very similar position to her family before her father arranged the marriage. Fatima and her husband have had seven children. They are primarily supported by their one son who did not complete formal schooling and works as an auto rickshaw driver. Their son works very hard and his income is supplemented by some paid domestic work that Fatima and her other children perform, however their lack of access to opportunities and education means their earning power is low and the family can afford daily food but little else.   A limited income means the family were living on the streets until a neighbour in the area kindly offered the space of their veranda for the family to live on. The family have been living on the veranda, out in the open with sheets to offer some shelter from the wind. They have no access to a toilet or bathing facilities and cook food on a stove in the yard. Despite working hard, low incomes and high living costs in India mean the family cannot afford to rent living space. The family feel trapped in a cycle, one that is worsening health conditions and increasing the likelihood that the youngest siblings will soon drop out of school and seek work.   A LFCT supporter came to know about the family and has risen their case. With a helping hand the family will be able to support themselves. However, they need the seeds to sow this success – starting with a simple dwelling to shelter from the open and space to live in dignity and call their own.   The LFCT needs your help to give this family the best chance – particularly for the two youngest children who are still in school. With the purchase of land and the construction of a simple house with a kitchen and bathroom, this family can begin to help themselves.   The estimated cost of the construction is INR 850,000/£10,008.23. This is a much more sustainable option that renting and will provide long term security. Please help to assist this Saddah Sister and her family today. We look forward to updating you with their progress.   ONGOING APPEAL: Iraq’s Orphans   20161207_100325[1]   Iraq has not had stability in more than ten years and this sees no sign of abating, leaving even more children orphaned each day. 2013 was a particularly bad year in which the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq – UNAMI considered one of the bloodiest years in Iraq’s history. Yet it continues.   The LFCT is supporting Iraq’s orphans and widows to find their path to a better future, giving them a helping hand after they find themselves in difficult circumstances. With your support, children like Hussain and his siblings can stay and even return to school. With an education and opportunities, they can make their own bright futures. Just one extra year of schooling can increase children’s earning ability as adults by up to 10% (Global Partnership for Education, 2016).   $35.00 per month will pay for an orphan’s living and schooling needs, equipping her with the tools to thrive and stand on her own two feet. Thank you.   ONGOING APPEAL: Ophthalmology Department, Karbala – Blindness destroys not only a person’s vision – it destroys the future of whole families   In 2015, the LFCT committed to transforming the lives of thousands in Karbala. That commitment continues until the goal of a fully finished Ophthalmology Department is realised.   2   A person forced to imagine the beauty of nature; a parent that can’t watch their child blossom into adulthood; a child that cannot see the comfort of a mothers embrace – these are all unfortunate realities of many people living in the Middle East. Unlike many other epidemics, over 80% of blindness is preventable.   This equates to a staggering 800 million people that suffer unnecessarily.   When a person is struck with a debilitating disease that results in blindness in the Middle East, that person then loses his/her opportunity to support their family. A domino effect then begins to play out as that person is forced into poverty and thus cannot contribute to the economy through buying and selling goods as he/she could’ve prior to the disease.   It might also shock you to read that the majority of people living with blindness are women, most blind people need someone to care for them, and this is usually a child.   The LFCT are committed to equipping an Ophthalmology Department and providing vital medical equipment for life changing procedures, including cataract, which can save someone from going blind.   It is only with your help that we can achieve this, Dear LFCT supporters, please show your generosity and kindness today.   LFCT in Pakistan: Two water treatment plants provide clean water in Korangi, Pakistan – health and dignity for the whole community    “We are very thankful to the LFCT and MWT Trust for this great project and hope that all neighbours will benefit from this,” Sibtain Baaqir   0010   “Superb Job from LFCT, It’s like a miracle because even government has not provided us this facility,” Murtaza Shah Rizvi   Masoomeen Welfare Trust installed two reverse osmosis filter plants, purchased from Khaas Traders, Karachi. The capacity of an individual plant serves the drinking needs of at least 10,000 adjoining households. The beneficiaries will be both shopkeepers in adjoining commercial area as well as neighbouring low income households. Since water for such household needs is generally collected and carried home by women, they are expected to be the key beneficiaries, freeing up productive time and improving health. One of the LFCT’s supporters living nearby visited the plants and commented that, “The absence of basic infrastructure in the densely populated colony makes lives of the residents arduous and complicated. The basic necessities are not easily available and the poor performance of the government further adds to the misery of the population in the area.”   The plants will provide water twice a day, in the morning from 9am to 11am and secondly from 4pm to 6pm. Each family is able to collect 20 litres of water per day which should be sufficient for daily use. Due to low consumption of water in the winters, the supply will be done only once a day only. An entire block in the Colony has no water supply and they must fetch 1 – 2kms to fetch water, they now have two water plants located at a close proximity to the previous gruelling journey. Prices of general packaged filtered water available in the local shops range from Rs.30-80 for approximately 14-20 litre bottles. This cost is significantly high and does not fall in the frame of affordability for the locals of the colony.   The entire repair and maintenance cost for running the water treatment plants is fully, and willingly, overseen by the Masoomeen Welfare Trust. Through feedback with the beneficiary communities, (through periodic surveys, focus group discussions, or other feedback mechanisms and direct/indirect observation) the Masoomeen Welfare Trust ensure that the water treatment plant does not fall into misuse (e.g. through selling the plants water for commercial, profit-making purposes).   LFCT in Lebanon and Iraq: Three women showcase their entrepreneurial spirit – stitching workshop super sellers celebrated for December 2016 Microfinance project update   Zahraa Mohammed   The Microfinance project providing widows in Iraq the opportunity to stand on their own two feet and women in Lebanon the opportunity of employment celebrates another successful month.   The workshop in Lebanon is developing new designs of clothes to be stitched and Lebanese partners are sending many different samples to be discussed and explored by the widows in Iraq. Here the widows have the opportunity to make and provide opinions and comments on the designs and see if they suit their customer’s needs. A great relationship is developing and each listens and values the opinion of the other.   Through the month of December 2016 three widows were named the super sellers for the month. All three widows worked seriously hard and requested further items to sell. The widows sheared their experience of different ways of selling to their peers and hope to capacitate and motivate some of the newer sellers. Here is one of their stories:   Sana Jabir Chyiad Sana is a widow with three school children. She lives with her extended family and is delighted to be working with the microfinance project. She explains how she was worried about how she would support her children when the next school season started and did not know how she would cover their needs.   Sana started working with simple clothes from the micro finance shop. Through assistance from her neighbours, she sold to friends in the community. Sana has become acquainted with her neighbours and wider community – the project has bought her closer to her community and provided her with the means to a decent income.    “I am okay now, the project has enabled me to meet the needs of my children, their clothing, transportation to school and stationery”.   All three women are excellent role models for their peers taking part in the microfinance project. The sellers are giving lots of useful feedback and suggestions to the stitching workshop which in turn means the workshop in Lebanon can innovate and produce designs suited to the customers’ needs and requirements.   Everyone that takes part in the microfinance project has the chance to experiment with their own potential – many of the women exercise their great initiative in finding out the best ways to sell the most number of garments.   Piece by piece, the microfinance project is helping women in Iraq get back on their own two feet and we can see it going from strength to strength.   LFCT in Pemba: Five new families to join the live goats microfinance project in Pemba – we share the latest success as project is on path to self-sustainability   Slide11   Learning from the success of its live goat distribution project across Pakistan, the LFCT is replicating this model in Pemba, Tanzania with its long term partner. We share a progress report, nearly two years on and update you on the successes learnings, challenges and opportunities.   The live goat distribution project started off in Kisiwa Panza, Pemba in Early 2015, with 20 families and so far has yielded the following results:        
No. Male goats Female goats Total
Number distributed in 2015 10 40 50
Number of kids born 44 19 63
Total as of January 2017 54 59 113
  Adaptable and easy to maintain, the goats reproduce rapidly. The project has seen an increase of 126% in the total number of goats now in possession of the families. These new kids will soon be able to reproduce themselves.   19 goats are currently pregnant and expecting kids over the coming weeks and months. Each goat reproducing on average twice a year.   The families are planning to sell five male goats from the original ten. They have a high number of male goats and selling the goats would raise a total of 800,000Tsh/ approx. £300. From this sale a further 11 – 12 female goats may be purchased to help increase the rate of reproduction further and enable a further five families to benefit by becoming involved in the project. This will bring the total families involved to 25.   In addition, a further 37 male kids will be sold off. These funds will be distributed among the original 20 families as their profit for the two years. Each female goat can fetch 130,000Tsh/approx. £50, and the total Tshs 4,810,000.00/approx. £1,788.00 This would give each family would give each family approximately 240,000Tsh/ £90.   Goats bring many benefits and in the future the families may sell some of the milk or utilise it for themselves but the challenge remains that if the goats continue to rapidly reproduce, that they will need the milk for their own kids.   The project is growing and we continue to learn. Once the initial input in the form of goats and some basic training has been imparted, the project grows naturally and two years on, we are really starting to see it become self-sustaining and involving new families from income generated from the initial input.   LFCT Medical Referral Program (December 2016) – 9,374 patients have been treated – assisted from 2006 to 31st December 2016   28 patients were assisted with treatment cost in December 2016, raising the total to 9,374 patients between October 2005 and December 2016, including 2,481 children aged 18 years and less.   2   Hamed A. hails from the Iraqi village of Chebayesh in Nasseriyeh province. During the reign of Saddam Hussein, the family was subject to political persecution and escaped to a neighboring country. In Chebayesh, tribal customs make the marriage of first paternal cousins a must, a custom that unfortunately leads to hereditary diseases appearing in the children. Hamed and his wife have three children, two of whom suffer from thalassemia major, a hereditary blood disorder that makes it difficult or impossible for the body to produce functioning red blood cells. Complications of this disease and its treatment – blood transfusions and chelation therapy to remove excess iron from the body – are bone deformities, spleenomegaly, endocrine problems and heart problems. 16-year-old Mohammad Mehdi, while being an outstanding student despite missing many lessons due to health problems, measures only 1.40 meters and appears like a child of twelve. Delayed growth brings about not only short stature, but also affects certain organs, which become unable to function properly due to delayed development. Therefore, timely treatment with growth hormone (GH) injections is vital for him. At 300 GBP per month, the GH injections Mohammad Mehdi needs are very expensive and 50-year-old Hamed, who works as a laborer gaining about 100 GBP per month is unable to afford them. Until now, a charitable individual used to pay for Mohammad Mehdi’s thalassemia and other medications, but this support is no longer available. Interrupting GH treatment at this sensitive age would mean that Mohammad Mehdi would not grow and mature and could even be life-threatening by causing organ failure. LFCT’s partner paid two thirds of the cost of his GH treatment for December 2016.   Dear LFCT donors, please, continue to donate to this project. In December, average treatment cost per patient amounted to GB£ 195.00 while the MRP was able to offer £95 (48.5%) on average in assistance.   With £100, you can help a poor patient undergo essential medical treatment that will preserve his / her ability to work and contribute to their family and community instead of becoming a liability in addition to easing his / her suffering. With only 5 GBP per month, you enable a poor refugee to seek out-patient treatment in a timely manner, thus preventing that simple illnesses develop into severe conditions requiring expensive treatment.   LFCT in Pemba: Helping whole communities to live healthier lives – supporting a dedicated nursing student in Pemba Island, Tanzania WA   Bimkubwa Kai Kombo, aged 21, lives with her family in Muharitani Chake in Pemba, Tanzania. She has one elder sibling and four younger. Bimkubwa is studying Nursing at University College Zanzibar. She begun studying in October 2016. He is entering her second semester of the course and has six semesters in total. The total cost for the six semesters will be 5,293,500.00 Tshs/ £1,912.00. To date, Bimkubwa has not been able to pay any of the course fees. She is now entering the deadline for course fee payment and has no way of paying the fees. If she misses the deadline he will lose her place on the course.   Bimkubwa is a talented student who achieved an average of 85.2 per cent on her last report card. After studying for three years, Bamkubwa will become a fully qualified nurse. In 2013 the World Health Organisation has stated that Tanzania has an acute shortage of nurses across the country with approximately 33,000 trained professionals in the country to serve a population of 49 million.   Once trained, Bimkubwa will add to the great need for nurses, providing vital healthcare and playing a key role in her country’s development. Unfortunately, the future is still uncertain, particularly as the deadline for fee payment draws closer. Bimkubwa’s family can ill afford the fees and Bimkubwa was sure she would be awarded a scholarship or gain support from local trusts. She is determined to finish her studies and support her country’s healthcare system.   By supporting the LFCT to help Bimkubwa to study you will be helping whole communities to live healthier and longer lives as Bimkubwa becomes an important player in Tanzania’s healthcare system.   LFCT in Gaza: Empowering Deaf Women and Men and other Marginalised and Needy Women in the Gaza Strip through Livelihood Opportunities Final Project report   Photo-004   Still no promises have been made or recognition of any improvement in the Gaza Strip has been identified. The outlook seems as bleak as ever and people continue to struggle to make it through their daily commitments.   The deaf community in the Gaza Strip faces even more difficult challenges with rarely any form of job opportunities being available to them due to their “inability to communicate with the hearing members of the community”. Although much work has been done within the Gazan community towards deaf culture and rights however, deafness still remains a stigma in the Palestinian society with many limitations and preconceptions surrounding the deaf.   Approximately 19,000 deaf persons reside within the Gaza Strip. Atfaluna Society for Deaf Children (ASDC) has been working alongside the deaf community since its establishment in 1992. Vocational training courses and awareness of rights have been among the most essential components. With the generous support of The Lady Fatemah (A.S) Charitable Trust (LFT), thirty (30) deaf women and men and other marginalized and needy women were supported through job opportunities for a period of 6 months (June – November, 2016). The deaf women and men were able to maintain their centre-based job opportunities in the fields of sewing, embroidery, pottery making, culinary arts, painting on wood and carpentry.    “Alhamdu Lillah this has been a dream come true for me, I can’t believe the months went by so fast!  This experience has not only added to my skills; it also gave me the opportunity to interact with people outside the confines of my home which I rarely have the chance to do. I have been assisting my parents with our home expenses during the past months; I even bought my mother a gift! May Allah grant wealth and happiness to the people who gave me this opportunity.” Happily, expressed Nasra, a deaf trainee supported through the Lady Fatemah Trust project.   Receiving hands-on training within a professional environment is an important part of giving deaf women and men the opportunity to learn and grow. ASDC continues to work hard towards giving the deaf community the independence and self-reliance they need to become productive and active participants within their communities. “Thank you Lady Fatemah Trust for giving me a chance! Thank you for allowing me to learn and grow. This has been an excellent chance for me to realize my potential and break free from negativity and hopelessness. May Allah reward you highly.” Stated Bahaa, a deaf trainee supported through the Lady Fatemah Trust project.    “When Khadijah first began the six months training period, she had rarely been outside of her home. She was shy, reluctant and unable to make friends. It was just a few weeks later that we began to notice the quick improvement in her attitude and personality. This young lady was soon excelling in her work, she was making friends and she was happily communicating using sign language with her colleagues. It has been a real pleasure watching the improvement in the majority of these young women and men who truly only needed the right opportunity.” Expressed Ibrahim, a supervisor at ASDC.        As the training comes to an end, the trainees are feeling accomplished and confident. The six months’ period has given them an opportunity to strengthen their skills in the various fields, improve their self-esteem and make new friends. Their enthusiasm and desire to learn was evident throughout the period with many of them optimistic to find new supported opportunities within ASDC.   ASDC, however, will continue to do its best to support and guide the beneficiaries even after the project completion in hope to help them achieve their goals and dreams. The support provided through the Lady Fatemah (A.S) Trust has been highly appreciated by the deaf youth and their families who expressed their sincere gratitude for this significant and timely opportunity.
8th
Mar
2017

Newsletter Jumaada al Awal – Jumada Al-Akhirah 1438 A.H. Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem


Dear Supporters – Salaamun Alaikum Exciting News: LFCT granted special Consultative Status with UN
By the Grace Allah and with the Blessing and continued protection and Blessing of Sayyidah Fatemah a.s. the Trust has been granted special consultative status but the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC).
This status means the Trust can attend ECOSOC meetings and issue statements. This will be a great window to spread awareness of the Trust’s work and to raise the issues we commit ourselves to.
ECOSOC is one of the six principle groupings if the United Nations and is responsible for coordinating the work of 15 UN specialised agencies across economic and social works. It describes itself as, “At the centre of the UN development system, we conduct cutting-edge analysis, agree on global norms and advocate for progress. Our collective solutions advance sustainable development”.
12th Annual Gala Dinner   2017 is the 20th Anniversary of LFCT. Gala Dinner will be held on 06th May 2017 at London Heathrow Marriott Hotel, Bath Road, Hayes, Middlesex UB3 5AN

Key Note Speaker: Baroness Emma Nicholson of Winterbourne   Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne is a Peer of the Realm and a member of the House of Lords.   She serves as the Prime Minister, Trade Envoy to Azerbaijan, The Republic of Iraq and Turkmenistan and co-chairs the All Party Parliamentary Groups for Foreign Affairs and the Prevention of Sexual Violence in Conflict. She is a member of the Conservative Party.   Please book your tickets now via CharityCheckout. Tickets are £60.00 per person. This is your Trust which operates on ZERO Admin since 1997.   LFCT: Would you like an opportunity to raise funding for us and save yourself money at the same time? The LFCT has partnered with the Utility Warehouse, a company providing 500,000 customers with phone, mobile, broadband, gas and electricity in one single bill. They guarantee that will save you money when you switch your services to them or will give you back double your money! How it raises funds for the LFCT is by using our special link, below. We get £5 per customer plus an ongoing commission per month, a percentage of your bill that will be around £3 – 5 on average per customer. You really have nothing to lose!
Please join in! Call 0800 131 300 today, and give our appeal number L73751 Or visit our website www.utilitywarehouse.org.uk/L73751
Visit the link below for a presentation with more information: https://extranet.utilitywarehouse.co.uk/downloads//CFR/Presentation_to_Community_Members_August2016.ppsx
APPEAL: Terrible accidental fire leaves family distraught – Six year old Ruqaia needs your help for a quick recovery
 Ruqaia Maitham Ali is like any other six year old girl. She enjoys playing and reading and her parents look forward to a bright future for her.
However since last October, each day is a little more difficult for Ruqaia and her family. Last Ashura when her family were cooking in their home in dedication to Imam Hussain (a.s) Ruqaia was involved in a terrible accident when the gasoline her mother was cooking with leaked and their home caught fire. Little Ruqaia was engulfed by the flames suffering severe burns, especially to her face.
Ruqaia was rushed to hospital delirious with pain. Her parents were distraught and after some initial treatment for the burns was allowed home. Ruqaia now struggled to breathe and will need several surgeries over the coming months and years. The cost of her surgery has kindly been covered so far by Dr Alaa AlJurani but future treatments might incur further costs for the family. Each month Ruqaia’s skin ointment and bandages cost approximately $100.00 – 150.00
For Ruqaia’s family the cost of this ongoing treatment is bringing great financial strain. Her father is a volunteer with AlHashid Al Shabi in Mosul and his honorarium is only enough to cover their basic living.
In addition, the family home has been partially destroyed. The family will unlikely be able to cover the repair of their home but for now their immediate concern is paying for Ruqaia’s treatment. The family’s living condition was poor before the fire and they cannot risk any infection to Ruqaia’s burns. The healthcare professionals treating Ruqaia have suggested that she will increase her chance of recovery if she is to have a clean mattress and bedding and loose clothing for her wounds.
With this simple yet life changing support, Ruqaia will likely make a much quicker recovery and be able to get back to being a healthy and happy six year old.
Please consider a generous donation. Thank you.  
ONGOING APPEAL: Iraq’s Orphans The LFCT is supporting Iraq’s orphans and widows to find their path to a better future, giving them a helping hand after they find themselves in difficult circumstances. With your support, children like Hussain and his siblings can stay and even return to school. With an education and opportunities, they can make their own bright futures. Just one extra year of schooling can increase children’s earning ability as adults by up to 10% (Global Partnership for Education, 2016).

  Eftikhar has dreams for her children like any other mother. Karar Wisam lost his father when he was just three years old. His father was working with the national security forces in Iraq and one seemingly normal day an explosion carried out by terrorists killed his father whilst he was at work. In a split second the life of Karar and his two siblings was changed forever. Karar’s mother, Eftikhar Hassan, was pregnant with her fourth child at the time of her husband’s tragic death. Born soon after his father passed away, Karar’s youngest brother will never know his father.   Being pregnant made the tragedy even more difficult for Eftikhar. She was now solely responsible for bringing up her children and bringing in an income. She moved her children to be with her husband’s family, where they are now residing in one room in a home with 12 people. At first Eftikhar took some financial assistance from the family but wanted to bring in her own income and be a strong role model for her children.   She became involved in the microfinance project, selling clothing, and her children are now receiving a monthly financial support. This ensures that they can continue with their schooling and work hard for a better future.   GBP 35.00 US$ 45.00 per month will pay for an orphan’s living and schooling needs, equipping her with the tools to thrive and stand on her own two feet. Thank you.   ONGOING APPEAL: Ophthalmology Department, Karbala – Blindness destroys not only a person’s vision – it destroys the future of whole families
In 2015, the LFCT committed to transforming the lives of thousands in Karbala. That commitment continues until the goal of a fully finished Ophthalmology Department is realised.   A person forced to imagine the beauty of nature; a parent that can’t watch their child blossom into adulthood; a child that cannot see the comfort of a mothers embrace – these are all unfortunate realities of many people living in the Middle East. Unlike many other epidemics, over 80% of blindness is preventable.   This equates to a staggering 800 million people that suffer unnecessarily.   When a person is struck with a debilitating disease that results in blindness in the Middle East, that person then loses his/her opportunity to support their family. A domino effect then begins to play out as that person is forced into poverty and thus cannot contribute to the economy through buying and selling goods as he/she could’ve prior to the disease.   It might also shock you to read that the majority of people living with blindness are women, most blind people need someone to care for them, and this is usually a child.   The LFCT are committed to equipping an Ophthalmology Department and providing vital medical equipment for life changing procedures, including cataract, which can save someone from going blind.   It is only with your help that we can achieve this, Dear LFCT supporters, please show your generosity and kindness today.   LFCT in Ethiopia: Story from Masudin and Amina Ali on the impact and LFCT funded water project is having on their lives

For Ashute Gaguro Village in Ginnir District, shortage of water for drinking and household use was a serious problem. The community usually went to nearby spring with poor yield, meaning they often have to wait for hours for the water to clear and the spring refill itself. Often, it meant spending more than an hour to fill a 20 litre jerry can. When the spring dried out in the summer months, they resorted to walking up to an hour to get to a nearby pond. When rain failed for two consecutive years, it was even more difficult for the community.   Mr. Masudin Ali is one of the occupants of the village. A local farmer and an influential figure. Masudin lived with his family since getting married to his wife Amina 21 years ago. For the last five years, the family experienced the water crisis first hand.   His wife, Amina carried the burden the most. Collecting firewood and going to the seasonal contaminated pond, steam and river for water has long been in her daily responsibility. Because of carrying heavy loads most of her life, she was not able to have a normal delivery for two of her youngest children.   “The physicians who attended to me during my last two deliveries told me not to carry heavy loads anymore. Sometimes my daughters help but when they have to go to school, I have no choice but to do it myself.” says Amina.   It was not only the heavy loads and the long distance walks that were a daily challenge but the water itself which exposed people to health risks. As the seasonal ponds and river were the only available water sources, the animals also depend on them.   When the Organization for Help Out intervened the beneficiaries on behalf of its donor i.e. the Lady Fatemah (as) Charitable Trust in response to the water crisis, it was a good news for the community. The spring in the locality was identified as having a relatively good potential if developed further. As such, the spring was fully developed, caped and now provides adequate clean water to the community. Now that the spring is located close enough to the people, the time spent and distance travelled to fetch water has reduced a lot of the burden on women and girls. Many women are now using the time saved for productive activities such as faming and girls are now increasingly attending their school. Besides, as the water source is now located close enough to the people and is of better quality, each family in the village fetches and uses more and better water. This is certainly contributing to an improved health status of community members in village.   LFCT in Pakistan: Hard labour and 200 bags of cement later, the road to from Kot Jindan to Islamabad has been successfully repaired brining villagers closer to education, schools, hospitals and job opportunities.

Kot Jindan is a small village between the mountains behind Islamabad, Pakistan. The village has a population of 3,000 people with approximately 200 of them coming to Islamabad for work, medical facilities and studies. The road they travel on is 5 – 6 Km long. However the road is in a very poor condition. It is uneven, rocky and crumbling. First it climbs a steep mountain before descending down into the valley where the village is. As the road comes into the valley it becomes very muddy. For the villagers, the road is vital. They have tried to repair and stabilise the road in parts using their own savings.   Accessing Islamabad brings a lifeline to villagers, who through hard work and dedication are working their hardest to make a better living for their families and community.   After appealing to the LFCT, the 1500 feet of extremely uneven, crumbling road has been paved with concrete. The villagers all helped out with the labour, and the photographs illustrate the fantastic transformation.
One villager said the following: “I had to come to the city every day to attend classes. It was very difficult to negotiate this difficult part of the road. I used to get off from the vehicle and push it to negotiate this portion. Now it has become very smooth driving. Thank you Lady Fatemah Trust for this kind gesture. We, the young people participated by doing physical labour in making this patch of the road”. Student, 22 years old.   LFCT: Medical Assistance Program (January 2017) Assistance – treatment to 9,406 Patients given from 2005 to January 2017

32 patients were assisted with treatment cost in January 2017, raising the total to 9,406 patients between October 2005 and January 2017, including 2,486 children aged 18 years and less.   46-year-old Iraqi refugee Basemeh S has four children. Her husband, seven years her senior, works as a driver gaining about £130 per month, of which the family has to pay £30 in rent. Recently, Basemeh’s health has been declining and she finally consulted a doctor, who ordered expensive lab tests and an X-ray. Basemeh’s husband borrowed money to be able to pay for his wife’s tests. During her follow-up visit, Basemeh’s doctor prescribed equally costly medications. Her husband was not only unable to borrow more money but some of his creditors were also pressing him to pay his debts. Finally, the family found its way to the office of LFCT’s partner after hearing from other refugees that LFCT’s partner has a Medical Assistance Program.  LFCT’s partner paid slightly more than half of Basemeh’s treatment cost and the family was able to purchase her medications and pay the most insistent creditors.   LFCT in Iraq: Two cows and two calves find their new home with the families in Babylon The LFCT continues its assistance to 18 families that fled from Mosul.

Prior to their forced resettlement, many of the families were shepherds. As such, they have gathered a wealth of experience in rearing sheep and best practice. The families showed an interest in continuing this work in their new settlement. The families have been split into two groups, with five families in each. They requested five sheep and two goats per group.   We have now procured the sheep and been granted an offer with the vendor of, “buy one get male kid free”. Now each group has five sheep plus five male kids. The total price is also lower than we budgeted for at £135 per sheep and includes the free male kid. We were offered a very good deal by a local tradesman who heard about the widow’s journey and agreed a special offer for the project”. We have also found a kind cow seller man who heard about the widows and wanted to assist. He has offered us two cows and their calves (also females) at £1,350 each. For £2,700 we have now received four cows. This is an extremely kind act by the seller who has heavily discounted the price of the cows which effectively now equate to £675 each.   The cows are already producing milk for their calves and so are able to provide additional milk at ease for the families’ own nourishment. The widows all commented on how this filled them with a fantastic feeling – they were able to provide milk to their sons from their own cows once again!   The aim of the project is to provide the families with the tools to become self-sufficient. Both the cows and sheep will provide produce for the families own nutrition and a source of income when produce is sold. In addition, the sheep will provide offspring and the manure from the cow can be used to nourish the soil and grow vegetables in a garden.   This project, along with the families own hard work, has the potential to see families thrive. Families will see a raise in their confidence, self-worth and dignity as once more they are able to put their Shepherding knowledge into practice and take charge of their own futures.        brbr>brbr>r>
31st
Mar
2017

Newsletter Jumada Al-Akhirah – Rajab 1438 A.H. Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem


Dear Supporters – Salaamun Alaikum   12th Annual Gala Dinner   2017 is the 20th Anniversary of LFCT. Gala Dinner will be held on 06th May 2017 at London Heathrow Marriott Hotel, Bath Road, Hayes, Middlesex UB3 5AN

Key Note Speaker: Baroness Emma Nicholson of Winterbourne   Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne is a Peer of the Realm and a member of the House of Lords.   She serves as the Prime Minister, Trade Envoy to Azerbaijan, The Republic of Iraq and Turkmenistan and co-chairs the All Party Parliamentary Groups for Foreign Affairs and the Prevention of Sexual Violence in Conflict.  She is a member of the Conservative Party.   Please book your tickets now via CharityCheckout. Tickets are £60.00 per person. This is your Trust which operates on ZERO Admin since 1997.     LFCT: Would you like an opportunity to raise funding for us and save yourself money at the same time? The LFCT has partnered with the Utility Warehouse, a company providing 500,000 customers with phone, mobile, broadband, gas and electricity in one single bill. They guarantee that will save you money when you switch your services to them or will give you back double your money! How it raises funds for the LFCT is by using our special link, below. We get £5 per customer plus an ongoing commission per month, a percentage of your bill that will be around £3 – 5 on average per customer. You really have nothing to lose! Please join in! Call 0800 131 300 today, and give our appeal number L73751 Or visit our website: www.utilitywarehouse.org.uk/L73751 Visit the link below for a presentation with more information: https://extranet.utilitywarehouse.co.uk/downloads//CFR/Presentation_to_Community_Members_August2016.ppsx   URGENT APPEAL: Women binding their stomach with rope to starve off hunger – Worst drought in 60 years and nearly 175,000 children are not attending pre-primary and primary schools.

Please help and make a donation to this urgent appeal today. A national emergency has been declared in Kenya. 23 of 47 counties are being affected by drought. This is part of a wider famine across the wider region affecting Sudan, South Sudan, Somalia, Yemen and Nigeria.    “The number of food insecure people has more than doubled – from 1.3 million to 2.7 million and some 357,285 children and pregnant and lactating mothers are acutely malnourished. Maize production in the coastal areas has decreased by 99 per cent compared to the long term average. People have to travel further to access water, for example in Baringo, household walk three times longer than normal. Pastoralist communities in the Arid and Semi-Arid Lands counties are losing their livestock – with reports of large numbers of animal deaths in Turkana, Marsabit, Samburu and Mandera counties.” Reliefweb, February 2017.   The cause of the drought is two consecutive poor rainy seasons, resulting in one of the driest years since 1950. Expected rains have been insufficient or failed completely. This had resulted in the failure of crops and livestock deaths.   Some families in Kenya are now eating only one meal a day in order to save their supplies. ActionAid has commented that they met women who are binding their stomachs with rope or pieces of cloth in an attempt to stave off hunger. The LFCT will be working with Safina Charity who are going to conduct an emergency food and water relief effort in the area. They are targeting a minimum of 1000 families at a rate of 2000Kshs/£16.00 per family. Each family pack will comprise of:  5kgs Maize flour (ugali); 5kgs rice; 3 liters oil; – 2kgs sugar; 2kgs maharagwe or lentils; 2 crates of water (48 bottles of 500ml each)   We are appealing for you to make a donation towards this urgent appeal. Please help us to work with Safina Chiarty to provide as many food baskets as possible to people in Wajir who for no fault of their own find themselves in desperate circumstances.   ONGOING APPEAL: Iraq’s Orphans

The LFCT is supporting Iraq’s orphans and widows to find their path to a better future, giving them a helping hand after they find themselves in difficult circumstances. With your support, children like Hussain and his siblings can stay and even return to school. With an education and opportunities, they can make their own bright futures. Just one extra year of schooling can increase children’s earning ability as adults by up to 10% (Global Partnership for Education, 2016).   US$ 30.00 / GB£ 30.00 per month will pay for an orphan’s living and schooling needs, equipping an individual with the tools to thrive and stand on their own two feet. Thank you.   ONGOING APPEAL: Ophthalmology Department, Karbala – Blindness destroys not only a person’s vision – it destroys the future of whole families   In 2015, the LFCT committed to transforming the lives of thousands in Karbala. That commitment continues until the goal of a fully finished Ophthalmology Department is realised.   A person forced to imagine the beauty of nature; a parent that can’t watch their child blossom into adulthood; a child that cannot see the comfort of a mothers embrace – these are all unfortunate realities of many people living in the Middle East. Unlike many other epidemics, over 80% of blindness is preventable.   This equates to a staggering 800 million people that suffer unnecessarily.   When a person is struck with a debilitating disease that results in blindness in the Middle East, that person then loses his/her opportunity to support their family. A domino effect then begins to play out as that person is forced into poverty and thus cannot contribute to the economy through buying and selling goods as he/she could’ve prior to the disease.   It might also shock you to read that the majority of people living with blindness are women, most blind people need someone to care for them, and this is usually a child.   The LFCT are committed to equipping an Ophthalmology Department and providing vital medical equipment for life changing procedures, including cataract, which can save someone from going blind.   It is only with your help that we can achieve this, Dear LFCT supporters, please show your generosity and kindness today.   UPDATE: Successful surgery for six year old Ruqaia who was suffered serious burns in a terrible accident

Last Ashura when Ruqaia’s family were cooking in their home in dedication to Imam Hussain (a.s) Ruqaia was involved in a terrible accident when the gasoline her mother was cooking with leaked and their home caught fire. Little Ruqaia was engulfed by the flames suffering severe burns, especially to her face  Ruqaia was rushed to hospital delirious with pain. Her parents were distraught and after some initial treatment for the burns was allowed home. Ruqaia now struggled to breathe and needs several surgeries. The cost of her surgery has kindly been covered so far by Dr Alaa AlJurani and after a successful appeal future treatments will been covered by  dedicated LFCT supporters. This includes ongoing treatment including ointment and clean bandages for her wounds.   We are now delighted to report that Ruqaia has undergone the first set of surgery which has gone successfully. She spent a night recovering in hospital and once new sheets, bedding and clothing were provided to the family along with the first months’ worth of bandages.   With this simple yet life changing support, Ruqaia will likely make a much quicker recovery and be able to get back to being a healthy and happy six year old.   Thank you so much for your generous support we will keep you updated of Ruqaia’s progress and recovery.   LFCT in Gaza: Moaz is determined to make a brighter future for himself, his family and his fellow Gazan’s. All he needs is your help.

Moaz Jaber is a student of the Faculty of Human Science, studying Social Work at the Al Azhar University in Gaza City. Moaz and his family live in the Gaza Strip in Palestine. The constant threat of violence and conflict means the economy is poor. Moaz’s father has been unable to find any permanent work and has been long term unemployed. The six member family live in a modest house in Rafeh and rely on the goodwill of neighbours and family to help them with their daily needs.   Moaz is a bright student and took up his offer at a place at Al Azhar University. His brother and family have helped to pay his first semester’s fees but he has struggled to source a scholarship. He is required to pay his second semester’s fees before sitting his examination. If he cannot make this payment, he will be unable to sit the exam and will have to drop out of the course.   Moaz is determined to make a brighter future for himself, his family and his fellow Gazan’s.   All that stands between this are the fees for the four year course. The total fees are 2,176 Jordanian Dinar/ £2,462. Moaz chose to study Social Work so that he could become a Social Worker. He said, “Being in area of conflict, people need social support to overcome the traumatic events they face, they need social counselling and awareness. People also need humanitarian assistance. All of this can be provided through the social worker role (which my country needs so badly)”.     With some small financial assistance Moaz will be able to pull his whole family from below the poverty line whilst providing a vital service for his fellow Gazan’s. Please help to provide Moaz with the support he needs to continue in University and provide for his country.   LFCT in Lebanon: Hit by a car: Last week Zahra’s 16 year old blind son was hit by a car that didn’t stop

Zahra Salem Alabd is a mother of eight children. As well as being a mother, Zahra has a job as a domestic worker to bring income in for the family. Zahra and her family are currently living in Nabatieh District in Lebanon after fleeing their home in Syria.
For Zahra, life is a precarious balancing act and she tried to make the best out of the circumstances that have developed around her. Two of her children are blind and have not developed the skills to communicate properly. They have recently been granted some assistance from a Spanish NGO to help them develop. This is great positive news for the family but this will only help one of their issues. The family still struggle to pay rent and daily living. Zainab, the eldest daughter is struggling to find work in Lebanon related to her nursing qualification. She needs a work permit and without one, no hospital will accept her. Zahra continues to be the family’s only breadwinner especially as her husband has chronic back pain meaning he is confined to bed for large periods of time and cannot work.
Just last week their eldest son, Hussain, who is blind, was hit by a car. The driver left him until someone came to help. He requires an X-Ray to check that no bones are broken. At $330 USD for the X-Ray, this is more than the family can afford – and is more than the family’s entire monthly income.
The family have complex needs and risk never being able to lift themselves out of their situation. With a helping hand up, they will be able to move forward and thrive into the future.
The LFCT is appealing to its generous supporters to help the family with US$ 310.00 for Zahra’s injections to ease her mobility issues and enable her to work more; US$ 333.00 for Hussein’s X-Ray to make sure no bones were broken or internal damage cause when he was hit by a car and US$ 266.00 to pay for a shortfall in rent that the family have fallen behind on snice Ali, the father, has had to stop working.
Each month the LFCT will support the family with a stipend of US$ 300.00 until it is safe enough for them to return to Syria or their daughter, Zainab receives a work permit and they have another income stream.   The LFCT fears that without this vital assistance the family’s problems will only get worse and they will lose hope. But with your help, we can change this for the better. Let’s give them some hope, please donate generously.   LFCT in Syria: Food baskets bring hope to cease some early marriages amongst Syrian refugee girls in Lebanon

The LFCT working with a local organization in Lebanon has completed the second phase of food basket distribution to some families finding themselves in the most difficult of circumstances.
Our partner said, “After meeting many families, we have noticed social change among the Syrian refugees. Although there are some changes in the situation in Syria, some of the smaller families we met are not willing to go back to Syria again. They feel and taste the independence that they got living alone without sharing a house with many family members. One lady explained that back in Syria she used to live with 58 other extended family members. It was very crowded and now in Lebanon though they struggle, the situation is safer and less crowded. She explained how there was less conflict here and she has more control over supporting her children”.
However, the complex situation shows itself again, when our LFCT partner organisation explained that, “We have also seen social change among Lebanese that we have noticed the increase on second marriage and the second wife is Syrian and their “Mahr” is low. They are also not demanding well-furnished houses, wedding or honeymoon trips. This means many Syrian families are willing to make their daughter married at an early age to reduce the family expenses. We have heard from many Syrian fathers and mothers that they are looking for grooms to reduce the family living cost as they cannot afford feeding and clothing our daughter with high cost standard in Lebanon”.
This is worrying and these are exactly the families that the food basket distribution has been working with in the hope to limit early marriage. This could have potentially damaging effects on the health, economic situation and social situation of the next generation of Syrians. Syria needs literate and educated young people to help rebuild the country moving forward.
The importance of this intervention means it is helping to empower the refugees and saving the future of many young girls whom are forced to get marry early to ease the family of food and clothing costs.   
28th
Apr
2017

Newsletter Rajab ~ Shabban 1438 A.H. Bismillahi rahmaani Raheem


Dear Supporters – Salaamun Alaikum

12th Annual Gala Dinner

JUST ONE WEEK UNTIL THE LFCT GALA! Have you got your ticket? Last few places remaining.
2017 is the 20th Anniversary of LFCT. Gala Dinner will be held on 06th May 2017 at London Heathrow Marriott Hotel, Bath Road, Hayes, Middlesex UB3 5AN

It is set to be another fantastic evening of friendship and family, fundraising and inspiration. This year we are joined by Baroness Emma Nicholson, a longstanding British politician and Executive Chariman of the Iraq British Business Council. She is a member of the United Kingdom Delegation to the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe and chairs the All Party Parliamentary Groups on Foreign Affairs. She co-founded the children’s charity Lumos with JK Rowling. A three course meal will be served and a comedian will entertain you at the end of the evening. You will learn more about our work and see first-hand our bold vision for the future work of the Trust.

We look forward to seeing you there. Please visit the website for more information.

Please book your tickets now via CharityCheckout.
Tickets are £60.00 per person.
This is your Trust which operates on ZERO Admin since 1997.

LFCT: Would you like an opportunity to raise funding for us and save yourself money at the same time?
The LFCT has partnered with the Utility Warehouse, a company providing 500,000 customers with phone, mobile, broadband, gas and electricity in one single bill. They guarantee that will save you money when you switch your services to them or will give you back double your money! How it raises funds for the LFCT is by using our special link, below. We get £5 per customer plus an ongoing commission per month, a percentage of your bill that will be around £3 – 5 on average per customer. You really have nothing to lose!
Please join in! Call 0800 131 300 today, and give our appeal number L73751 Or visit our website  www.utilitywarehouse.org.uk/L73751
Visit the link below for a presentation with more information:
https://extranet.utilitywarehouse.co.uk/downloads//CFR/Presentation_to_Community_Members_August2016.ppsx

ONGOING APPEAL: Iraq’s Orphans
Hamida’s Story: Just like any mother, Hamida wants her children to avail their right to education

Hamida Nomas Hady has seven sons. She lives in a house in poor condition; the roof has multiple leakages and the walls are damp. Hamida cannot afford to make the necessary repairs to her house. In fact, the family struggle to get by. Hamida has raised all seven of her sons by herself. Hamida’s husband died from blood cancer when her eldest sons, now 28 and 27, were just young men. Although four of her eldest sons are married, they are unable to help their mother with their youngest three brothers, just 10, nine and eight years old. These, the eldest sons had to drop out from education in order to study when they were growing up. They needed to work to support the family income when there were eight mouths to feed. Hamida’s mother and father in law have moved in with her, they are elderly and are beginning to need taking care of. Hamida is put under increasing pressure to support them as well as herself and her young sons.

However, Hamida heard about the micro-finance project once her sons started getting the monthly supplement to ensure they stayed in school. She decided to enroll. Hamida feels strongly that her youngest sons should be able to continue their education. Her eldest sons want this more than anything for their younger brothers – something they could never do.

The LFCT’s flagship orphans and widows support programme needs your assistance to continue. The micro-finance project helpings widows is going from strength to strength but we still need vital monthly sponsorships to enable orphans to stay in education. In the long run we hope all mothers can rely on their success in the micro-finance project to support their families.

ONGOING APPEAL: Ophthalmology Department, Karbala – Blindness destroys not only a person’s vision – it destroys the future of whole families

In 2015, the LFCT committed to transforming the lives of thousands in Karbala. That commitment continues until the goal of a fully finished Ophthalmology Department is realised.

A person forced to imagine the beauty of nature; a parent that can’t watch their child blossom into adulthood; a child that cannot see the comfort of a mothers embrace – these are all unfortunate realities of many people living in the Middle East. Unlike many other epidemics, over 80% of blindness is preventable.

This equates to a staggering 800 million people that suffer unnecessarily.

When a person is struck with a debilitating disease that results in blindness in the Middle East, that person then loses his/her opportunity to support their family. A domino effect then begins to play out as that person is forced into poverty and thus cannot contribute to the economy through buying and selling goods as he/she could’ve prior to the disease.

It might also shock you to read that the majority of people living with blindness are women, most blind people need someone to care for them, and this is usually a child.

The LFCT are committed to equipping an Ophthalmology Department and providing vital medical equipment for life changing procedures, including cataract, which can save someone from going blind.

It is only with your help that we can achieve this, Dear LFCT supporters, please show your generosity and kindness today.

LFCT in India: The Trust shares a collection of individuals helped through appeals this month in India
Saiyyad Nazeer Haider, who lives in Uttar Pradesh and for over twenty years has survived off the good will of his family. A religious man, Saiyyad has devoted his life to the Mosque but is now in great need of a roof over his head. His family can no longer care for him and his own children are aged between ten and 21. The LFCT have provided a house for Saiyyad at a cost of £10,807. This will help his children to stay in school and studying so that they can get higher paying jobs and support themselves and the family well into the future.

Next we turn to Sadiq Rizvi, aged eight, who lives with his elder sister, mother and father in Lucknow, India. He is a gifted student and achieved a grade of 74.35% on his last year’s final examinations. He has a prestigious place at the Lady Fatima Children’s Academy. The whole family are very proud of Sadiq and are excited for what his future might bring. However, as the family depend on the sole income of the father, an embroidery worker, at £60 per month, the fees at over £100 are nearly two months’ worth of wages. The family have appealed to the LFCT who will fund the school fees for this year.

Kaneez Fatima Alias Hina is eighteen years old. For the past two months she has been in hospital from what Doctors now know is Hypoplastic MDS. This is a syndrome that is similar to a type of anaemia where patients have low numbers of blood cells in the bone marrow. Kaneez requires costly surgery. Kaneez’s father works in a sugar mill in Mahmoodabad and can barely afford daily living let alone the cost of treatment. His family has arranged to cover just over £1,000.00 but there is still a deficit of £6,074 until Kaneez can undergo surgery. This surgery will save Kaneez’s life and without it she will not survive as the condition is chronic. The LFCT have arranged to support the cost of the surgery and help Kaneez grow into a healthy young woman.

Waheb Abbas is a talented nine year old living in Lucknow, India with his sister and parents. Waheb always enjoyed studying and it has paid off – in his final results last school year he got one of the top grades his class at 83.2%. Waheb and his family want him to have a bright future – the best he can possibly have. He has gained entry into Mufed Model Public School. However the fees, at £130 are more than twice the father’s income as a driver. The LFCT will pay Waheb’s fees for this school year and the family can continue to encourage him to aim high.
And finally, Haider Hussain Rizvi is just seven years old but is already showing signs of being a high achiever.
Although he suffered badly with dengue fever for much of the last school year, he still averaged over 75% in his final examinations. Like Wahed, Haider has been offered at place at Mufed Public High School. His family have appealed to the LFCT to cover the fees as they rely solely on the income of the father as a driver.